background preloader

All Posts

All Posts
Related:  Cognitive Biases

Authorama - Public Domain Books Procrastination The Misconception: You procrastinate because you are lazy and can’t manage your time well. The Truth: Procrastination is fueled by weakness in the face of impulse and a failure to think about thinking. Netflix reveals something about your own behavior you should have noticed by now, something which keeps getting between you and the things you want to accomplish. If you have Netflix, especially if you stream it to your TV, you tend to gradually accumulate a cache of hundreds of films you think you’ll watch one day. Take a look at your queue. Psychologists actually know the answer to this question, to why you keep adding movies you will never watch to your growing collection of future rentals, and it is the same reason you believe you will eventually do what’s best for yourself in all the other parts of your life, but rarely do. A study conducted in 1999 by Read, Loewenstein and Kalyanaraman had people pick three movies out of a selection of 24. You weigh yourself. How would you pick? Links:

Bootcamp App Exercise Descriptions & Couch to 5K Having trouble remembering the exercises? Don’t worry, with time you’ll know them all by heart, especially if you’re working out regularly. Here is a break down of Bootcamp’s exercises in each of the four categories. The in app exercise picture along with the description are listed below. As always, have fun and enjoy your workouts. My 5 and 2 year old LOVE when we workout together with this app. Download the app now to your iPhone and iPod Touch to get your heart pumping and body moving! Visit www.bootcampapp.com for more app details. Like us on Facebook! Please feel free to contact me with any of your questions or suggestions support@runhelper.com Like this: Like Loading...

The Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy The Misconception: You take randomness into account when determining cause and effect. The Truth: You tend to ignore random chance when the results seem meaningful or when you want a random event to have a meaningful cause. Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy were both presidents of the United States, elected 100 years apart. Both were shot and killed by assassins who were known by three names with 15 letters, John Wilkes Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald, and neither killer would make it to trial. Spooky, huh? Lincoln had a secretary named Kennedy, and Kennedy had a secretary named Lincoln. They were both killed on a Friday while sitting next to their wives, Lincoln in the Ford Theater, Kennedy in a Lincoln made by Ford. Both men were succeeded by a man named Johnson – Andrew for Lincoln and Lyndon for Kennedy. What are the odds? In 1898, Morgan Robertson wrote a novel titled “Futility.” The novel describes a giant boat called the Titan which everyone considers unsinkable. Wow. Hold on a second.

Why Intelligent People Drink More Alcohol Drinking alcohol is evolutionarily novel, so the Hypothesis would predict that more intelligent people drink more alcohol than less intelligent people. The human consumption of alcohol probably originates from frugivory (consumption of fruits). Fermentation of sugars by yeast naturally present in overripe and decaying fruits produces ethanol, known to intoxicate birds and mammals. However, the amount of ethanol alcohol in such fruits ranges from trace to 5%, roughly comparable to light beer. (And you can't really get drunk on light beer.) Human consumption of alcohol, however, was unintentional, accidental, and haphazard until about 10,000 years ago. Human experience with concentrations of ethanol higher than 5% that is attained by decaying fruits is therefore very recent. The following graph shows the association between childhood intelligence and the latent factor for the quantity of adult alcohol consumption decades later among the British NCDS respondents.

Absolute Shakespeare - plays, quotes, summaries, essays... 10 Psychological Experiments That Went Horribly Wrong Psychology as we know it is a relatively young science, but since its inception it has helped us to gain a greater understanding of ourselves and our interactions with the world. Many psychological experiments have been valid and ethical, allowing researchers to make new treatments and therapies available, and giving other insights into our motivations and actions. Sadly, others have ended up backfiring horribly — ruining lives and shaming the profession. 10. Prisoners and guards In 1971, social psychologist Philip Zimbardo set out to interrogate the ways in which people conform to social roles, using a group of male college students to take part in a two-week-long experiment in which they would live as prisoners and guards in a mock prison. 9. Wendell Johnson, of the University of Iowa, who was behind the study Theodore Kaczynski, the Unabomber, also seen top 7. 6. The Milgram Experiment underway 5. 4. A rhesus monkey infant in one of Harlow's isolation chambers 3. 2. 1. David Reimer

www.wtamu.edu/academic/anns/mps/math/mathlab/col_algebra/col_alg_tut43_logfun.htm Again we are going in the opposite direction we were going in examples 1 and 2. But as mentioned above, you can use the log definition in either direction. These examples are to get you use to that definition: if and only if Rewriting the original problem using exponents we get: First, let's figure out what the base needs to be. Next, let's figure out the exponent. The value that the exponential expression is set equal to is what goes inside the log function. Let's see what we get when we put this in log form:

How we (should) decide Caspar Hare is interested in your choices. Not the ones you’ve already made, but the ones you will make, and how you’ll go about making them. The more important, the better. By way of example, suppose you’re deciding between two careers: journalism and physics. You enjoy both, but for different reasons: Journalism lets you interact with a broad swath of society, exercise your passion for writing and reach a wider audience; physics, though, represents the allure of science, with the freedom to chart a research trajectory at the forefront of human knowledge. Suppose, too, for argument’s sake, that you had a pretty good idea of how each career would turn out. In your mind, the two options — call them J and P — are so equally and oppositely attractive that you truly cannot decide. If you’re like most people, the answer is “not really.” Incommensurate values To understand negative intransitivity, first recall the transitive property: If you prefer A to B and B to C, then you prefer A to C.

Michael Lewis on the King of Human Error We’re obviously all at the mercy of forces we only dimly perceive and events over which we have no control, but it’s still unsettling to discover that there are people out there—human beings of whose existence you are totally oblivious—who have effectively toyed with your life. I had that feeling soon after I published Moneyball. The book was ostensibly about a cash-strapped major-league baseball team, the Oakland A’s, whose general manager, Billy Beane, had realized that baseball players were sometimes misunderstood by baseball professionals, and found new and better ways to value them. Lewis is actually speaking here of a central finding in cognitive psychology. Kahneman and Tversky were psychologists, without a single minor-league plate appearance between them, but they had found that people, including experts, unwittingly use all sorts of irrelevant criteria in decision-making. Which alternative is more probable? (1) Linda is a bank teller.

Related:  interesting facts2For FunTo ReadStudy Me SmartUseful InfoLife and so onAll otherspsychology and stuff