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Useful Websites Here is a list of websites we have featured in the past that might come in handy. Remember to set FuckingHomepage.com as your start page if you haven’t already. Educational/Learning favoriteandforget.com – Useful and educational links updated daily. Learn Skills highercomputingforeveryone.com - learn to program in Cthechesswebsite.com - a bunch of chess tactics, tutorials, and puzzleshtmldog.com - learn htmlcodecademy.com - learn to code through interactive lessonscookingforengineers.com - learn to cookdigital-photography-school.com - learn photographymemrise.com - learn a foreign languagejustinguitar.com - guitar video tutorialslivemocha.com - a language learning communitymusictheory.net - learn music theoryinvestopedia.com - learn and practice investing Useful Web Apps Entertainment - Music, Movies, Sports, Books Other Interesting Blogs

Why Intelligent People Drink More Alcohol Drinking alcohol is evolutionarily novel, so the Hypothesis would predict that more intelligent people drink more alcohol than less intelligent people. The human consumption of alcohol probably originates from frugivory (consumption of fruits). Fermentation of sugars by yeast naturally present in overripe and decaying fruits produces ethanol, known to intoxicate birds and mammals. However, the amount of ethanol alcohol in such fruits ranges from trace to 5%, roughly comparable to light beer. (And you can't really get drunk on light beer.) Human consumption of alcohol, however, was unintentional, accidental, and haphazard until about 10,000 years ago. Human experience with concentrations of ethanol higher than 5% that is attained by decaying fruits is therefore very recent. The following graph shows the association between childhood intelligence and the latent factor for the quantity of adult alcohol consumption decades later among the British NCDS respondents.

Pavlov’s Dogs by Saul McLeod published 2007, updated 2013 Like many great scientific advances, Pavlovian conditioning (aka classical conditioning) was discovered accidentally. During the 1890s Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov was looking at salivation in dogs in response to being fed, when he noticed that his dogs would begin to salivate whenever he entered the room, even when he was not bringing them food. At first this was something of a nuisance (not to mention messy!). Pavlovian Conditioning Pavlov (1902) started from the idea that there are some things that a dog does not need to learn. Unconditioned Stimulus (Food) > Unconditioned Response (Salivate) Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and the measuring its salivary secretions (see image below). Pavlov knew that somehow, the dogs in his lab had learned to associate food with his lab assistant. In behaviorist terms, the lab assistant was originally a neutral stimulus. Summary References

Michael Lewis on the King of Human Error We’re obviously all at the mercy of forces we only dimly perceive and events over which we have no control, but it’s still unsettling to discover that there are people out there—human beings of whose existence you are totally oblivious—who have effectively toyed with your life. I had that feeling soon after I published Moneyball. The book was ostensibly about a cash-strapped major-league baseball team, the Oakland A’s, whose general manager, Billy Beane, had realized that baseball players were sometimes misunderstood by baseball professionals, and found new and better ways to value them. Lewis is actually speaking here of a central finding in cognitive psychology. Kahneman and Tversky were psychologists, without a single minor-league plate appearance between them, but they had found that people, including experts, unwittingly use all sorts of irrelevant criteria in decision-making. Which alternative is more probable? (1) Linda is a bank teller.

Memory Gym Series | :: BrainTrain - Changing the Way People Think :: Insurance coverage varies according to insurance company and state, but all major carriers now cover Cognitive Rehabilitation. It is billed in 15 minute units with fees paid at $35 to $55 per unit, depending on the region of the country. A treatment plan is required and progress must be documented. In addition, the patient needs to be qualified to show that he or she can possibly benefit from this form of treatment. Currently, neurological disorders, strokes, cancer treatment (medicines used to treat cancer are toxic to the brain) and traumatic brain injuries are covered. Alzheimer's is usually not covered. Code: 97532: Development of cognitive skills to improve attention, memory, problem solving (includes compensatory training), direct patient contact by the provider, each 15 minutes. Code: 97533: Sensory integrative techniques to enhance sensory processing and promote adaptive responses to environment demands, direct patient contact by the provider, each 15 minutes.

