background preloader

Better Than English: Untranslatable Words

Better Than English: Untranslatable Words

http://betterthanenglish.com/

Related:  Languages

So what is there to this Indian Brahmin birdsong pre-oral tradition thing I just heard? I haven’t seen this program but I’ve studied Vedic recitations in some depth. While I personally do not believe that any of the mantras being spoken anywhere are “pre-language” (whatever they mean by that) it probably popped up in this program because it is a pretty important theological point in Sanskritic Brahmin Hinduism. In this context (the status of the Veda varies enormously within Hinduism) the Veda is the Word, the essence of the divine principal that is the fundamental building block of reality; true, unlimited, and eternal. It can be defined with the creator principle that brought forth our present reality and functions as the “divine language” that serves as the blueprint for the universe. When the Creator uttered the Vedic mantras, this brought all of the aspects of creation and the universe into being by calling them forth by name.

The Awful German Language by Mark Twain A little learning makes the whole world kin. -- Proverbs xxxii, 7. I went often to look at the collection of curiosities in Heidelberg Castle, and one day I surprised the keeper of it with my German. Animal language Animal language are forms of non-human animal communication that show similarities to human language. Animal communication may be considered complex enough to be called a form of language if: the inventory of signs is large, the signs are relatively arbitrary, and the animals produce them with a degree of volition (as opposed to conditioned instincts). Animal communication can also be evidenced through the use of lexigrams (as used by chimpanzees and bonobos) in addition to signs.

Why does fall/autumn have 2 names? Ambivalence over the name of the third season of the year reflects its status as a relatively new concept. As natural as it seems today, people haven't always thought of the year in terms of four seasons. Fifteen hundred years ago, the Anglo-Saxons marked the passage of time with just one season: winter, a concept considered equivalent to hardship or adversity that metaphorically represented the year in its entirety. Response to Quentin D. Atkinson - Languages Of The World We would like to thank Quentin D. Atkinson for taking the time to respond to our critique of the Science article by Bouckaert et al., of which he is one of the authors. While he appears to restate their team’s position rather than address specific criticisms that we had voiced, we feel that we should address those issues that Atkinson brings up in defense of their methodology. According to Atkinson, “the inferences based on linguistic palaeontology [i.e. the approach we advocate in our critique] have thus far failed to satisfy … three requirements”. First, Atkinson correctly points out that “in order to reconstruct a term to Proto-Indo-European, the common ancestor of all Indo-European languages, it must be present in those languages that are first to branch off from the base of the tree.

Should We Care About Grammar and Spelling on Twitter? Many people assume I am a guardian of grammar. The typical plane-ride conversation goes like this: “What do you do?”” “I am an English professor” “Oh! Origin of language The origin of language in the human species has been the topic of scholarly discussions for several centuries. In spite of this, there is no consensus on the ultimate origin or age of human language. One problem makes the topic difficult to study: the lack of direct evidence.

Filler (linguistics) In linguistics, a filler is a sound or word that is spoken in conversation by one participant to signal to others that he/she has paused to think but has not yet finished speaking.[1] These are not to be confused with placeholder names, such as thingamajig, which refer to objects or people whose names are temporarily forgotten, irrelevant, or unknown. Different languages have different characteristic filler sounds; in English, the most common filler sounds are uh /ʌ/, er /ɜː/ and um /ʌm/.[2] Among youths, the fillers "like", "y'know", "I mean", "so", "actually", "literally", "basically", "right", "I'm tellin' ya" and "you know what I mean?" are among the more prevalent. Ronald Reagan was famous for answering questions starting with "Well...".

Language of the birds In mythology, medieval literature and occultism, the language of the birds is postulated as a mystical, perfect divine language, green language, adamic language, enochian language, angelic language or a mythical or magical language used by birds to communicate with the initiated. History[edit] In Indo-European religion, the behavior of birds has long been used for the purposes of divination by augurs.

Lexicon Valley on the common perception that some languages are spoken faster than others Listen to Lexicon Valley Episode #18: The Rate of Exchange. We’ve all known people who are deliberate, even plodding, talkers, taking their time with seemingly every word. And then there are those who spit out their sentences with barely a breath in between. Such variation among individuals is understandable (and at times even cultural), but what about among languages themselves? In other words, is Spanish in general spoken faster than English? Is English faster than Chinese? Online English Vocabulary Size Test Ever wonder about your vocabulary size? Even if you are a daily English speaker or a native English speaker, you still might find this test challenging! We conducted academic research and looked at online resources to design the model of this quiz. We believe we've prepared the best quiz for you!English | Français | Deutsch | EspañolPortuguês | Italiano | Polski | Русский | 中文(汉语)ภาษาไทย | Bahasa Indonesia | 日本語 | 한국어Nederlands | Dansk | Suomi Loading...

shorthand "Groote" The Dutch shorthand system "Groote" was introduced in 1899 by A.W. Groote, aide to a Dutch general. Apparently he needed a system that he could use to take down the general's words while riding a horse! BALL FAN REACHES NEOLOGISM PINNACLE "This is my month," boasted the note from Devin J. Biery, of Crofton. Such "guarantees" are common among Levey's ever-confident neologism entrants. But Devin made good on his promise. He reigns as champion of our monthly make-up-a-word contest. Expressions & Sayings Index If you prefer to go directly to the meaning and origin of a specific expression, click on its relevant entry in the alphabetical list below. Use this alphabet to speed up your search: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Related: