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Language: What foreign words are difficult to translate into English

잘한척 in Korean, transliterated roughly "jalhancheok". It's a gerund that translates literally to "acting as if (one has) done well" but the speaker means that the actor is in fact wrong, what they did was incorrect and/or stupid, and the attitude is undeserved. The closest succinct way to explain it would be "gloating for something you don't deserve to be gloating about". Not for Reproduction

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