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The Rosetta Project : archive all ducumented human languages project

The Rosetta Project : archive all ducumented human languages project
Participate and support The Rosetta Project >> The Rosetta Disk fits in the palm of your hand, yet it contains over 13,000 pages of information on over 1,500 human languages. The pages are microscopically etched and then electroformed in solid nickel, a process that raises the text very slightly - about 100 nanometers - off of the surface of the disk. Each page is only 400 microns across - about the width of 5 human hairs - and can be read through a microscope at 650X as clearly as you would from print in a book. Individual pages are visible at a much lower magnification of 100X. The outer ring of text reads "Languages of the World" in eight major world languages.

http://rosettaproject.org/

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The Gulf/2000 Project - SIPA - COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Maps and Statistics Collections All maps and their accompanying texts that are hosted by this Gulf/2000 web site are original, authored and produced by Dr. Michael Izady who retains exclusive copyright to them all. They are frequently upgraded by him as well as new ones being posted. Martin Luther King I Have a Dream Speech - American Rhetoric Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have a Dream delivered 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C. Video Purchase Off-Site audio mp3 of Address [AUTHENTICITY CERTIFIED: Text version below transcribed directly from audio. (2)]

21 Digital Tools to Build Vocabulary l Dr. Kimberly's Literacy Blog If you follow this blog, you know that I believe effective vocabulary instruction is just about the most important instructional activity for teachers to get right. For lots of reasons. Vocabulary influences fluency, comprehension, and student achievement. How’s that for starters? In addition, a broad vocabulary is important for effective speaking, listening, reading and writing. Vocabulary is a foundational component of an effective K-12 comprehensive literacy framework.

The National Library of New Zealand Back to On the Leading Edge January 5, 2011 - While the saying "New Zealand is far from everywhere" may be true, distance is not an issue regarding its digital cultural collections and how efficiently the National Library of New Zealand makes them available over the Internet. For a small country (population approximately 4,367,700 as of June 2010), it has made wise choices that have resulted in an exemplary cyberinfrastructure and national digital library.

Garden path sentence According to one current psycholinguistic theory, as a person reads a garden path sentence, the reader builds up a structure of meaning one word at a time. At some point, it becomes clear to the reader that the next word or phrase cannot be incorporated into the structure built up thus far; it is inconsistent with the path down which they have been led. Garden path sentences are less common in spoken communication because the prosodic qualities of speech (such as the stress and the tone of voice) often serve to resolve ambiguities in the written text.

Language Hotspots In the 21st century our planet’s natural resources have become endangered. It is widely accepted that the biosphere—the sum total of the planet’s flora and fauna—is in great peril of collapsing as human populations make a massive impact on the natural world. But what is not widely known is that the human cultural “biosphere” —the sum total of all human cultures living on the planet today—is in even more peril. Over half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the world today are likely to disappear this century, and with them we will lose a wealth of knowledge about human history, culture, and the natural environment. Most of what humans know about nature is encoded only in oral languages—languages that have never been written down or recorded.

Media Standards Trust » Churnalism.com Churnalism.com is an independent, non-profit website built and run by the Media Standards Trust to help the public distinguish between original journalism and ‘churnalism’.‘Churnalism’ is a news article that is published as journalism, but is essentially a press release without much added. In his landmark book, Flat Earth News, Nick Davies wrote how ‘churnalism’ is produced by: “Journalists who are no longer gathering news but are reduced instead to passive processors of whatever material comes their way, churning out stories, whether real event or PR artifice, important or trivial, true or false” (p.59). According to the Cardiff University research that informed Davies’ book, 54% of news articles have some form of PR in them. The word ‘churnalism’ has been attributed to BBC journalist Waseem Zakir.

Software Translates Your Voice into Another Language Researchers at Microsoft have made software that can learn the sound of your voice, and then use it to speak a language that you don’t. The system could be used to make language tutoring software more personal, or to make tools for travelers. In a demonstration at Microsoft’s Redmond, Washington, campus on Tuesday, Microsoft research scientist Frank Soong showed how his software could read out text in Spanish using the voice of his boss, Rick Rashid, who leads Microsoft’s research efforts. In a second demonstration, Soong used his software to grant Craig Mundie, Microsoft’s chief research and strategy officer, the ability to speak Mandarin. Hear Rick Rashid’s voice in his native language and then translated into several other languages: English:

Home - Curation - Confluence UC3 is a creative partnership bringing together the expertise and resources of the University of California. Together we provide high quality and cost-effective solutions that enable campus constituencies — museums, libraries, archives, academic departments, research units, and individual researchers — to have direct control over the management, curation, and preservation of the information resources underpinning their scholarly activities. For more information about UC3 and our services, see our website. For specifications, documentation and technical information, see below, and please contact us with any questions: uc3 at ucop dot edu. Production Services

Everybody in Almost Every Language Says “Huh”? HUH?! Listen to one end of a phone conversation, and you’ll probably hear a rattle of ah’s, um’s and mm-hm’s. Our speech is brimming with these fillers, yet linguistic researchers haven’t paid much attention to them until now. New research by Mark Dingemanse and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, has uncovered a surprisingly important role for an interjection long dismissed as one of language’s second-class citizens: the humble huh?, a sort of voiced question mark slipped in when you don’t understand something. In fact, they’ve found, huh? is a “universal word,” the first studied by modern linguists. Steve Huffman Language Maps Dr. Stephen Huffman Contents

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