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Critical thinking web

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Nuclear Power Plant Demonstration by Henrik Eriksson The control-room operators of the Kärnobyl nuclear power plant are telecommuting and are running the plant through the Web. However, the mean time between failure for the components of Kärnobyl is not great. Try to keep the reactor stable when component failures occur! Brief Instructions Use sequence buttons 1-3 to run a failure-simulation sequence. Detailed Applet Description Nuclear Power Information Preparing for a Disaster Copyright © 1995-1996 Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

Return to the Haikyo- Asama Volcano Museum | Michael John Grist This was my second time to go to the Asama Volcano Museum. The first was on my first haikyo road trip back in 2007- back when I was packing only a cameraphone to shoot with and cared far more about the explore than I did about the photography. It was an amazing place to ‘discover’ for ourselves, our nerves on high wires the whole time as the ethereal music rang out from the rooftop. From the fore, in HDR. The volcano museum was much as we left it that first time. The front edge of the observation deck has been smashed away by time, volcanic eruptions, and weather. The observation building, with orange antenna room. One of my favorites in this set. Another favorite. 100 yen per use. After the observation deck I moved into the body of the museum, from the top down. Compare this shot to one from two years ago: That’s got to be volcano damage, as the windows and frames are buckled inwards. A side store-room, this fella was high up on a shelf. Off. On. Smashed displays alongside uncanny lights. 1.

Clocks Metric (or Decimalized) Time The day is divided into 100 parts (centidays), plus decimal fraction. Think of it as a percent of the day. The "Universal Metric Time" is based on the International Date Line. Hexadecimal Time The day is divided up into 65536 parts and written in hexadecimal (base-16) notation (A=10, B=11 ... Much more information about this can be found at Intuitor Hexadecimal Headquarters. Octal Time Octal Time uses a base-8 system (digits 0-7). Base64 Time Base-64 uses ASCII characters (in ascending order: A-Z, a-z, 0-1, +, and /). Binary Time Like hexadecimal time, the day is divided into 65536 parts, only we display it as a binary number using squares for bits, here using dark squares to represent 1 and white for 0. This can be viewed as a variation of hexadecimal time by dividing it into four 2x2 blocks of squares, each block corresponds to a digit of hexadecimal time. Mayan Time

Light & The Eye • scotopic or dim light adapted rods (denoted by V' and containing the photopigment rhodopsin), most sensitive to "green" wavelengths at around 505 nm • short wavelength or S cones, containing cyanolabe and most sensitive to "blue violet" wavelengths at around 445 nm. • medium wavelength or M cones, containing chlorolabe and most sensitive to "green" wavelengths at around 540 nm • long wavelength or L cones, containing the photopigment erythrolabe and most sensitive to "greenish yellow" wavelengths at around 565 nm As the figure shows, there is a large number of differences between rhodopsin (taken as baseline) and the S photopigment, and a similarly large number of differences between the S and M photopigments. Photopigments do not catch light particles the way a bucket catches rain. Measuring Photoreceptor Light Sensitivity. Four kinds of spectra were obtained with four distinct absorptance peaks at 420, 495, 530 and 560 nm. Five Views of the Cone Fundamentals. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Color Wheels are wrong? How color vision actually works. Color theory is a little obsession of mine. You’re here for startup advice, but this week I’m taking an indulgence. Leave a comment if you want to see more or fewer of these little distractions. Why are artists special? Ask any artist to explain how color works, and they’ll launch into a treatise about how the Three Primary Colors: red, blue, and yellow form a color “wheel:” Why “wheel?” Continuing this process produces the infamous color wheel you probably learned in school; a pretty, symmetrical, satisfying device in which each hue melds seamlessly and linearly into the next: Unfortunately, none of this stands up to even minor scrutiny. For example, open up your desktop printer and you’ll see something quite different: Three colors of ink which, when combined, produce all others: cyan, magenta, and yellow. But wait! Also it’s not as simple as saying “any three colors can produce all the others” because that’s clearly not true (by experiment). TVs and computers are different yet again.

Geometry of the Universe Can the Universe be finite in size? If so, what is ``outside'' the Universe? The answer to both these questions involves a discussion of the intrinsic geometry of the Universe. At this point it is important to remember the distinction between the curvature of space (negative, positive or flat) and the toplogy of the Universe (what is its shape = how is it connected). There are basically three possible shapes to the Universe; a flat Universe (Euclidean or zero curvature), a spherical or closed Universe (positive curvature) or a hyperbolic or open Universe (negative curvature). All three geometries are classes of what is called Riemannian geometry, based on three possible states for parallel lines always divergent (hyperbolic) or one can think of triangles where for a flat Universe the angles of a triangle sum to 180 degrees, in a closed Universe the sum must be greater than 180, in an open Universe the sum must be less than 180.

