background preloader

Home

Home
Bill Dana was an aeronautical engineer and a test pilot. He was an astronaut. His career at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station (now Armstrong Flight Research Center) began on Oct. 1, 1958; the same day NASA came into being. He piloted some of the agency's most remarkable craft and was with us from the agency's infancy through the maturity of the Space Shuttle and the creation of the International Space Station. Bill retired on May 29, 1998, a few months shy of 40 years of distinguished service. He passed away Tues., May 6, 2014, at the age of 83.

http://www.nasa.gov/

Related:  AstronomyCielos y SuelosScience Websites

Origins: Series Overview Origins: Back to the Beginning September 29, 2004 NEIL deGRASSE TYSON (Astrophysicist): A hellish, fiery wasteland, a molten planet hostile to life, yet somehow, amazingly, this is where we got our start. How? NASA Releases New WISE Mission Catalog of Entire Infrared Sky NASA Releases New WISE Mission Catalog of Entire Infrared Sky This is a mosaic of the images covering the entire sky as observed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), part of its All-Sky Data Release. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA › Full image and caption › Rectangular view

Science for celebrities In January 2007, exasperated by the tide of influential and misleading claims made by celebrities in the public sphere, we worked with scientists to produce Making Sense of Science for Celebrities. Each year since, Sense About Science has reviewed the odd science claims people in the public eye have made - about diets, cancer, magnets, radiation and more - sent in to us by scientists and members of the public. Many of these claims promote theories, therapies and campaigns that make no scientific sense. We ask scientists to respond, to help the celebrities realise where they are going wrong and to help the public to make sense of celebrity claims. “We seem to be seeing a celebrity divide on science.

WFCAM Science Archive UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) Mosaic - DR7 The main window below displays a 6 billion pixel (1 arcsec pixels) mosaic of the GPS (centre: l=52, b=0 (109 > l > 0 ,360 > l > 355 and -2.5 < b < +2.5). Use the controls in the main window or the mouse (click&drag ) to move around the image and zoom in and out. Space news and outer space articles from New Scientist - New Scientist Space Cookies on the New Scientist website close Our website uses cookies, which are small text files that are widely used in order to make websites work more effectively. Astronomy Resources Subject Tracer Information Blog Astronomy Resources (AstronomyResources.info) is a Subject Tracer™ Information Blog developed and created by the Virtual Private Library™. It is designed to bring together the latest resources and sources on an ongoing basis from the Internet for astronomical resources which are listed below. We always welcome suggestions of additional sites and resources to be added to this comprehensive listing and please submit by clicking here. This site has been developed and maintained by Marcus P. Zillman, M.S., A.M.H.A.; Internet expert, author, keynote speaker, and consultant. His latest white papers include Searching the Internet, Academic and Scholar Search Engines and Sources, and Knowledge Discovery Resources 2014.

Sun Shadow Applet More details: "Azimuth and Elevation Diagrams" Sun Azimuth at Rise and Set How to get this applet The length and the direction of the shadow depend on the elevation (altitude) and azimuth angle of the sun: In nautics, the azimuth is measured eastwards from the North point, in astronomy westwards from the South point. Object height is 10 m, elevation angle is 27°, sun azimuth angle is 270°: Foundational Questions Institute The Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) To catalyze, support, and disseminate research on questions at the foundations of physics and cosmology, particularly new frontiers and innovative ideas integral to a deep understanding of reality but unlikely to be supported by conventional funding sources. FQXi has five goals: {*style:<ul style="padding-left:20px;"><li>

Asteroid Watch Recent News February 5, 2015NASA's Dawn spacecraft, on approach to dwarf planet Ceres, has acquired its latest and closest-yet snapshot of this mysterious world. › Read more January 27, 2015NASA's Dawn spacecraft has returned the sharpest images ever seen of the dwarf planet Ceres. › Read more January 22, 2015There has been a significant increase in the amount of water "pouring" out of the Rosetta mission's comet. › Read more › More news

Through the Wormhole: Is There an Edge to the Universe? It is commonly theorized that the universe began with the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. But since we can only see as far as light has traveled in that time, we can't actually make out the edge of the universe. Could it be that the universe is infinite? Is there any way to find out what the shape of the universe really is? Can we find the edge, discover what might lie beyond it, and perhaps even discover a universe next to ours?

Orion Constellation Image Orion Csillagkép Photos Pictures Orion Stars © Image provided by Matthew Spinelli Hit an arrow button, first... Octans Constellation Pegasus Constellation Aps Childhood Stress Leaves Genetic Scars Traumatic experiences in early life can leave emotional scars. But a new study suggests that violence in childhood may leave a genetic mark as well. Researchers have found that children who are physically abused and bullied tend to have shorter telomeres—structures at the tips of chromosomes whose shrinkage has been linked to aging and disease. Telomeres prevent DNA strands from unravelling, much like the plastic aglets on a shoelace. When cells divide, these structures grow shorter, limiting the number of times a cell can reproduce.

Related:  subrat110bpiiyasEducationPSCHMTeaching ResourcesRocketsSpazioDinasoleidaperezNASASPACE The Final FrontierEspaçophilipyoungSpace ExplorationAstronomie et Physiqueastronomia