background preloader

Navdanya

Navdanya
Navdanya means “ nine seeds ” (symbolizing protection of biological and cultural diversity) and also the “ new gift ” (for seed as commons, based on the right to save and share seed s In today’s context of biological and ecological destruction, seed savers are the true givers of seed. This gift or “dana” of Navadhanyas (nine seeds) is the ultimate gift – it is a gift of life, of heritage and continuity. Conserving seed is conserving biodiversity, conserving knowledge of the seed and its utilization, conserving culture, conserving sustainability. Navdanya is a network of seed keepers and organic producers spread across 16 states in India. Navdanya has helped set up 65 community seed banks across the country, trained over 5,00,000 farmers in seed sovereignty , food sovereignty and sustainable agriculture over the past two decades, and helped setup the largest direct marketing, fair trade organic network in the country.

http://www.navdanya.org/

Related:  Food (in)security, consumption, health & sustainabilityStuff that mattersMOUVEMENTS

The biggest cause of global warming that nobody’s talking about LAST UPDATED: 21 August 2015 Even if Prime Minister Tony Abbott hasn’t come around to the idea yet, most of us would agree that if we want planet Earth to sustain life for generations to come, we need cleaner energy. We need cleaner energy to fuel our cars, our homes, our cities… If advances in green tech can overcome these challenges, we will have solved a big piece of the climate puzzle. But not all the big pieces… See this turtle's miraculous recovery after getting caught in a piece of litter. When it comes to prioritizing environmental concerns, curbing litter isn't exactly at the top of the list. After all, when there are much bigger dangers like harmful emissions, overfishing, and climate change to worry about, how much harm are a few pieces of plastic on the ground really going to do? Just splitting a sixer of Strawberry Crush with my bros. What's the worst that could happen? Photo by iStock.

Mobile Apps for Exploring Nature This post appears courtesy of SciStarter, a blog and online resource for citizen scientists. I often get sidetracked after using the W-A-L-K word out loud in front of my dog. Sometimes, I am looking for misplaced sneakers or sunglasses, but today I am downloading a few citizen science apps to my iPhone in hopes of turning our midday walk into an urban naturalist adventure. Mila, a fluffy herding mix, sits at attention, impatiently staring at me with her “didn’t you say we were going for a walk?” expression as I poke at the phone and the app icons appear on the screen. For most dogs and the people attached to the far end of their leashes, a walk around the neighborhood is a regular part of the day.

What We Do - Rebellious Truth So What the Friggins Do We Do? Rebellious Truths is a social movement for truth, integrity and accountability in our political and media systems, and our culture at large. We are educating the populace on the major issues they are not being informed about, or being misinformed about, that are essential to their proper self-governance and livelihood. We are breaking down the walls of rigid dogma and falsehoods that have prevented us from coming together and finding sustainable solutions for all.

A Map Of Where Your Food Originated May Surprise You Some people may be dimly aware that Thailand's chilies and Italy's tomatoes — despite being central to their respective local cuisines — originated in South America. Now, for the first time, a new study reveals the full extent of globalization in our food supply. More than two-thirds of the crops that underpin national diets originally came from somewhere else — often far away. And that trend has accelerated over the past 50 years. Colin Khoury, a plant scientist at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (known by its Spanish acronym CIAT) and the U.S.

EARTHWORKS Earthworks' Mission Earthworks is a nonprofit organization dedicated to protecting communities and the environment from the adverse impacts of mineral and energy development while promoting sustainable solutions. Earthworks stands for clean air, water and land, healthy communities, and corporate accountability. We work for solutions that protect both the Earth’s resources and our communities. Press releases - Turing's Sunflowers Thursday 22 March 2012 Thousands of sunflowers will be planted in honour of the mathematician Alan Turing as part of a new research project led by MOSI (Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester) and Manchester Science Festival, in association with The University of Manchester. A hundred years after Turing was born families, schools, community groups and businesses will be encouraged to plant over 3000 sunflowers to celebrate his work and help solve a mathematical riddle that he worked on before his death in 1954.

Is Eating Organic Really Better for You and the Environment? On average, organic food items are 47 percent more expensive than standard supermarket fare—but thanks to their purported health and environmental benefits, many shoppers still splurge on them. In fact, the total retail market for organic products in the United States was valued at over $39 billion in 2016. But while the organic industry means big business for farmers and food companies, the question still remains: Are organic foods actually better for both you and the environment? In the video below, AsapSCIENCE co-creator and host Mitchell Moffit explains why eating organic may not be the panacea most people think it is. American Academy of Pediatrics Cuts Ties with Monsanto Months ago Mamavation learned that the American Academy of Pediatrics was in a sponsorship relationship with Monsanto, a chemical company and makers of DDT, PCBs, Agent Orange, glyphosate & GMOs. In fact, Monsanto has been deemed the 3rd most hated company in the United States by the Harris Poll this year measuring “reputation quotient” which basically means how people feel about them. Baffled by this relationship, Mamavation founder Leah Segedie contacted the AAP through a close friend and colleague and was put in touch with their Public Affairs team. “I was completely shocked that the American Academy of Pediatrics, an organization that moms put their trust in at some of the most vulnerable times in their lives was associating with a company that didn’t elicit trust at all.

MyHeartMap Challenge The Device That Saves Lives, But Can Be Hard to Find November 12, 2012 | By Ron Winslow If you needed an automated external defibrillator to help a victim of sudden cardiac arrest, chances are you would have trouble finding one, even if a device were located nearby. That's despite the fact that about one million AEDs—portable devices that can jump-start the heart and save lives when sudden cardiac arrest strikes—are installed in office buildings, malls, schools and sports stadiums around the U.S. <read more>

New Online Calculator Reveals the Full Impact of Your Meat Intake by Robin Scher – February 14, 2018 One person's meat-eating can take a big toll on animals, climate, and health over time This article originally appeared on Alternet. One of my resolutions this year is to eat less meat. As a lifelong carnivore, this task has already proven to be easier said than done. The major challenge comes down to changing my habits. 12 Life Lessons from a Man Who's Seen 12000 Deaths Rooted in the hearts of many Hindus is the belief that if you breathe your last in Kashi (Varanasi) you attain what is popularly known as ‘Kashi Labh’ or ‘the fruit of Kashi’—moksh or “release from the cycle of rebirth impelled by the law of karma”. Kashi Labh Mukti Bhawan in Varanasi is one of the three guesthouses in the city where people check in to die. The other two are Mumukshu Bhawan and Ganga Labh Bhawan. Established in 1908, Mukti Bhawan is well-known within the city and outside. Bhairav Nath Shukla has been the Manager of Mukti Bhawan for 44 years. He has seen the rich and the poor take refuge in the guesthouse in their final days as they await death and hope to find peace.

American Gut In the summer of 2008, a 26-year-old man from Shanxi Province walked into a lab at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and 23 weeks later walked out 113 pounds lighter. He had not participated in a clinical trial of some new secret weight loss pill, or signed up for a punishing Biggest Loser-style exercise program, nor had he been fussed over by behavioral scientists who made his plates and drinking cups smaller with each passing week. The researchers, who were microbiologists, had simply put the man’s gut microbes on a diet.

Related: