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Galaxy Zoo

Galaxy Zoo

https://www.galaxyzoo.org/

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Universe has 2 trillion galaxies, astronomers say There are a dizzying two trillion galaxies in the universe, up to 20 times more than previously thought, astronomers reported on Thursday. The surprising finding, based on 3D modeling of images collected over 20 years by the Hubble Space Telescope, was published in the Astronomical Journal. Scientists have puzzled over how many galaxies the cosmos harbors at least since US astronomer Edwin Hubble showed in 1924 that Andromeda, a neighboring galaxy, was not part of our own Milky Way. But even in the era of modern astronomy, getting an accurate tally has proven difficult. To begin with, there is only part of the cosmos where light given off by distant objects has had time to reach Earth.

No. 41 - 2011: You Can Participate in Astronomy Research Projects You Can Participate in Astronomy Research Projects Finding Exoplanets: The graph in this illustration shows how the light we see from a star decreases slightly when one of its planets crosses the star’s disk. Planet hunters sometimes use this transit technique to find exoplanets. Art by Karen Teramura. You don't have to be a professional astronomer, or even own a telescope, to participate in a myriad of astronomy research projects.

Crowdsourcing Crowdsourcing is a sourcing model in which individuals or organizations obtain goods and services. These services include ideas and finances, from a large, relatively open and often rapidly-evolving group of internet users; it divides work between participants to achieve a cumulative result. The word crowdsourcing itself is a portmanteau of crowd and outsourcing, and was coined in 2005.[1][2][3][4] As a mode of sourcing, crowdsourcing existed prior to the digital age (i.e. Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2016 April 15 Mercury and Crescent Moon Set Image Credit & Copyright: Miguel Claro (TWAN, Dark Sky Alqueva) Explanation: Innermost planet Mercury and a thin crescent Moon are never found far from the Sun in planet Earth's skies. Taken near dusk on April 8, this colorful evening skyscape shows them both setting toward the western horizon just after the Sun.

News Blog - Mike Lynch's "Exploding" Telescope Here's a cautionary story about someone who was careful with his observing gear — and still got burned. Some of you probably know (or know of) Mike Lynch, an avid amateur astronomer who hosts frequent star parties in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. He's the author of several skywatching books, writes a column for the Twin Cities' Pioneer Press, and hosts an astronomy website. Why the multiverse is all about you - The Philosopher's Zone In general, quantum physicists don't have much truck with big conceptual schemes. But one of their own has broken rank. Christopher Fuchs tells Joe Gelonesi how a particular school of 20th century philosophy helps him make quantum leaps. Quantum mechanics can be tough to get your head round.

Sun for All Project download poster The project “Sun for all”, funded by Ciência Viva (2005 117/ 18) aims to promote science in general and astronomy in particular, among students. The project rests on the asset of over 30000 Sun images (spectroheliograms) that are kept in the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Coimbra, as a result of a work of over 80 years of daily solar observations that started in 1926. Presently there are about 15000 digitised images that are available to the general public due to another project, also funded by “Ciência Viva”, which was developed from 2002 to 2004. The solar observations collection has an enormous scientific value. Thus, this project aims to make this collection available in a digital way via WWW to Portuguese and foreign students, as well as a set of activities that enables them to use these images, in order to introduce them to the scientific method, having the Sun and its atmosphere as the background (see in "SUPPORTING MATERIAL").

Microwork Microwork is a series of small tasks which together comprise a large unified project, and are completed by many people over the Internet. [1] [2] Microwork is considered the smallest unit of work in a virtual assembly line. [3] It is most often used to describe tasks for which no efficient algorithm has been devised, and require human intelligence to complete reliably. The term was developed in 2008 by Leila Chirayath Janah of Samasource. [4] [5] Microtasking[edit] Hubble data predicts Milky Way galactic collision When Galaxies Collide! It sounds like an early science fiction novel. However, analysis of Hubble measurements shows that our own Milky Way galaxy is moving toward a head-on collision with our nearest neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy (also known as M31). The collision will start in about four billion years, and over the following three billion years the two spiral galaxies will coalesce into a large elliptical galaxy. Based on this data, NASA has produced a video of the upcoming collision. View all

NASA-engineered collision spills new Moon secrets Scientists led by Brown University are offering the first detailed explanation of the crater formed when a NASA rocket slammed into the Moon last fall and information about the composition of the lunar soil at the poles that never has been sampled. The findings are published in a set of papers in Science stemming from the successful NASA mission, called LCROSS for Lunar CRater Observing and Sensing Satellite. Peter Schultz and graduate student Brendan Hermalyn analyzed data from bits of the Moon’s surface kicked up by a NASA-engineered collision. They found unexpected complexity — and traces of silver.

The Edge Of The Universe Is Closer Than Scientists Previously Thought The visible universe just shrunk by 320 million light-years in all directions, updating a famous calculation that physicists first made 13 years ago. If you're trying to calculate the size of the cosmos, the speed of light — the fastest anything can go — is a tempting place to begin and end. You'd reason that since the Big Bang happened some 13.8 billion years ago, there's a 13.8-billion-light-year radius marking the edge of what mere mortals could see.

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