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Mysteries in slow motion: Videos offer a glimpse into an aerial world we never see By Daily Mail Reporter Updated: 00:27 GMT, 15 January 2012 A series of high-speed animal flight videos are producing an amazing glimpse aerial world most of us have never seen before. Amateurs videographers, with a bit of luck, can use inexpensive digital cameras to turn blurred images into clear illustrations of animal and insect behaviour. A Dutch programme named Vilegkunstenaars asked videographers and animal lovers around the world to capture nature in flight, digg.com reports. They sent high speed video tools to amateurs and the results that came back were stunning. Scroll down for videos

Solar System, Solar System Information Our Cosmic Neighborhood From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years. Ancient astronomers observed points of light that appeared to move among the stars. They called these objects "planets," meaning wanderers, and named them after Roman deities—Jupiter, king of the gods; Mars, the god of war; Mercury, messenger of the gods; Venus, the goddes of love and beauty, and Saturn, father of Jupiter and god of agriculture. Heliocentric and Geocentric Motion At the left the applet is simulating the Copernican heliocentric model of the solar system, whereas the simulation at the right is showing the motion from the geocentric point of view, propagated by Tycho Brahe (Tychonic model). Both models are equivalent, and both of them decscribe the phases of the Planets correctly. The Ptolemaic Model The phases of the planets as seen by Ptolemy's model are not correct.

Meteorites delivered gold to Earth 8 September 2011Last updated at 18:24 By Leila Battison Science reporter A burst of meteorite impacts around 3.9 billion years ago delivered precious metals to Earth Scientists have shown that the Earth's surface became enriched with precious metals by impacting meteorites. The Earth's crust and mantle has considerably more gold than expected from favoured models of planetary formation. Monster Galaxy Cluster 'El Gordo' Packs Mass of 2 Quadrillion Suns AUSTIN, Texas — The largest cluster of galaxies seen yet in the early universe, a giant that astronomers have dubbed "El Gordo," could one day reveal secrets about the invisible dark matter that fills the universe, researchers said. El Gordo — which means "the fat one" in Spanish — is officially known as ACT-CL J0102-4915 and "is located more than 7 billion light-years from Earth, at a time when the universe was half its current age," study co-author John Patrick Hughes at Rutgers University told SPACE.com. The universe is about 13.7 billion years old. The monster galaxy cluster has mass about 2 quadrillion (that's 2 followed by 15 zeroes) times that of the sun, making it "the most massive known cluster in the distant universe." A galaxy cluster behemoth

Tûranor PlanetSolar: World's Largest Solar Ship Set to Complete Trip Around the World The epic voyage of the Tûranor PlanetSolar – the world’s largest solar-powered boat – will soon come to a close as the ship closes in on its final stretch. The Swiss vessel is a full-bore high-tech solar harvesting machine whose deck is covered in 537 square meters of photovoltaic panels. The array produced enough energy for the boat to navigate the entire circumference of the Earth without any other means of energy. The Tûranor PlanetSolar is currently set to depart Abu Dhabi en route to their final port in Morocco – the same place the expedition launched on September 27th, 2010. The journey has come full circle in more than one respect, as it was not too long ago the only way to navigate the earth was by harnessing renewable energy with sails.

Wallpaper Search Picture Album Wallpaper Show Titles Some black holes may be older than time Stuart Gary for ABC Science Online Updated Fri 6 May 2011, 5:48pm AEST An intriguing new hypothesis suggests some black holes could have formed before the formation of our universe. The work by Professor Bernard Carr from Queen Mary University in London and Professor Alan Coley from Canada's Dalhousie University, examines a cosmology in which the universe goes through cycles of birth and death. According to their work published on the pre-press website arXiv.org, some black holes could be remnants of a previous universe that collapsed in a big crunch and was then reborn in the big bang - 13.7 billion years ago.

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