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Navdanya

Navdanya
Navdanya means “ nine seeds ” (symbolizing protection of biological and cultural diversity) and also the “ new gift ” (for seed as commons, based on the right to save and share seed s In today’s context of biological and ecological destruction, seed savers are the true givers of seed. This gift or “dana” of Navadhanyas (nine seeds) is the ultimate gift – it is a gift of life, of heritage and continuity. Conserving seed is conserving biodiversity, conserving knowledge of the seed and its utilization, conserving culture, conserving sustainability. Navdanya is a network of seed keepers and organic producers spread across 16 states in India. Navdanya has helped set up 65 community seed banks across the country, trained over 5,00,000 farmers in seed sovereignty , food sovereignty and sustainable agriculture over the past two decades, and helped setup the largest direct marketing, fair trade organic network in the country.

http://www.navdanya.org/

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