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How Do We Know When Students Are Engaged?

How Do We Know When Students Are Engaged?
(Updated 11/2013) Educational author and former teacher, Dr. Michael Schmoker shares in his book, Results Now, a study that found of 1,500 classrooms visited, 85 percent of them had engaged less than 50 percent of the students. In other words, only 15 percent of the classrooms had more than half of the class at least paying attention to the lesson. So, how do they know if a student is engaged? Teacher-Directed Learning You will see students... Paying attention (alert, tracking with their eyes) Taking notes (particularly Cornell) Listening (as opposed to chatting, or sleeping) Asking questions (content related, or in a game, like 21 questions or I-Spy) Responding to questions (whole group, small group, four corners, Socratic Seminar) Following requests (participating, Total Physical Response (TPR), storytelling, Simon Says) Reacting (laughing, crying, shouting, etc.) Student-Directed Learning You see students individually or in small groups... Activity and Ownership

Reading Comprehension Worksheets "Your reading comprehension materials are the best I've found on the web. They are so thorough and comprehensive! My students and I have learned a lot from them. Thanks so much!" -- Susan B., Carter, KY. 03/21/12 Like these materials? On this page you will find our complete list of high quality reading comprehension worksheets created specially by our team for students in grade levels K-12. READTHEORYWorkbooks Visit our online store here! Our reading comprehension worksheets teach students to think critically, draw inferences, understand scope and global concepts, find or recall details, and infer the meaning of useful vocabulary words. © COPYRIGHT NOTICE: The below publications contain copyrighted work to be used by teachers in school or at home. Grade 1 - Find more here! Phew! You really really like reading comprehension. Critical Thinking Reading Comprehension Worksheets Short Story Reading Comprehension Worksheets Answers for this series are included at the end of each worksheet."

Kids Science Experiments - Kids Science Projects including, gravity, lights, floating, sinking, mixing, separating, absorption, magnets, heat, pressure, and getting reactions that are all fun, easy and exciting. Educational Games and Resources | Fuel the Brain US Science Digital Library The Differentiator Try Respondo! → ← Back to Byrdseed.com The Differentiator The Differentiator is based on Bloom's Taxonomy, Kaplan and Gould's Depth and Complexity, and David Chung's product menu. Try It In: French Dutch • Tweet It • Like Byrdseed • Pin It Students will judge the ethics of the [click to edit] using a textbook and create an essay in groups of three. Revised Bloom's Taxonomy adapted from "A Taxonomy for Learning,Teaching, and Assessing: A Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives" by Anderson and Krathwohl Depth and Complexity adapted from The Flip Book by Sandra N. Depth Big Idea Unanswered Questions Ethics Patterns Rules Language of the Discipline Essential Details Trends Complexity Multiple Points Of View Change Over Time Across the Disciplines Imperatives Origin Convergence Parallels Paradox Contribution Key Words Consequences Motivations Implications Significance Adapted from David Chung and The Flip Book, Too by Sandra N. Group Size One Two Three Four

ClassBrain Latest News | ClassBrain, where minds matter.... Inspirational Quotes to Live By Good quotes are often powerful words of wisdom that inspire, educate and even motivate a person to take action. They usually share common themes such as: Positive thinking leads to positive outcomesFailure is a stepping stone to successHelp yourself by helping othersDetermination, initiative and persistence are the foundation of success And yet these lessons of life are typically condensed into 1-2 lines. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. ”An eye for eye only ends up making the whole world blind.” - M.K. 9. ”Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.” - John F. 10. ”I haven’t failed. 11. ”It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” - Aristotle 12. ”It wasn’t raining when Noah built the ark.” - Howard Ruff 13. ”It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” - Vince Lombardi 14. ”Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.” - Sun-Tzu 15. ”Logic will get you from A to B. Like what you read?

Why does failure inspire some and demoralize others? Stanford Magazine reports on the applications from psychological research Carol Dweck's work, which uses careful experiments to determine why some people give up when confronted with failure, while others roll up their sleeves and dive in. Through a series of exercises, the experimenters trained half the students to chalk up their errors to insufficient effort, and encouraged them to keep going. Those children learned to persist in the face of failure–and to succeed. The control group showed no improvement at all, continuing to fall apart quickly and to recover slowly. These findings, says Dweck, “really supported the idea that the attributions were a key ingredient driving the helpless and mastery-oriented patterns.” The Effort Effect, Carol Dweck's book, "Mindset: The New Psychology of Success" (Thanks, Dad!)

