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Bookmarks: Soon Obsolete?

Bookmarks: Soon Obsolete?
Since the Web first came online in 1991, it has grown and improved beyond anyone's predictions. Unlike the gray background, mono-spaced text and ugly graphics on the Web in those early years, today's Web is rich with video, interactive applications and other useful and distracting goodies. But even after all these years, the way we find, navigate and save content on the Web works pretty much like it always did. Here's a page with text. Some of the words are hyperlinked, so when you click on them, you open another page. If you want to save something, there's a wide variety of tools that help you do so, but most people use the bookmarking feature built into their browsers, or social bookmarking sites. But now there's a conspicuously innovative new option. The service is functionally similar in some ways to social bookmarking sites, but its core function is "curation," which Wikipedia defines as the "selection, preservation, maintenance, and collection and archiving of digital assets."

http://www.pcworld.com/article/199329/bookmarks_soon_obsolete.html

Related:  Curatorial CuriosityWhat is Pearltrees?Why Pearltrees?

Pearltrees Radically Redesigns Its Online Curation Service To Reach A Wider Audience Pearltrees, the Paris-based online curation service that launched in late 2009, was always known for its rather quirky Flash-based interface that allowed you to organize web bookmarks, photos, text snippets and documents into a mindmap-like structure. For users who got that metaphor, it was a very powerful service, but its interface also presented a barrier to entry for new users. Today, the company is launching a radical redesign that does away with most of the old baggage of Pearltrees 1.0.

How Pearltrees is Beneficial Pearltrees is a social curation tool. It lets you organize, discover and share the stuff you like on the web. How does it work? Pearltrees Develops its New Interface Further with 'Meaning' Content and file curation and sharing platform Pearltrees has been updated today with new features that include ‘Meaning’, a new organization system. ‘Meaning’ is based on a traditional grid and allows users to drag and drop content into collections that can be shared with others and collaborated on with real-time synchronization. Pearltrees tells us that it hopes the new layout will encourage more collaboration between users. The company may have a point – a conventional grid could well take less time for new users to adapt to than Pearltrees’ old ‘tree of pearls‘ look that it moved away from earlier this year, even if it’s not quite as unique to look at. The France-based company’s video below shows Meaning in action: Meanwhile, Pearltrees’ mobile apps on iOS and Android have been updated with new features including a ‘tunable interest feed’ that delivers personalized content recommendations to your account.

6 reasons to use Pearltrees Pearltrees is the first and largest social curation community on the Internet. It’s a place to organize, discover and share all the cool content you find online. However, beyond this basic definition, a question remains: why would I want to use Pearltrees? Well, what I want to share with you are six major use cases (or reasons) we’ve identified as being most popular across our entire community of web curators. In addition, I’ll also share with you a couple of interesting ways in which I have put Pearltrees to use for myself. Hopefully, you’ll not only get value in learning how the community uses Pearltrees, but also be inspired to find even more clever and creative ways to use our software yourself.

Curating the Best of Tech and Social Media for Families Many people search the web, read content every day and share that content. While advances in search technology has made finding information easier and easier, saving and organizing information in a way that captures a story or conversation can still be very challenging. I just posted on Techmamas.com about my first experience with Pearltrees.com; I was on a Traveling Geeks trip to LeWeb and Pearltrees was one of the French companies we met. Being a visual person, the Pearltrees online application offered me the tools to capture and organize online information in a visual format that also reflected the storyline behind the issue being discussed. I decided that my next step was to use it and see what happens. What happened – is that adding content to Pearltrees became part of my daily workflow.

Curating the Best of Tech and Social Media for Families Many people search the web, read content every day and share that content. While advances in search technology has made finding information easier and easier, saving and organizing information in a way that captures a story or conversation can still be very challenging. I just posted on Techmamas.com about my first experience with Pearltrees.com; I was on a Traveling Geeks trip to LeWeb and Pearltrees was one of the French companies we met. Modern curation: How does it change teaching? SmartBlogs “The self is not something ready-made, but something in continuous formation through choice of action.” — John Dewey Rewind: The old way of curation In the past, curating resources was relatively easy. Teachers, known fondly to their family and friends as pack rats, filed and saved just about every piece of paper they could find. They crammed worksheets and memos into color-coded files near the back of the classroom. During my student teaching, there was a teacher who planned to retire in June.

Say Goodbye to Pinterest and Hello to Pearltrees A few weeks ago, I began to use a new service called Pearltrees, and its accompanying iPad app. Since that time, I have explored the service, shared and gathered pearls, and raved about it to every person I can think of. Now its time in the spotlight on iSource is well-deserved. With all the hubbub of syncing bookmarks and how “everybody is doing it” (Safari with iCloud, Chrome, etc.), Pearltrees quietly stands to the side as a more powerful, intuitive, and beautiful way to organize what you uncover on the web – as a Pearl.

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