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Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : Shots - Health Blog

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : Shots - Health Blog
hide captionTeachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors. iStockphoto.com Teachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. In my Morning Edition story today, I look at expectations — specifically, how teacher expectations can affect the performance of the children they teach. The first psychologist to systematically study this was a Harvard professor named Robert Rosenthal, who in 1964 did a wonderful experiment at an elementary school south of San Francisco. The idea was to figure out what would happen if teachers were told that certain kids in their class were destined to succeed, so Rosenthal took a normal IQ test and dressed it up as a different test. "It was a standardized IQ test, Flanagan's Test of General Ability," he says. After the kids took the test, he then chose from every class several children totally at random. But just how do expectations influence IQ? Still, people have tried. Related:  Classroom Managementtmoses1DOK/Cognitive Rigor/High Expectations

Building Resiliency in Struggling Students: 7 Key Ideas from Research In the coming weeks, millions of students across the country will return to school. Countless numbers of them will be labeled with such terms as at-risk or high-risk for academic failure or inappropriate behavior. As educators, we strive to find interventions, strategies, and programs that will help these students be successful. Resiliency can be defined as the ability to persist in the face of adversity or the ability to bounce back after facing a challenging situation. Helping students develop resiliency skills and attitudes has a positive effect on academic achievement, behavior, and long-term success in life (Hanson & Austin, 2003). With this in mind, here are seven key ideas to help struggling students become resilient: Avoid labeling children as “high-risk” or “at-risk.” Post submitted by Bryan Harris, director of professional development for the Casa Grande Elementary School District in Arizona.

36 Things Every 21st Century Teacher Should Be Able To Do What should every teacher in the 21st century know and be able to do? That’s an interesting question. After just now seeing this excellent post on educatorstechnology.com, I thought I’d contribute to the conversation. I added the twist of ranking them from least complex to most complex, so novices can start at the bottom, and you veterans out there can skip right to 36. 36 Things Every 21st Century Teacher Should Be Able To Do 1. Whether you choose a text message, email, social media message, Skype session, or a Google+ Hangouts depends on who you need to communicate with and why—purpose and audience. 2. Email won’t always work. 3. Hit the Print Screen button near your number pad on a keyboard on Windows. 4. Know what it means to be Rick Roll’d, the difference between a fail and an epic fail, why Steve is a scumbag, and who sad Keannu is. 5. Not everyone loves technology. An RT as an olive branch. 6. 7. Tone is lost when you type. 8. This is dead-simple, but you never know. 9. 10. 11. 12.

» Use the Pygmalion Effect to Create a High Performing Team the awesome culture blog “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton The Pygmalion Effect Study In the 1960s, Harvard psychology professor Robert Rosenthal teamed up with South San Francisco elementary school principal Lenore Jacobson to conduct what later became known as the Pygmalion Effect study. “When teachers expect students to do well and show intellectual growth, they do; when teachers do not have such expectations, performance and growth are not so encouraged and may in fact be discouraged in a variety of ways.” Later studies revealed that when teachers have higher expectations of students, they unconsciously give more positive attention, feedback, and learning opportunities to those students. Marva Collins Marva Collins, one of the most extraordinary educators of the 20th century, offers another example of the Pygmalion Effect in action. Pygmalion in Management J. “A manager’s expectations are key to a subordinate’s performance and development.” The Golem Effect (Pygmalion in Reverse) 1. 2.

10 Ways to Deal with Difficult Students We all have those students who are habitually in trouble or are making trouble. This classroom management post is for all the teachers who struggle to reach those kids who snarl when you look at them, recoil when you are near them, and refuse to do what they are asked. Here are ten classroom management suggestions on how to deal with these difficult students: Stay in contact with parents Make sure they know what is going on; how often he is in trouble, and what trouble it was. A few teacher interview questions that you should be able to answer without... Some experts and educators favor the elimination of grades. Teaching strategies to ensure that your introverted students are feeling valued... Here are a few things that teachers shouldn’t be doing this summer break. A few classroom management ways to model effectively. Use proximity to limit negative actions When at all possible, place the student nearest you (hard when you are immersed in PBL) or stay within close proximity to him.

Lee Kraus' Blog | Learning Online Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?] Bloom’s Taxonomy divides the way people learn into three domains. From: UMUC From: Stewards Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy Task Oriented Question Construction Wheel Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy. ©2001 St. From: GA Tech According to Benjamin Bloom, and his colleagues, there are six levels of cognition: Knowledge: rote memorization, recognition, or recall of facts Comprehension: understanding what the facts mean Application: correct use of the facts, rules, or ideas Analysis: breaking down information into component parts Synthesis: combination of facts, ideas, or information to make a new whole Evaluation: judging or forming an opinion about the information or situation

Helping Students Motivate Themselves to Learn Every day, teachers face students who are apparently uninterested in learning. This is a challenge that must be overcome, because every student must be included in meaningful classroom activities. But the students seem to subconsciously decide each day what they will and will not learn. They are much more likely to grasp and retain what they encounter in class if they are motivated to do so. What is Motivation? Motivation is a person’s willingness to make a certain effort toward achieving a specific goal under specific circumstances. A Comfortable Environment In creating those circumstances, the educator should know that what his/her students most value in the classroom are relationship, trust, and respect. Know the Students The teacher should get to know the students well, listen to them, and seek their input regarding the lessons and curriculum in general. Engage Them with Choice Students like to be engaged. Connect the Lesson to Life References

21 Signs You’re a 21st Century Teacher Are you a 21st Century Teacher? Find out! PLUS if you can help me add to my list you may win a special $200 prize. Keep reading to find out how... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. BONUS 22: You're a member of the Teacher Learning Community...or have encouraged a teacher to join! SPECIAL PRIZE ---> If this post receives 100 comments (within 2 weeks of post date) with additional signs of being a 21st century teacher, I will pick one person at random to receive a FREE pass to the Teacher Learning Community and a runner up to receive an "I Heart EdTech" t-shirt. Share this post with your friends and colleagues:

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