background preloader

Low IQ & Conservative Beliefs Linked to Prejudice

Low IQ & Conservative Beliefs Linked to Prejudice
There's no gentle way to put it: People who give in to racism and prejudice may simply be dumb, according to a new study that is bound to stir public controversy. The research finds that children with low intelligence are more likely to hold prejudiced attitudes as adults. These findings point to a vicious cycle, according to lead researcher Gordon Hodson, a psychologist at Brock University in Ontario. Low-intelligence adults tend to gravitate toward socially conservative ideologies, the study found. Those ideologies, in turn, stress hierarchy and resistance to change, attitudes that can contribute to prejudice, Hodson wrote in an email to LiveScience. "Prejudice is extremely complex and multifaceted, making it critical that any factors contributing to bias are uncovered and understood," he said. Controversy ahead The findings combine three hot-button topics. Brains and bias As suspected, low intelligence in childhood corresponded with racism in adulthood. A study of averages

http://www.livescience.com/18132-intelligence-social-conservatism-racism.html

Related:  Cognitive Distortions - The Fragility of Human ThinkingG Factor

Meditation makes people more rational decision-makers - Science Fair: Science and Space News Updated 2011-04-20 12:23 PM Meditation, the ancient practice of mindfulness employed by all major religions, can actually reprogram the brain to be more rational and less emotional, researchers in Canada and the United States say. The researchers looked at a classic psychological test called the Ultimatum Game. In this test, researchers propose this scenario: A friend or relative has won some sum of money and then offers the test subject a small portion of it - will they accept the money? Surprisingly, despite the fact that it's a windfall, multiple tests over 30 years show that only about a quarter of people say yes.

Average IQ in US and 80 other nations The average IQ in the United States is usually set at 100. Groups within the US score different average IQ's, such as 115 for college grads or 85 for African-Americans. Similarly, average IQ varies from country to country, shown in the 2002 book IQ and the Wealth of Nations (sets Britain at 100): The top 5 nations above were also the top scorers (different order) in 8th grade math and science in 2003.

What Is Extreme Democracy? "Extreme democracy" is a political philosophy of the information era that puts people in charge of the entire political process. It suggests a deliberative process that places total confidence in the people, opening the policy-making process to many centers of power through deeply networked coalitions that can be organized around local, national and international issues. The choice of the word "extreme" reflects the lessons of the extreme programming movement in technology that has allowed small teams to make rapid progress on complex projects through concentrated projects that yield results far greater than previous labor-intensive programming practices. Extreme democracy is not direct democracy, which assumes all people must be involved in every decision in order for the process to be just and democratic.

Column: Doing the math on Obama’s deficits (Graph: Todd Lindeman/Ezra Klein; data: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities) The campaign trail can be a lonely place, so Mitt Romney frequently invites friends to accompany him. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is an occasional companion. So is Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. But more often, Romney brings a large clock.

On the evolutionary origins of the egalitarian syndrome Sergey Gavrilets1 Author Affiliations Edited by Peter J. Richerson, University of California, Davis, CA, and accepted by the Editorial Board July 2, 2012 (received for review January 30, 2012) Why Do People Persist in Believing Things That Just Aren't True? Last month, Brendan Nyhan, a professor of political science at Dartmouth, published the results of a study that he and a team of pediatricians and political scientists had been working on for three years. They had followed a group of almost two thousand parents, all of whom had at least one child under the age of seventeen, to test a simple relationship: Could various pro-vaccination campaigns change parental attitudes toward vaccines? Each household received one of four messages: a leaflet from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stating that there had been no evidence linking the measles, mumps, and rubella (M.M.R.) vaccine and autism; a leaflet from the Vaccine Information Statement on the dangers of the diseases that the M.M.R. vaccine prevents; photographs of children who had suffered from the diseases; and a dramatic story from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about an infant who almost died of measles. The result was dramatic: a whole lot of nothing.

Brain Images Reveal the Secret to Higher IQ New research suggests that the layer of insulation coating neural wiring in the brain plays a critical role in determining intelligence. In addition, the quality of this insulation appears to be largely genetically determined, providing further support for the idea that IQ is partly inherited. The findings, which result from a detailed study of twins’ brains, hint at how ever-improving brain-imaging technology could shed light on some of our most basic characteristics. Localism: An Alternative to Globalisation 28 March, 2012 Sustainable Economy: Keeping Wealth (Wellbeing) In Our Families And Communities By Bryan Innes Before industrialisation, economy mainly referred to local economy and household economy, based on cooperative and competitive processes.

Jeff Masters: the Climate Has Shifted to a New State Jeff Masters, one of the nation's leading meteorologists and creator of the popular weather site Weather Underground thinks something fundamental has changed: Obviously, strong tropical disturbances capable of developing into named storms are very rare in February, and I've never seen one in my 30 years as a meteorologist. However, ocean temperatures are warm enough year-round to support a tropical storm in the waters of the Western Caribbean. Water temperatures today in the region were 26 - 26.5°C (79 - 80°F), which is near average for this time of year. If an unusual configuration of the jet stream allows wind shear to drop below about 25 knots in the Western Caribbean, there is the opportunity for a rare off-season tropical storm to form in February. We all have experienced it, but this is expert confirmation of that experience.

Related: