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Apophenia

Apophenia
Apophenia /æpɵˈfiːniə/ is the experience of perceiving patterns or connections in random or meaningless data. The term is attributed to Klaus Conrad[1] by Peter Brugger,[2] who defined it as the "unmotivated seeing of connections" accompanied by a "specific experience of an abnormal meaningfulness", but it has come to represent the human tendency to seek patterns in random information in general, such as with gambling and paranormal phenomena.[3] Meanings and forms[edit] In 2008, Michael Shermer coined the word "patternicity", defining it as "the tendency to find meaningful patterns in meaningless noise".[6][7] In The Believing Brain (2011), Shermer says that we have "the tendency to infuse patterns with meaning, intention, and agency", which Shermer calls "agenticity".[8] Statistics[edit] Pareidolia[edit] Pareidolia is a type of apophenia involving the perception of images or sounds in random stimuli, for example, hearing a ringing phone while taking a shower. Gambling[edit] Examples[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apophenia

Related:  Psychology

Synchronicity (The Police album) In 2009, Synchronicity was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In the 1983 Rolling Stone readers poll, Synchronicity was voted "Album of the Year". The album marked a significant reduction in the reggae influences that were a part of the band's first four records, instead featuring production-heavy textures and liberal use of synthesizers that, at times, drove entire songs ("Synchronicity I", "Wrapped Around Your Finger"). The influence of world music can also be heard in songs such as "Tea in the Sahara" and "Walking in Your Footsteps". The album was published in the UK and U.S. on both LP and CD in 1983, and on Super Audio CD in 2003. In 1989, it was published by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab as a remastered gold CD.

How Science Turned a Struggling Pro Skier Into an Olympic Medal Contender - Wired Science Saslong.org/R.Perathoner Steven Nyman is poised at the starting gate, alert, coiled, ready. A signal sounds: three even tones followed by a single, more urgent pitch, sending Nyman kicking onto the Val Gardena downhill ski course. He pushes five times with his poles, accelerating as quickly as possible, stabbing the snow frantically. He skates forward with abbreviated strokes, neon green boots moving up and down, his focus on building as much momentum as possible. Nyman is feeling good.

What’s so Great about Continued Fractions? - Scientific American Blog Network The more I learn about continued fractions, the more enamored I am with them. Last week, when I wrote about how much better continued fractions are than the arbitrary decimal digits we usually use to describe numbers, I mentioned that continued fractions tell us the “best approximations” of irrational numbers. Continued fractions are just fractions made of fractions. Every number, rational or irrational, can be written as a continued fraction. In order to get a systematic way to write them, for now we’re going to concentrate on continued fractions that only have ones in the numerators and positive integers in the denominators, although there are some very lovely continued fractions that do not have this property.

Eugen Bleuler Paul Eugen Bleuler (;[1] German: [ˈɔɪɡeːn ˈblɔɪlər]; 30 April 1857 – 15 July 1939)[2] was a Swiss psychiatrist and eugenicist[3] most notable for his contributions to the understanding of mental illness. He coined many psychiatric terms, such as "schizophrenia",[4][5] "schizoid",[6] "autism",[7] depth psychology and what Sigmund Freud called "Bleuler's happily chosen term ambivalence".[8] Personal life[edit]

The bacteria that turns water into ice Meet Pseudomonas syringae, a bacterium that causes disease in plants and helps make snow machines work. It all has to do with ice nucleation — the process that forms ice crystals in the atmosphere and, thus, snow. You probably know that raindrops and snowflakes form around something. There's always a central nucleus that serves as the backbone of the water molecule structure. Usually, when people talk about this process, they use soot or some other kind of particulate matter as the example of what a nucleus can be. But bacteria can also become the nucleus of a snowflake.

All the Terms Of Hacking World You Should Know Today we will discuss most common terms used in the hacker community. These definitions are a must to a wanna be ethical hacker and helps a lot for a programming enthusiast. 1#DDoS: DDoS means Distributed Denial of Service. This is a type of DOS attack in which multiple compromised systems are used and these systems are often infected with a Trojan. All these infected systems select a target and cause a Denial of Service (DoS) attack. 2# VPS: It stands for Virtual private server (VPS) .

exulansis “Creates beautiful new words that we need but do not yet have.” — John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows is a compendium of invented words written by John Koenig. Is the Universe a Simulation? Photo Gray Matter By EDWARD FRENKEL IN Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel “The Master and Margarita,” the protagonist, a writer, burns a manuscript in a moment of despair, only to find out later from the Devil that “manuscripts don’t burn.” While you might appreciate this romantic sentiment, there is of course no reason to think that it is true. Nikolai Gogol apparently burned the second volume of “Dead Souls,” and it has been lost forever.

The world in 2076: Goodbye electricity, hello superconductivity Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo / Alamy Stock Photo By Michael Brooks Thirty years is a long time to wait for the next big thing. But for half of New Scientist‘s lifetime, a select group of researchers has been sure that a world-changing discovery is just around the corner. Liminality In anthropology, liminality (from the Latin word līmen, meaning "a threshold"[1]) is the quality of ambiguity or disorientation that occurs in the middle stage of rituals, when participants no longer hold their pre-ritual status but have not yet begun the transition to the status they will hold when the ritual is complete. During a ritual's liminal stage, participants "stand at the threshold" between their previous way of structuring their identity, time, or community, and a new way, which the ritual establishes. Rites of passage[edit] Arnold van Gennep[edit]

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