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Deep ecology

Deep ecology
Deep ecology is a contemporary ecological and environmental philosophy characterized by its advocacy of the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs, and advocacy for a radical restructuring of modern human societies in accordance with such ideas. Deep ecology argues that the natural world is a subtle balance of complex inter-relationships in which the existence of organisms is dependent on the existence of others within ecosystems.[1] Human interference with or destruction of the natural world poses a threat therefore not only to humans but to all organisms constituting the natural order. Deep ecology's core principle is the belief that the living environment as a whole should be respected and regarded as having certain inalienable legal rights to live and flourish, independent of their utilitarian instrumental benefits for human use. Principles[edit] These principles can be refined down into three simple propositions: Development[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_ecology

Mobile Apps for Exploring Nature This post appears courtesy of SciStarter, a blog and online resource for citizen scientists. I often get sidetracked after using the W-A-L-K word out loud in front of my dog. Sometimes, I am looking for misplaced sneakers or sunglasses, but today I am downloading a few citizen science apps to my iPhone in hopes of turning our midday walk into an urban naturalist adventure.

ROLSTON III_Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World Environmental Ethics: Values in and Duties to the Natural World by Holmes Rolston, III Published in: The Broken Circle: Ecology, Economics, Ethics. Silent Spring Silent Spring is an environmental science book written by Rachel Carson and published by Houghton Mifflin on September 27, 1962.[1] The book documented the detrimental effects on the environment—particularly on birds—of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring (1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public.

Holmes Rolston III Holmes Rolston III (born November 19, 1932) is a philosopher who is University Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Colorado State University. He is best known for his contributions to environmental ethics and the relationship between science and religion. Among other honors, Rolston won the 2003 Templeton Prize, awarded by Prince Philip in Buckingham Palace. He gave the Gifford Lectures, University of Edinburgh, 1997-1998. The Darwinian model is used to define the main thematic concepts in Rolston's philosophy and, in greater depth, the general trend of his thinking.[1] Quotes[edit]

Gaia hypothesis The study of planetary habitability is partly based upon extrapolation from knowledge of the Earth's conditions, as the Earth is the only planet currently known to harbour life The Gaia hypothesis, also known as Gaia theory or Gaia principle, proposes that organisms interact with their inorganic surroundings on Earth to form a self-regulating, complex system that contributes to maintaining the conditions for life on the planet. Topics of interest include how the biosphere and the evolution of life forms affect the stability of global temperature, ocean salinity, oxygen in the atmosphere and other environmental variables that affect the habitability of Earth. Introduction[edit] Less accepted versions of the hypothesis claim that changes in the biosphere are brought about through the coordination of living organisms and maintain those conditions through homeostasis. In some versions of Gaia philosophy, all lifeforms are considered part of one single living planetary being called Gaia.

Environmental ethics Environmental ethics is the part of environmental philosophy which considers extending the traditional boundaries of ethics from solely including humans to including the non-human world. It exerts influence on a large range of disciplines including environmental law, environmental sociology, ecotheology, ecological economics, ecology and environmental geography. There are many ethical decisions that human beings make with respect to the environment. For example: Should we continue to clear cut forests for the sake of human consumption?

List of environmental organizations This is a list of the more notable environmental organizations by organization type (intergovernmental, governmental or non-governmental) and further subdivided by country. Intergovernmental organizations[edit] Worldwide[edit]

Darwinian Storied Residence. An introduction to the Work of Holmes Rolston III Attfield R. (2006). Creation, Evolution and Meaning, Aldershot, Ashgate. Gofffi J-Y. (2000). Closest Sun-Like Star May Have Livable Planet What's the Latest Development? Astronomers at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, have discovered that the closest single star like our Sun may have an habitable planet in its orbit. The star, called Tau Ceti, is just twelve light years from Earth and is believed to have five planets surrounding it, all between two and six times the mass of planet Earth. "One of the planets lies in the habitable zone of the star and has a mass around five times that of Earth, making it the smallest planet found to be orbiting in the habitable zone of any Sun-like star." The technique used to find the planets is new and twice as sensitive as past methods. What's the Big Idea?

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