Seven tricks your brain is playing on you (NaturalNews) We all want to believe we are tough to fool. The problem is, even if you are not so gullible, your brain still works a certain way, making associations that create vulnerability to being easily fooled, or fooling yourself. It takes work to release yourself from these natural assumptions that are presumed to originate from a mix of hard wiring and cultural conditioning. Getting beyond them is surely a worthwhile thing to do, however. Here are seven common assumptions that a lot of brains simply can't resist. 1. Did you know that people who use the word because when making a request dramatically increase their chances of getting the favor? Social psychologist Ellen Langer performed an experiment in which she asked to cut in line to use a copy machine. Excuse me, I have five pages. Excuse me, I have five pages. Using because I'm in a rush yielded a huge approval boost. Excuse me, I have five pages. Using the word because is more important than the ensuing reason. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Body language, not facial expressions, broadcasts what's happening to us If you think that you can judge by examining someone's facial expressions if he has just hit the jackpot in the lottery or lost everything in the stock market -- think again. Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at New York University and Princeton University have discovered that -- despite what leading theoretical models and conventional wisdom might indicate -- it just doesn't work that way. Rather, they found that body language provides a better cue in trying to judge whether an observed subject has undergone strong positive or negative experiences. In a study published this week in the journal Science, the researchers present data showing that viewers in test groups were baffled when shown photographs of people who were undergoing real-life, highly intense positive and negative experiences. The study was led by Dr. In an additional study, Aviezer and his collaborators asked viewers to examine a more broad range of real-life intense faces.

THE WORLD QUESTION CENTER 2011— Page 1 GEORGE LAKOFF Cognitive Scientist and Linguist; Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics, UC Berkeley; Author, The Political Mind Conceptual Metaphor Conceptual Metaphor is at the center of a complex theory of how the brain gives rise to thought and language, and how cognition is embodied. All concepts are physical brain circuits deriving their meaning via neural cascades that terminate in linkage to the body. That is how embodied cognition arises. Primary metaphors are brain mappings linking disparate brain regions, each tied to the body in a different way. Complex conceptual metaphors arise via neural bindings, both across metaphors and from a given metaphor to a conceptual frame circuit. Because conceptual metaphors unconsciously structure the brain's conceptual system, much of normal everyday thought is metaphoric, with different conceptual metaphors used to think with on different occasions or by different people. The science is clear.

4 secrets to reading body language like an expert: How important is body language? 55% of what you convey when you speak comes from body language. In fact, when you’re speaking about something emotional only about 7% of what the other person hears has to do with the words you use. More often than not you can tell what a politician thinks about an issue just by watching their hands. In five minutes you can often evaluate people with approximately 70% accuracy… but obviously we’re wrong often, and that 30% can be very costly. What can the research teach us about better reading people’s body language? What You’re Doing Wrong In The Silent Language of Leaders: How Body Language Can Help–or Hurt–How You Lead the author points out a number of common errors people make. Here’s how I interpreted the findings: Ignoring context: Crossed arms don’t mean as much if the room is cold or the chair they’re sitting in doesn’t have armrests. What To Focus On What signals can and should you trust when trying to get a “read” on someone? Specifics To Look For Tags:

List of cognitive biases Cognitive biases are systematic patterns of deviation from norm or rationality in judgment, and are often studied in psychology and behavioral economics.[1] There are also controversies over some of these biases as to whether they count as useless or irrational, or whether they result in useful attitudes or behavior. For example, when getting to know others, people tend to ask leading questions which seem biased towards confirming their assumptions about the person. Although this research overwhelmingly involves human subjects, some findings that demonstrate bias have been found in non-human animals as well. Decision-making, belief, and behavioral biases[edit] Many of these biases affect belief formation, business and economic decisions, and human behavior in general. Social biases[edit] Most of these biases are labeled as attributional biases. Memory errors and biases[edit] See also[edit] [edit] ^ Haselton, M. References[edit] Baron, Jonathan (1994).

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