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Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed — How to Foolproof Your Mind, Part II

Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed — How to Foolproof Your Mind, Part II
In the first part of this article, we focused on 5 traps that hinder our ability to think rationally. As a quick recap, we discussed: The Anchoring Trap: Over-Relying on First ThoughtsThe Status Quo Trap: Keeping on Keeping OnThe Sunk Cost Trap: Protecting Earlier ChoicesThe Confirmation Trap: Seeing What You Want to SeeThe Incomplete Information Trap: Review Your Assumptions Now it’s time to complete the list and expose the remaining 5 dangerous traps to be avoided. Let’s dive right in. 6. In a series of experiments, researchers asked students in a classroom a series of very simple questions and, sure enough, most of them got the answers right. This “herd instinct” exists — to different degrees — in all of us. This tendency to conform is notoriously exploited in advertising. Conformity is also one of the main reasons why once a book makes into a well-known best-sellers list, it tends to “lock in” and continue there for a long time. What can you do about it? 7. 8. John Riley is a legend. Related:  Cognitive Bias

Top 10 Thinking Traps Exposed Our minds set up many traps for us. Unless we’re aware of them, these traps can seriously hinder our ability to think rationally, leading us to bad reasoning and making stupid decisions. Features of our minds that are meant to help us may, eventually, get us into trouble. Here are the first 5 of the most harmful of these traps and how to avoid each one of them. 1. “Is the population of Turkey greater than 35 million? Lesson: Your starting point can heavily bias your thinking: initial impressions, ideas, estimates or data “anchor” subsequent thoughts. This trap is particularly dangerous as it’s deliberately used in many occasions, such as by experienced salesmen, who will show you a higher-priced item first, “anchoring” that price in your mind, for example. What can you do about it? Always view a problem from different perspectives. 2. In one experiment a group of people were randomly given one of two gifts — half received a decorated mug, the other half a large Swiss chocolate bar. 3. 4.

TypeLogic Home Page Healthy Thinking Skills Research shows that how or what we think directly affects our moods and how we feel. Contrary to popular belief, events or situations do not determine your mood. Instead, how you think about the event or situation typically determines mood. Men are not worried by things, but by their ideas about things. -Epictetus, about 60 AD It is very obvious that we are not influenced by "facts" but by our interpretation of the facts. -Alfred Adler If thinking affects our feelings, we can change how we feel by changing how we think. Change your negative thinking to positive thinking and thereby change your negative moods to positive moods. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Don’t get stuck. Suggested exercise: Rank the styles that apply to you and the next time that you experience a negative mood check and see if this distorted thinking pattern is in play. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. References *From Thoughts & Feelings by McKay, Davis, & Fanning. Resources: Learned Optimism, by Martin E.

10 More Common Faults in Human Thought | Listverse Humans This list is a follow up to Top 10 Common Faults in Human Thought. Thanks for everyone’s comments and feedback; you have inspired this second list! It is amazing that with all these biases, people are able to actually have a rational thought every now and then. The confirmation bias is the tendency to look for or interpret information in a way that confirms beliefs. The Availability heuristic is gauging what is more likely based on vivid memories. Illusion of Control is the tendency for individuals to believe they can control or at least influence outcomes that they clearly have no influence on. Interesting Fact: when playing craps in a casino, people will throw the dice hard when they need a high number and soft when they need a low number. The Planning fallacy is the tendency to underestimate the time needed to complete tasks. Interesting Fact: “Realistic pessimism” is a phenomenon where depressed or overly pessimistic people more accurately predict task completion estimations.

This Is A War - ABUSE a definition of verbal abuse - You understand their feelings, but they never attempt to understand yours; - They dismiss your difficulties or issues as unimportant or an overreaction; - They do not listen to you; - They always put their needs before yours; - They expect you to perform tasks that you find unpleasant or humiliating; - You "walk on eggshells" in an effort not to upset them; - They ignore logic and prefer amateur theatrics in order to remain the centre of attention; - Instead manipulate you into feeling guilty for things that have nothing to do with you; - They attempt to destroy any outside support you receive by belittling the people/ service/practice in an attempt to retain exclusive control over your emotions; - They never take responsibility for hurting others; - They blame everyone and everything else for any unfortunate events in their lives; - They perceive themselves as martyrs or victims and constantly expect preferential treatment. Copyright 2006 Abuse List. rejecting support

Critical Thinking On The Web Top Ten Argument Mapping Tutorials. Six online tutorials in argument mapping, a core requirement for advanced critical thinking.The Skeptic's Dictionary - over 400 definitions and essays. The Fallacy Files by Gary Curtis. Best website on fallacies. Butterflies and Wheels. What is critical thinking? Nobody said it better than Francis Bacon, back in 1605: For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things … and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to consider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. A shorter version is the art of being right. More definitions... Program for Critical Thinking 6 Dec 21 May

Top 10 Common Faults In Human Thought | Listverse Humans The human mind is a wonderful thing. Cognition, the act or process of thinking, enables us to process vast amounts of information quickly. For example, every time your eyes are open, you brain is constantly being bombarded with stimuli. You may be consciously thinking about one specific thing, but you brain is processing thousands of subconscious ideas. The Gambler’s fallacy is the tendency to think that future probabilities are altered by past events, when in reality, they are not. Reactivity is the tendency of people to act or appear differently when they know that they are being observed. Pareidolia is when random images or sounds are perceived as significant. Interesting Fact: the Rorschach Inkblot test was developed to use pareidolia to tap into people’s mental states. Self-fulfilling Prophecy Self-fulfilling prophecy is engaging in behaviors that obtain results that confirm existing attitudes. Interesting Fact: Economic Recessions are self-fulfilling prophecies.

Impatience Linked with Poor Credit Score By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on December 5, 2011 Want to improve your credit rating? A new study finds that people with bad credit scores are more impatient – more likely to choose immediate rewards rather than wait for a larger reward later. “Most often, the reasons economists put forward are, maybe there was not enough screening for mortgage applicants, or securitization, or other institutional reasons,” said Dr. “That’s definitely important, but in the end humans make those repayment decisions. The research will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. During tax season, Meier and Sprenger recruited 437 low-to-moderate income people at a community center in Boston that was offering tax preparation help. Each person was given a questionnaire in which they made choices between a smaller, immediate reward and a larger reward later. Money in hand photo by shutterstock.

47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself I’ve decided to start a series called 100 Things You Should Know about People. As in: 100 things you should know if you are going to design an effective and persuasive website, web application or software application. Or maybe just 100 things that everyone should know about humans! The order that I’ll present these 100 things is going to be pretty random. Dr. <div class="slide-intro-bottom"><a href=" How Mistakes Can Make You Smarter OK, nobody wants to make mistakes -- but how you react to them makes a big difference in whether you learn from them. Two new studies looked at what happens in people's brains as they make mistakes. One used college students performing a computer task; the other used doctors making decisions about which medications to prescribe. In both studies, participants received immediate feedback about whether they had made the right decision, and they were given opportunities to try again, using what they had learned. It turns out that there are two typical brain responses to mistakes. The second brain response looks more like a shutting down. The researchers think this is evidence of a confirmation bias - we want to feel good about ourselves, so we pay more attention to feedback that is consistent with our self-image . Each study found an interesting predictor of whose brains paid more attention, and whose brains shut down, in the face of a mistake: 1. 2. The lesson of these studies? 1. 2.

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