background preloader

40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School

40 Maps They Didn’t Teach You In School
By the time we graduate high school, we learn that they never taught us the most interesting things in there. Sure, you might be able to name the European countries or point New York on the map, but does that give a you real understanding of how the world functions? To fill this gap, we have gathered a great and informative selection of infographical maps that they should’ve shown us at school: every single one of these maps reveals different fun and interesting facts, which can actually help you draw some pretty interesting conclusions. Show Full Text What makes infographical maps so engaging is how easy it becomes to conceive graphically presented information. The best part, there are brilliant services like Target Map that “allow everyone (from individuals to large organizations) to represent their data on maps of any country in the world and to share their knowledge with the whole Internet Community.” Trust us, these are way better than the ones they taught you at school!

http://www.boredpanda.com/fun-maps-they-didnt-teach-you-in-school/

Related:  Mapshumour geekcartes géographieBig PicturesSci-e-nce

If the World were 100 PEOPLE 50 would be female 50 would be male 26 would be children There would be 74 adults, 8 of whom would be 65 and olderThere would be: 60 Asians 15 Africans 14 people from the Americas 11 Europeans33 Christians 22 Muslims 14 Hindus 7 Buddhists 12 people who practice other religions 12 people who would not be aligned with a religion12 would speak Chinese 5 would speak Spanish 5 would speak English 3 would speak Arabic 3 would speak Hindi 3 would speak Bengali 3 would speak Portuguese 2 would speak Russian 2 would speak Japanese 62 would speak other languages83 would be able to read and write; 17 would not 7 would have a college degree 22 would own or share a computer77 people would have a place to shelter themfrom the wind and the rain, but 23 would not 1 would be dying of starvation 15 would be undernourished 21 would be overweight 87 would have access to safe drinking water 13 people would have no clean, safe water to drink

12 'No Nose' GIFs That Will Delight and Horrify You Remember when Grandpa would steal your nose as a kid? For the children who didn't get their honkers back, there's a place for them on Internet. The subreddit r/nonose/ features hilariously horrifying photos and GIFs that, as the name suggests, have no noses. Don't worry, people with weak stomachs, the de-nose-ification is done with the wizardry of Photoshop. We sniffed out 12 of the funniest (and most frightening) no nose GIFs for your eyeballs' pleasure. This Map of the World Just Won Japan’s Prestigious Design Award The 2016 Good Design Award results were announced recently with awards going to over 1000 entries in several different categories. But the coveted Grand Award of Japan’s most well-known design award, given to just 1 entry, was announced today. Last year the winner was a personal mobility chair and the year before that it was a robotic arm. This year, the grand prize went to a world map. But the map of the world has been around for hundreds of years. So what’s so special about this map?

Atlas of the World Wide Web - Aizendaf Atlas of the World Wide Web The Digital Revolution and information era have radically changed every aspect of our lives, and continue to shape our social structure. Within that spectrum, the internet stands out as a unique phenomenon which captures our hearts and minds. We use it as an extension of ourselves, granting it access into our most inner circles in the process. A major area where the impact of the internet is felt the most is the acceleration of globalization trends. As the world becomes smaller, physical borders seem to fade away. Big History Project Join us! The Big History Project is not a for-profit program. Your engagement will exclusively benefit teachers and students around the world. Teaching the course It's easy to teach Big History — all you have to do is register, set up a class, and go! Start a pilot

A Real Map of the Middle East Could this map be any more different from the previous one discussed on this blog? That one dealt with the water, wetlands and shifting shorelines of Louisiana. This one zooms in on lines in the sand of the Middle-Eastern desert. Yet both maps do something similar: knowing that our current maps no longer reflect reality, they replace their conventional wisdom with a new cartography, based on the new facts on the ground.

You Can't Do Binary Under Pressure Click your answer, or use the Q or P keys on your keyboard. You can also type Q or P to continue. Answer by clicking, or with Q and P. Earth - Explore satellite and aerial images of the Earth Zoom Earth shows new NASA satellite images every day. Explore satellite and aerial imagery of the Earth in a simple, zoomable interface. Zoom into near-live satellite images from NASA and Bing Maps. Previously known as Flash Earth. Where does the imagery come from? Bing Maps provides the high resolution imagery. Map of Science Looks Like Milky Way The pursuit of human knowledge has a shape. By crunching data from more than a billion user interactions on scholarly databases, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers produced a high-resolution map of the relationships between different fields of science. They’re not the first to map science, though they insist that their map is best. Other topographers of knowledge, they say, aren’t up to date on what modern scholars search for, and rely too much on natural science databases.

The Shape of Life This relatively obscure series (2002) is a real find. 7 hour long episodes tell the story of primarily invertebrates of the sea (sponges, anemones, flatworms, molluscs, arthropods, jellyfish, sea stars, etc...) over the course of time and how we relate and in some cases depend on these seemingly lowly creatures. Amazing video footage and computer graphics clearly explain everything. The scope of the video is worldwide. This is documentary film-making at its best. It's a shame it's not more widely known because it is easily as good as (better than, IMHO) PBS/BBC documentaries on the same subject. It covers the evolution of life on earth by explaining the gradual changes in anatomy (invertebrates to vertebrates, etc).

Global inequalities in population, wealth, and religious origin shown in six maps. This map of Canada shows the country's familiar vastness. A single line drawn across its deep south adds a surprising layer of information. The line runs well below the 49th parallel that constitutes that long straight stretch of U.S.-Canada border from Point Roberts, WA to Lake of the Woods, MN (see also #519). Split in two by the U.S. state of Maine poking north, the line traverses four eastern provinces, cutting off the southern extremities of Ontario, Québec and New Brunswick.

Related:  Infotainment - Great InfographicsProjekty i realizacje8geT