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Bill Dana was an aeronautical engineer and a test pilot. He was an astronaut. His career at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station (now Armstrong Flight Research Center) began on Oct. 1, 1958; the same day NASA came into being. He piloted some of the agency's most remarkable craft and was with us from the agency's infancy through the maturity of the Space Shuttle and the creation of the International Space Station. Bill retired on May 29, 1998, a few months shy of 40 years of distinguished service. He passed away Tues., May 6, 2014, at the age of 83.

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People: Featured People: Carl Sagan Carl Sagan played a leading role in the American space program from its very beginning. He was a consultant and adviser to NASA beginning in the 1950s -- he briefed the Apollo astronauts before their flights to the Moon. Carl was born in New York City on November 9, 1934. Science for celebrities In January 2007, exasperated by the tide of influential and misleading claims made by celebrities in the public sphere, we worked with scientists to produce Making Sense of Science for Celebrities. Each year since, Sense About Science has reviewed the odd science claims people in the public eye have made - about diets, cancer, magnets, radiation and more - sent in to us by scientists and members of the public. Many of these claims promote theories, therapies and campaigns that make no scientific sense.

Asteroid Watch Recent News February 5, 2015NASA's Dawn spacecraft, on approach to dwarf planet Ceres, has acquired its latest and closest-yet snapshot of this mysterious world. › Read more January 27, 2015NASA's Dawn spacecraft has returned the sharpest images ever seen of the dwarf planet Ceres. › Read more January 22, 2015There has been a significant increase in the amount of water "pouring" out of the Rosetta mission's comet. › Read more › More news Next Five Close Approaches Average distance between Earth and the moon is about 239,000 miles (385,000 kilometers).

NASAs 'Curiosity' Search for Life Targets Water-Altered Rock This rock's composition is unlike any other Opportunity has investigated during nine years on Mars -- higher in aluminum and silica, lower in calcium and iron. "Based on our current solar-array dust models, we intend to reach an area of 15 degrees northerly tilt before Opportunity's sixth Martian winter," said JPL's Scott Lever, mission manager. "Solander Point gives us that tilt and may allow us to move around quite a bit for winter science observations." Northerly tilt increases output from the rover's solar panels during southern-hemisphere winter. Daily sunshine for Opportunity will reach winter minimum in February 2014.

Foundational Questions Institute The Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) To catalyze, support, and disseminate research on questions at the foundations of physics and cosmology, particularly new frontiers and innovative ideas integral to a deep understanding of reality but unlikely to be supported by conventional funding sources. FQXi has five goals: {*style:<ul style="padding-left:20px;"><li> To expand the purview of scientific inquiry to include scientific disciplines fundamental to a deep understanding of reality, but which are currently largely unsupported by conventional grant sources To redress incrementalism in research programming by establishing or expanding new "islands" of understanding via flexible funding of high-risk, high-reward research in these areas

ROSAT Re-entry ROSAT (short for Röntgensatellit, in German X-rays are called Röntgenstrahlen, in honour of Wilhelm Röntgen) is a defunct German Aerospace Center-led satellite X-ray telescope, with instruments built by Germany, the UK and the US. It was launched on 1 June 1990, on a Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral, on what was initially designed as an 18 month mission, with provision for up to 5 years of operation. ROSAT actually operated for over 8 years, finally shutting down on 12 February 1999. ROSAT is expected to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere between October 21 and 23 2011. In February 2011, it was reported that the 2,400 kg satellite was unlikely to burn up entirely while re-entering the earth atmosphere due to the large amount of ceramics and glass used in construction. Parts as heavy as 400 kg could impact the surface intact.[1]

Kepler Mission To Find Earth-like Planets By Studying Planetary Transits Earlier this week we spoke about finding Earth-like planets, and how hard it is to find them. We would like to see other planets similar to Earth, and we have a few absolutely necessary conditions: the planet must be rocky, solid, dense like Earth, a source of power like a Sun, chemicals resulted from volcanic activity, and liquid water. The most important thing however, is that the planet must be located in the Goldilocks zone, the area where the planet is not too far and not too close from a star. In order to find such planets NASA has begun the Kepler Mission which will last four year. The Kepler Mission consists of observing 100,000 Sun-like stars, and to be more accurate: scientists will study the so-called planetary transits.

Start Page - The Faculty of Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden The Faculty of Science The Faculty of Science includes all the major subject areas in the fields of mathematics and natural sciences. With 6 500 students and 730 employees it is the second largest Faculty at the University of Gothenburg. Visualization Explorer for the iPad - Home The NASA Visualization Explorer features visualizations, animations and images of our sun and the universe. Story topics include findings from NASA spacecraft exploring Earth, the planets and beyond. World premiere content delivered right to your fingertips produced exclusively for the NASA Visualization Explorer app.

Top Sites That Make Science Awesome posted by Elizabeth Harper on April 24, 2013 in Internet & Networking, Computers and Software, Family and Parenting, Kids, Guides & Reviews, Fab Websites :: 0 comments Though you may remember science class as dull, much has changed. The Internet has done the impossible and made science a lot more accessible, bringing scientists and science enthusiasts together to share and discuss the most interesting discoveries of the day. Online, you can find fascinating science news and explanations on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and more if you know where to look—and it's all a lot more interesting than any high school science textbook. Here's the best of what's out there.

WFCAM Science Archive UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) Mosaic - DR7 The main window below displays a 6 billion pixel (1 arcsec pixels) mosaic of the GPS (centre: l=52, b=0 (109 > l > 0 ,360 > l > 355 and -2.5 < b < +2.5). Use the controls in the main window or the mouse (click&drag ) to move around the image and zoom in and out. Click on the small images on the left to move to that point in the mosaic. Other versions: dr6 release dr4 release dr3 release dr2 release l'univers et ses mystères au COMPLET en haute definition Les plus grandes explosions HD 720p / Nouveau documentaire science complet en francais by DocMeFiLDraGoN3 47,053 views Documentaire science issu de : l'univers et ses mystères ceci est l'episode 47Science documentary : the universe and its mysteries this is episode 47 Full documentary subscribe and like please thx With all the documentaries available on my channel, you can learn more about astronomy, space, time, matter and many answers to questions that may arise are all like: is it possible to see black holes, and then how the big bang emerged from the first moment (because that triggered ca can not be a supreme deity) scientists will tell you (the majority), the role of supernovae, constellations , nebulae, the speed of light, the moon, the galaxy, the Milky Way, the solar system, atoms, dark matter, dark energy (black), gravity (gravity), asteroids, stars, star clusters, the discoveries of Albert Einstein, the hubble satellite imagery and many others .

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