The importance of stupidity in scientific research I recently saw an old friend for the first time in many years. We had been Ph.D. students at the same time, both studying science, although in different areas. She later dropped out of graduate school, went to Harvard Law School and is now a senior lawyer for a major environmental organization. At some point, the conversation turned to why she had left graduate school. To my utter astonishment, she said it was because it made her feel stupid. I had thought of her as one of the brightest people I knew and her subsequent career supports that view. For almost all of us, one of the reasons that we liked science in high school and college is that we were good at it. A Ph.D., in which you have to do a research project, is a whole different thing. That's when it hit me: nobody did. I'd like to suggest that our Ph.D. programs often do students a disservice in two ways. Productive stupidity means being ignorant by choice.

The 4-Letter Word That Everybody’s Talking About - Head Count Denver — Here at this giant gathering of admissions officers and high-school counselors, I keep hearing the same word over and over. People have mentioned it during sessions, uttered it over coffee, and probed its meaning in conversations. The word is “grit.” It’s as good a word as any for the determination that many educators now associate with student success. It’s long been said that test scores and grade-point averages don’t tell you the whole story about an applicant, but these days there’s growing interest in ways of measuring—and improving—student’s “noncognitive” skills, as speakers here at the National Association for College Admission Counseling’s annual meeting attested. Some institutions, such as Tufts and DePaul Universities, have incorporated noncognitive assessments into their evaluations of applicants. After all, we’re learning more and more about why students succeed or fail. In short, Ms. Ms. That suspicion seems to be easing, however. Return to Top

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind In outcomes-based learning environments, we generally see three elements in play: 1) learning objectives or targets are created from given standards; 2) instruction of some kind is given; and then 3) learning results are assessed. These assessments offer data to inform the revision of further planned instruction. Rinse and repeat. But lost in this clinical sequence are the Habits of Mind that (often predictably) lead to success or failure in the mastery of given standards. Below are all 16 Habits of Mind, each with a tip, strategy or resource to understand and begin implementation in your classroom. The habits themselves aren't new at all, and significant work has already been done in the areas of these "thinking habits." And a renewed urgency for their integration. The Habits of Mind by Art Costa and Bena Kallick don't simply represent fragments of practice to "add on" to what you already do, but rather new ways to think about how people learn. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

50 Really Cool Online Tools for Science Teachers A 21st-century education revolves around the Internet for everything from collaboration, tools, lessons, and even earning degrees online. If you are looking for ways to integrate online learning into your science class or science degree programs, then take a look at these cool online tools that are just perfect for both teachers and students. Science Tools to Use with Students These tools offer opportunities for learning about climate, cells, the human body, nature, and more. ChemiCool. AP Tools Whether you are setting up a new AP curriculum or are just looking for additional material to use with your AP science students, these tools will help. Advanced Placement Biology. Websites and Resources for Science Teachers These websites are chock full of amazing resources and tools for science teachers. Discovery Education. Calculators Use these informative environmental calculators with your students. Ecological Footprint Quiz. Online Games Online Science Games. Google Earth Google Earth Ocean.

Games As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation

Monthly Themes: Explorers Writing Prompt Description: Explorers return home with wondrous descriptions of what they have seen. Have students write a paragraph that describes their favorite place or a discovery they have made. Activities Grades K–3: Social Studies Ship Ahoy! In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue on a type of ship known as a caravel. Grades K–6: Social Studies By Land and by Sea Explorers roam the land and the sea in search of discovery. Grades 1–2: Social Studies Tales of Travels Stories about unfamiliar places often inspired explorers to go somewhere new. Grades 1–3: Science In Compass Tag, students will play a game using the cardinal directions to locate different objects around the classroom. Grades 1–8: Social Studies Quizzes Test students' knowledge about explorers. Grades 2–5: Geography, Math, Art Map It! Successful explorers were map-making experts. Grades 2–5: Social Studies/Language Arts Rescue Me! What happens when an explorer becomes stranded? Grades 2–8: Language Arts Word Finds Collectors' Cards

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