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Deep ecology

Deep ecology
Deep ecology is a contemporary ecological and environmental philosophy characterized by its advocacy of the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs, and advocacy for a radical restructuring of modern human societies in accordance with such ideas. Deep ecology argues that the natural world is a subtle balance of complex inter-relationships in which the existence of organisms is dependent on the existence of others within ecosystems.[1] Human interference with or destruction of the natural world poses a threat therefore not only to humans but to all organisms constituting the natural order. Deep ecology's core principle is the belief that the living environment as a whole should be respected and regarded as having certain inalienable legal rights to live and flourish, independent of their utilitarian instrumental benefits for human use. Principles[edit] These principles can be refined down into three simple propositions: Development[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_ecology

Related:  that's interesting - hmmmEarth ParadigmEco CultureAppropriation of nature.

Scientists have figured out what we need to achieve secure quantum teleportation For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the precise requirements for secure quantum teleportation – and it involves a phenomenon known 'quantum steering', first proposed by Albert Einstein and Erwin Schrödinger. Before you get too excited, no, this doesn't mean we can now teleport humans like they do on Star Trek (sorry). Instead, this research will allow people to use quantum entanglement to send information across large distances without anyone else being able to eavesdrop. Which is almost as cool, because this is how we'll form the un-hackable communication networks of the future. Quantum teleportation isn't new in itself. Mobile Apps for Exploring Nature This post appears courtesy of SciStarter, a blog and online resource for citizen scientists. I often get sidetracked after using the W-A-L-K word out loud in front of my dog. Sometimes, I am looking for misplaced sneakers or sunglasses, but today I am downloading a few citizen science apps to my iPhone in hopes of turning our midday walk into an urban naturalist adventure.

The promise of a bio-based economy While consumers feel the pain at the pump, crude oil prices have more than doubled over the past five years, and economists continue to express concern that the volatile oil market hampers economic prosperity around the world. Politically, Europe’s dependence on oil and gas imported from Russia has severely limited the region’s ability to respond to the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. Yet our society's dependence on oil will be difficult to break. Despite high costs, hydrocarbons typically remain the cheapest source of energy on the planet. The most promising replacement – bio-based energy – is more viable than people think. For decades, scientists have known that organic biomass can be used to fuel cars, trucks and even airplanes. ROLSTON III_Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World by Holmes Rolston, III Published in: The Broken Circle: Ecology, Economics, Ethics.

Mass Extinction Underway Human beings are currently causing the greatest mass extinction of species since the extinction of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. If present trends continue one half of all species of life on earth will be extinct in less than 100 years, as a result of habitat destruction, pollution, invasive species, and climate change. (For details see links below.) Scientists Might Have Just Resolved The Mystery Of The Bermuda Triangle For the one and a half century, numerous ships and airplanes have disappeared in Bermuda Triangle area, usually under mysterious circumstances. But a new research from the scientists at Arctic University in Norway takes cues from the multiple giant craters on the floor of the Barents Sea. A massive deposit of methane gas may have exploded in the craters surrounding the seabed caused by gas leaking from oil and gas deposits buried deep in the sea floor. In the past two years, scientists have also documented methane gas bubbling up from the seafloor off the some parts of the west and the east coasts of the United States. One of the topics that need further analysis is whether methane gas explosions on the seabed could threaten the safety of ships. Multiple giant craters exist on the sea floor in an area in the west-central Barents Sea … and are probably a cause of enormous blowouts of gas.

Silent Spring Silent Spring is an environmental science book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on September 27, 1962.[1] The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring (1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public. The Cradle-to-Cradle Alternative By William McDonough & Michael Braungart, ©2003 from State of the World 2004 (Worldwatch / W.W. Norton, 2004) Imagine a world in which all the things we make, use, and consume provide nutrition for nature and industry—a world in which growth is good and human activity generates a delightful, restorative ecological footprint. While this may seem like heresy to many in the world of sustainable development, the destructive qualities of today’s cradle-to-grave industrial system can be seen as the result of a fundamental design problem, not the inevitable outcome of consumption and economic activity. Indeed, good design—principled design based on the laws of nature—can transform the making and consumption of things into a regenerative force.

Holmes Rolston III Holmes Rolston III (born November 19, 1932) is a philosopher who is University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Colorado State University. He is best known for his contributions to environmental ethics and the relationship between science and religion. Among other honors, Rolston won the 2003 Templeton Prize, awarded by Prince Philip in Buckingham Palace. He gave the Gifford Lectures, University of Edinburgh, 1997-1998. The Darwinian model is used to define the main thematic concepts in Rolston's philosophy and, in greater depth, the general trend of his thinking.[1] Quotes[edit]

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