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Biofeedback

Biofeedback
Biofeedback is the process of gaining greater awareness of many physiological functions primarily using instruments that provide information on the activity of those same systems, with a goal of being able to manipulate them at will.[1][2] Some of the processes that can be controlled include brainwaves, muscle tone, skin conductance, heart rate and pain perception.[3] Biofeedback may be used to improve health, performance, and the physiological changes that often occur in conjunction with changes to thoughts, emotions, and behavior. Eventually, these changes may be maintained without the use of extra equipment, even though no equipment is necessarily required to practice biofeedback.[2] Biofeedback has been found to be effective for the treatment of headaches and migraines.[4][5] Definition[edit] Sensor modalities[edit] Electromyograph[edit] The "Muscle Whistler", shown here with surface EMG electrodes, was an early biofeedback device[6] Feedback thermometer[edit] Electrodermograph[edit] Related:  Development of Cognitive Behavioral theory

Tactile-Kinestheti Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners Making up about 5% of the population, tactile and kinesthetic learners absorb information best by doing, experiencing, touching, moving or being active in some way. Enjoy feeling, discovery and action Remember by using tools, building models and manipulating things Learn through emotions, touch, movement and space Enjoy demonstrations of concept demonstrations Master skills through imitation and practice. Create a model Demonstrate a principle Practice a technique Participate in simulations Engage in hands-on activities Study in comfortable position, not necessarily sitting in a chair PREFERRED TEST STYLES FOR TACTILE-KINESTHETIC LEARNERS Multiple choice, short definitions fill in the blanks WORST TEST TYPE Long essay tests POSSIBLE CAREER PATHS Dancers, physical education teachers, actors, firefighters, athletes, mimes

Albert Ellis Albert Ellis (September 27, 1913 – July 24, 2007) was an American psychologist who in 1955 developed Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). He held M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from Columbia University and American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP). He also founded and was the President of the New York City-based Albert Ellis Institute for decades.[1] He is generally considered to be one of the originators of the cognitive revolutionary paradigm shift in psychotherapy and the founder of cognitive-behavioral therapies. Based on a 1982 professional survey of USA and Canadian psychologists, he was considered as the second most influential psychotherapist in history (Carl Rogers ranked first in the survey; Sigmund Freud was ranked third).[2][3] Early life[edit] Ellis was born to a Jewish family in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, in 1913. In his autobiography, Ellis characterized his mother as a self-absorbed woman with a bipolar disorder. Ellis and religion[edit]

Hack Your Brain: Improving Memory with Dirty Pictures « How-To News If you're interested in nabbing superhero memory strength, the secret behind training your brain is not necessarily what you might expect. Your standard G-rated brain strengthening exercises range from crossword puzzles to sudoku to calculating fairly simple math problems to improve short term memory, but the real clincher used by some of the pros is essentially... porn. Yep, you read right. Operating on the idea that inappropriate or dirty images are easier to recall than the mundane, Ed Cooke, author and co-founder of Memrise, proposes you associate a raunchy image with what you're trying to remember, and voilà, information successfully locked away in the vault. According to an article in Salon, Cooke used his debaucherous technique to help Joshua Foer—author of "Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything"—to snag the U.S. Creativity is key. Photo by Helga Weber

Aaron T. Beck Background and personal life[edit] Beck was born in Providence, Rhode Island, USA, the youngest child of four siblings to Russian Jewish immigrants. Beck's daughter, Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is a prominent cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) educator and clinician, who wrote the basic text in the field. She is President of the non-profit Beck Institute.[11] Beck was married in 1950 to the Honorable Phyllis W. Education[edit] Beck attended Brown University, graduating magna cum laude in 1942.[14] At Brown he was elected a member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, was an associate editor of The Brown Daily Herald, and received the Francis Wayland Scholarship, William Gaston Prize for Excellence in Oratory, and Philo Sherman Bennett Essay Award.[13] Beck attended Yale Medical School, graduating with an M.D. in 1946. Honorary degrees[edit] Career[edit] Early work[edit] CBT, psychotherapy, and psychiatry[edit] Beck developed cognitive therapy in the early 1960s as a psychiatrist at Penn. Works[edit]

The Ten Most Revealing Psych Experiments Psychology is the study of the human mind and mental processes in relation to human behaviors - human nature. Due to its subject matter, psychology is not considered a 'hard' science, even though psychologists do experiment and publish their findings in respected journals. Some of the experiments psychologists have conducted over the years reveal things about the way we humans think and behave that we might not want to embrace, but which can at least help keep us humble. That's something. 1. The Robbers Cave Experiment is a classic social psychology experiment conducted with two groups of 11-year old boys at a state park in Oklahoma, and demonstrates just how easily an exclusive group identity is adopted and how quickly the group can degenerate into prejudice and antagonism toward outsiders. Researcher Muzafer Sherif actually conducted a series of 3 experiments. 2. The prisoners rebelled on the second day, and the reaction of the guards was swift and brutal. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Cognitive therapy Cognitive therapy (CT) is a type of psychotherapy developed by American psychiatrist Aaron T. Beck. CT is one of the therapeutic approaches within the larger group of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) and was first expounded by Beck in the 1960s. Cognitive therapy is based on the cognitive model, which states that thoughts, feelings and behavior are all connected, and that individuals can move toward overcoming difficulties and meeting their goals by identifying and changing unhelpful or inaccurate thinking, problematic behavior, and distressing emotional responses. As an example of how CT works might work: Having made a mistake at work, a man may believe, "I'm useless and can't do anything right at work." People who are working with a cognitive therapist often practice the use of more flexible ways to think and respond, learning to ask themselves whether their thoughts are completely true, and whether those thoughts are helping them to meet their goals. History[edit] Types[edit]

02.22.2010 - An afternoon nap markedly boosts the brain’s learning capacity If you see a student dozing in the library or a co-worker catching 40 winks in her cubicle, don’t roll your eyes. New research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows that an hour’s nap can dramatically boost and restore your brain power. Indeed, the findings suggest that a biphasic sleep schedule not only refreshes the mind, but can make you smarter. Students who napped (green column) did markedly better in memorizing tests than their no-nap counterparts. (Courtesy of Matthew Walker) Conversely, the more hours we spend awake, the more sluggish our minds become, according to the findings. “Sleep not only rights the wrong of prolonged wakefulness but, at a neurocognitive level, it moves you beyond where you were before you took a nap,” said Matthew Walker, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and the lead investigator of these studies. In the recent UC Berkeley sleep study, 39 healthy young adults were divided into two groups — nap and no-nap.

Edward C. Tolman Edward Chace Tolman (April 14, 1886 – November 19, 1959) was an American psychologist. He was most famous for his studies on behavioral psychology. Background[edit] Born in West Newton, Massachusetts, brother of CalTech physicist Richard Chace Tolman, Edward C. Tolman studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1915. Psychological work[edit] Tolman is best known for his studies of learning in rats using mazes, and he published many experimental articles, of which his paper with Ritchie and Kalish in 1946 was probably the most influential. Although Tolman was firmly behaviorist in his methodology, he was not a radical behaviorist like B. A key paper by Tolman, Ritchie and Kalish in 1946 demonstrated that rats that had explored a maze that contained food while they were not hungry were able to run it correctly on the first trial when they entered it having now been made hungry. Tolman won many awards and honors. See also[edit]

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