Watch the synchronisation of 32 metronomes (with an explanation behind it) - The Feed Blog (CBS News) A little over a year ago I posted a video on The Feed that showed a physics principle on display in the form of five metronomes that synched to each other with time and the right conditions. And it was very cool to watch we all learned something from it. So how about a quick refresher course, this time with 32 metronomes. Watch physics unfold in the video above. The science-in-action clip was posted by YouTube user IkeguchiLab , and for the explanation behind it, we refer back to the poster of the prior video, abahraminasab , who writes: Here you go: metronomes (or "pendula") when on table, oscillate with random phases, since that is how they started and they are "uncoupled" (no energy/information flows from one to other so they do not "know" each other.) So while not as obvious as in the prior video, it seems the table the 32 metronomes are on allows for enough movement to let this process take effect and lead to them synching with one another.

Search for element 113 concluded at last ScienceDaily (Sep. 26, 2012) — The most unambiguous data to date on the elusive 113th atomic element has been obtained by researchers at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science (RNC). A chain of six consecutive alpha decays, produced in experiments at the RIKEN Radioisotope Beam Factory (RIBF), conclusively identifies the element through connections to well-known daughter nuclides. The search for superheavy elements is a difficult and painstaking process. With their latest findings, associate chief scientist Kosuke Morita and his team at the RNC are set follow in these footsteps and make Japan the first country in Asia to name an atomic element. While the team also detected element 113 in experiments conducted in 2004 and 2005, earlier results identified only four decay events followed by the spontaneous fission of dubnium-262 (element 105). The above story is reprinted from materials provided by , via AlphaGalileo.

Physics Downloads Download Physics Notebooks UC Physics Lecture Demo PDF files: Click on the links below to download the files. The following PDF file is the entire Physics Lecture Demo Catalog: UC Physics Lecture Demos Index UC Physics Lecture Demo Catalog (30 MB PDF file) The following PDF files are individual chapters from the UC Physics Lecture Demo Catalog: (for people with slower connections, or who just want an individual category of demonstrations.) Note: In each PDF file there are links between the index and the individual demo illustrations. Back to Physics Demonstrations' Home Page 1242a - VISTA gigapixel mosaic of the central parts of the Milky Way This striking view of the central parts of the Milky Way was obtained with the VISTA survey telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. This huge picture is 108 200 by 81 500 pixels and contains nearly nine billion pixels. It was created by combining thousands of individual images from VISTA, taken through three different infrared filters, into a single monumental mosaic. These data form part of the VVV public survey and have been used to study a much larger number of individual stars in the central parts of the Milky Way than ever before. This image is too large to be easily displayed at full resolution and is best appreciated using the zoom tool. Credit: ESO/VVV Survey/D.

Stunning images of snowflakes under a (frozen) microscope [20 pictures] Researchers at Beltsville Agricultural Research Center have gathered samples of snow from around the country and are studying them under a microscope. To keep the flakes in their original shape, they’re viewed on a surface that has been chilled to -170 Celsius, or -224 Fahrenheit. (The microscope they use is understatedly labeled “low-temperature.”) Here are some of the amazing images coming from their research… On an interesting side note, man-made snow doesn’t vary in shape like natural snow does, and, in fact, doesn’t even look like natural snow at all when magnified. (via The Daily Mail)

10 Enormous Numbers Technology One of the first questions that kids often ask is “What is the biggest number?” This question is an important step in transitioning to a world of abstract concepts. Ten to the eightieth power – a 1 with 80 zeros after it – is quite massive but somewhat tangible at least from a relatively concrete point of view. The word googol, with a slightly different spelling, has become a frequently used verb in modern times, thanks to a highly popular search engine. Mental Calculator Alexis Lemaire set a world record for calculating the 13th root of a 100 digit number, the 13th root of 8,192 is 2, or 2 times itself thirteen times, 100 digit numbers are googols, one of the numbers that Lemaire had calculated would have read (3 googol, 893 Duotrigintillion, ext, ext.) A Plank length is extremely small, approximately 1.616199 x 10-35 meters, or in long form 0.00000000000000000000000000000616199 meters. Poincare Recurrence Time Sorry, had to do it.

BELT DRIVE TURNTABLE Philips Thorens Verdier Melco Micro Mercure NOTES DIY Mr. Yamamura and the Melco Turntables A few years earlier, in 1981, I stumbled upon the Melco turntables which were for the first time on display in Paris. I had an interesting conversation with Mr. Yamamura. With his firm Belco in London he imported these heavy turntables which boasted of platters weighing which boasted of platters weighing up to 35 kg. Platter Damping and Constant Speed In the process Alexander and I had experienced all sorts of construction problems that needed specific solutions: damping, decoupling, mechanical and acoustical feedback, constant speed, etc.

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