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Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : Shots - Health Blog

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform : Shots - Health Blog
hide captionTeachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors. iStockphoto.com Teachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors. In my Morning Edition story today, I look at expectations — specifically, how teacher expectations can affect the performance of the children they teach. The first psychologist to systematically study this was a Harvard professor named Robert Rosenthal, who in 1964 did a wonderful experiment at an elementary school south of San Francisco. The idea was to figure out what would happen if teachers were told that certain kids in their class were destined to succeed, so Rosenthal took a normal IQ test and dressed it up as a different test. "It was a standardized IQ test, Flanagan's Test of General Ability," he says. After the kids took the test, he then chose from every class several children totally at random.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/09/18/161159263/teachers-expectations-can-influence-how-students-perform

Related:  Classroom ManagementTeachingtmoses1DOK/Cognitive Rigor/High Expectations

Building Resiliency in Struggling Students: 7 Key Ideas from Research In the coming weeks, millions of students across the country will return to school. Countless numbers of them will be labeled with such terms as at-risk or high-risk for academic failure or inappropriate behavior. As educators, we strive to find interventions, strategies, and programs that will help these students be successful. Resiliency can be defined as the ability to persist in the face of adversity or the ability to bounce back after facing a challenging situation. Helping students develop resiliency skills and attitudes has a positive effect on academic achievement, behavior, and long-term success in life (Hanson & Austin, 2003).

» Use the Pygmalion Effect to Create a High Performing Team the awesome culture blog “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton The Pygmalion Effect Study In the 1960s, Harvard psychology professor Robert Rosenthal teamed up with South San Francisco elementary school principal Lenore Jacobson to conduct what later became known as the Pygmalion Effect study. In the study, 20% of the students within each of 18 elementary school classrooms were randomly assigned to a ‘high achiever’ group, with the remaining 80% serving as the control group. The teachers in those classrooms were told that these particular students in the ‘high achiever’ group had a superior IQ; even though the students were in fact chosen at random.

36 Things Every 21st Century Teacher Should Be Able To Do What should every teacher in the 21st century know and be able to do? That’s an interesting question. After just now seeing this excellent post on educatorstechnology.com, I thought I’d contribute to the conversation. I added the twist of ranking them from least complex to most complex, so novices can start at the bottom, and you veterans out there can skip right to 36. 36 Things Every 21st Century Teacher Should Be Able To Do 1. Writing Objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy Various researchers have summarized how to use Bloom’s Taxonomy. Following are four interpretations that you can use as guides in helping to write objectives using Bloom’s Taxonomy. From: KC Metro [old link, no longer functioning?]

10 Ways to Deal with Difficult Students We all have those students who are habitually in trouble or are making trouble. This classroom management post is for all the teachers who struggle to reach those kids who snarl when you look at them, recoil when you are near them, and refuse to do what they are asked. Here are ten classroom management suggestions on how to deal with these difficult students: Stay in contact with parents Make sure they know what is going on; how often he is in trouble, and what trouble it was. Create this bond and you won’t regret it. What is PBL? Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. In Gold Standard PBL, Essential Project Design Elements include: Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills - The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management. Challenging Problem or Question - The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge. Sustained Inquiry - Students engage in a rigorous, extended process of asking questions, finding resources, and applying information. Authenticity - The project features real-world context, tasks and tools, quality standards, or impact – or speaks to students’ personal concerns, interests, and issues in their lives.

21 Signs You’re a 21st Century Teacher Are you a 21st Century Teacher? Find out! PLUS if you can help me add to my list you may win a special $200 prize. Designing Science Class for a Growth Mindset Join us for this free 1-hour discussion of Carol Dweck’s research on Mindset and its implications for classrooms implementing the next generation science standards in K-12. We’ll discuss the authentic focus of these performance standards which challenge students (and some teachers) who just want to get “the right answer.” Discover the ways we can use a new definition of rigor to enhance the reward of hands-on science and engineering, focusing and investing students in their own learning. Key Take-Aways: The difference between a growth and a fixed mindset How to use the power of effort and challenge to engage students in science and engineering practicesHow higher order teaching leads to the development of higher order thinking skills

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