background preloader

Better Than English: Untranslatable Words

Better Than English: Untranslatable Words

http://betterthanenglish.com/

Related:  LinguisticsLanguages

The Awful German Language by Mark Twain A little learning makes the whole world kin. -- Proverbs xxxii, 7. I went often to look at the collection of curiosities in Heidelberg Castle, and one day I surprised the keeper of it with my German. 28 Genius Depictions Of Words With No Direct English Translation They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But in this case, each image is worth just one. Designer Anjana Iyer seeks to explain untranslatable words from non-English languages, with the help of a some quirky imagery. The New Zealand-based artist's series of illustrations, each of which is accompanied by a short explainer, effectively translates words that cannot be directly anglicized. The series, "Found In Translation," draws from a variety of languages including Greek, Korean and Tshiluba (which is spoken in Democratic Republic of the Congo).

Word's to Describe Tone, Attitude, and Mood - Vocabulary List accusatory expressing the assignment of blame or guiltDiamond started to fight back, pointing an accusatory finger at the Bank of England. apathetic showing little or no emotion or animationHe also missed his first five field goal attempts and appeared apathetic about attacking the basket. awe an overwhelming feeling of wonder or admirationHis words, filled with awe, help illustrate how far he has journeyed. bitter expressive of severe grief or regretMaybe he is bitter about being nominated and not winning? cynical believing the worst of human nature and motivesFor now, though, Americans, long cynical about global warming, are confronting the facts.Questions the basic sincerity and goodness of people. condescension showing arrogance by patronizing those considered inferiorFranklin encountered condescension and negativity at SEC gatherings.

Collection of language courses Welcome to fsi-language-courses.org - the home for language courses developed by the Foreign Service Institute. These courses were developed by the United States government and are in the public domain. This site is dedicated to making these language courses freely available in an electronic format. This site is not affiliated in any way with any government entity; it is an independent, non-profit effort to foster the learning of worldwide languages.

Why does fall/autumn have 2 names? Ambivalence over the name of the third season of the year reflects its status as a relatively new concept. As natural as it seems today, people haven't always thought of the year in terms of four seasons. Fifteen hundred years ago, the Anglo-Saxons marked the passage of time with just one season: winter, a concept considered equivalent to hardship or adversity that metaphorically represented the year in its entirety. Words that have no equivalent in English Schadenfreude — a feeling not unknown to former Prime Minister Julia Gillard right now. Source: Supplied But what about the perfect word for those other times you need to sum up a complex feeling? These excellent words listed below have no English equivalent. It’s just a small smattering of what’s out there, and some have even been turned into artwork by New Zealand artist Anjana Iyer.

100 Open Courses to Learn Any New Language Learning a new language can be a great way to challenge your mind, meet people from different cultures and even add a valuable asset to your resume and hireability. While traditional courses can be great, there are a number of free courses on the web that can help teach you the basics of language learning and get you on the path to fluency without having to spend a fortune. Here are 100 resources we’ve found that will help you become multilingual in your choice of languages. French French is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world and an official language in countries on nearly every continent.

Should We Care About Grammar and Spelling on Twitter? Many people assume I am a guardian of grammar. The typical plane-ride conversation goes like this: “What do you do?”” “I am an English professor” “Oh! 12 Wonderfully Quirky Words with No English Equivalent In They Have A Word For It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases, Howard Rheingold describes many words from other languages that express things English can’t—at least not succinctly. Here are just a few of our favorites. 1. Treppenwitz We often think of the perfect comeback long after the opportunity for that comeback has presented itself.

Ambiguous Sentences I came across this headline in the Wall Street Journal: Republicans Grill IRS Chief Over Lost Emails This type of sentence has great possibilities because of its two different interpretations: Republicans harshly question the chief about the emailsRepublicans cook the chief using email as the fuel It’s a perfect tool to: demonstrate careful reading, showcase the need for editing, and encourage creativity and divergent thinking. Even More Meanings How to Learn a Foreign Language - Memory Techniques from MindTools © iStockphoto/topshotUK Systems Needed Using the Tools Filler (linguistics) In linguistics, a filler is a sound or word that is spoken in conversation by one participant to signal to others that he/she has paused to think but has not yet finished speaking.[1] These are not to be confused with placeholder names, such as thingamajig, which refer to objects or people whose names are temporarily forgotten, irrelevant, or unknown. Different languages have different characteristic filler sounds; in English, the most common filler sounds are uh /ʌ/, er /ɜː/ and um /ʌm/.[2] Among youths, the fillers "like", "y'know", "I mean", "so", "actually", "literally", "basically", "right", "I'm tellin' ya" and "you know what I mean?" are among the more prevalent. Ronald Reagan was famous for answering questions starting with "Well...".

38 Wonderful Foreign Words We Could Use in English Sometimes we must turn to other languages to find le mot juste. Here are a whole bunch of foreign words with no direct English equivalent. 1. Kummerspeck (German) Excess weight gained from emotional overeating. Literally, grief bacon. Fundamentals of Fiction, Part III: Critique Groups and Writers' Groups Fundamentals of Fiction, Part III: Critique Groups and Writers' Groups by Marg Gilks Return to Fiction Tips & Techniques · Print-Friendly Version "You must want to enough. Enough to take all the rejections, enough to pay the price of disappointment and discouragement while you are learning. Like any other artist you must learn your craft -- then you can add all the genius you like." -- Phyllis A.

Related: