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Classical conditioning

Classical conditioning
Classical conditioning (also Pavlovian or respondent conditioning) is a process of behavior modification in which an innate response to a potent biological stimulus becomes expressed in response to a previously neutral stimulus; this is achieved by repeated pairings of the neutral stimulus and the potent biological stimulus that elicits the desired response. Classical conditioning was made famous by Ivan Pavlov and his experiments conducted with dogs. Classical conditioning became the basis for a theory of how organisms learn, and a philosophy of psychology developed by John B. Watson, B. F. Skinner and others. Basic Definition[edit] Classical conditioning occurs when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus. In classical conditioning, the conditioned stimulus is not simply connected to the unconditioned response. Procedures[edit] Diagram representing forward conditioning. Forward conditioning[edit] Learning is fastest in forward conditioning. Extinction[edit] Test

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