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Lucid Dreaming Research

Lucid Dreaming Research
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Lucid dream A lucid dream is any dream in which one is aware that one is dreaming. In relation to this phenomenon, Greek philosopher Aristotle observed: "often when one is asleep, there is something in consciousness which declares that what then presents itself is but a dream".[1] One of the earliest references to personal experiences with lucid dreaming was by Marie-Jean-Léon, Marquis d'Hervey de Saint Denys.[2] Skeptics of the phenomenon suggest that it is not a state of sleep, but of brief wakefulness.[15][16] Others point out that there is no way to prove the truth of lucid dreaming other than to ask the dreamer.[17] Lucid dreaming has been researched scientifically, with participants performing pre-determined physical responses while experiencing a lucid dream.[18][19] Scientific history[edit] Philosopher Norman Malcolm's 1959 text Dreaming[22] had argued against the possibility of checking the accuracy of dream reports. Hearne's results were not widely distributed. Initiation[edit] REM sleep.

Carl Jung Resources for Home Study and Practice DMT, Moses, and the Quest for Transcendence by Cliff Pickover, Reality Carnival "DMT in the pineal glands of Biblical prophets gave God to humanity and let ordinary humans perceive parallel universes." The molecule DMT (N,N-Dimethyltryptamine) is a psychoactive chemical that causes intense visions and can induce its users to quickly enter a completely different "environment" that some have likened to an alien or parallel universe. The transition from our world to theirs occurs with no cessation of consciousness or quality of awareness. Author Terence McKenna has used DMT and feels that, "Right here and now, one quanta away, there is raging a universe of active intelligence that is transhuman, hyperdimensional, and extremely alien... DMT is also naturally produced in small quantities in the human brain, and it has been hypothesized that DMT is produced in the pineal gland in the brain. Is it possible that the reality exposed to humans by injecting DMT is in some sense a valid reality, on par with our normal reality?

Making a dream date - Dream Gates "At the Foothills of Mt Helen". B.K.Connelly, 1981 You’re separated from your sweetheart and you’d like to have some good private time together. Can you do that? Absolutely. If you are embarking on shared dreaming as home entertainment, you get to choose your category. I know what I am talking about. Want to try this? But shared dreaming doesn’t require you to start out from the same place, or even on the same continent. To keep this simple, let’s assume you have a friend who is not physically present, with whom you’d like to share a dream adventure. 1. You might simply agree to try to meet in your dreams on (say) Wednesday night. 2. If you’re new to this kind of thing, it’s probably best to start out with a place in the physical world that one or both of you know. 3. The idea of simply hanging out with your partner in a delightful locale – and not having to pay for the plane ticket or the five-star hotel suite – may be juicy enough. 4. 5. 6.

You Are Not So Smart Lucid Dreaming | Mortal Mist Psychoanalysis of MYTH - Applying Jung Jung's theories have certainly been ap­plied to the study of myth - abundantly so. But not in their entirety. The collec­tive unconscious and the process toward self-realization are psychoana­lytical components with little meaning to historians of religion, and dreadfully difficult to work with when examining mythological material. The archetypes, on the other hand, have flourished in interpretations of myths. Campbell, Eliade and others have not exactly adapted the archetypes as such, although several of those scholars admit to their existence and importance, but they have used the idea of extracting symbolic elements from the myths, and comparing these across cultural borders. Myths do have lots of similarities, no matter what culture or time they come from, and these similarities can easily be described in a manner approaching that of the archetypes. The question then is: are they symbols carrying additional meaning, or are they just heroes, sages, floods, journeys, and so forth?

Rituals enhance health Study finds no deficits among American Indians who use peyote regularly American Indians who use the hallucinogen peyote regularly in connection with religious ceremonies show no evidence of brain damage or psychological problems, report researchers at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital. In fact, members of the Navajo tribe who regularly use peyote actually scored significantly better on several measures of overall mental health than did subjects from the same tribe who were not members of the religious group and did not use the hallucinogen, according to a paper published in the Nov. 4 issue of Biological Psychiatry. "We found no evidence that these Native Americans had residual neurocognitive problems. Beyond that, the peyote users scored better on several measures of the Rand Mental Health Inventory (RMHI), a test used to diagnose psychological problems and determine overall mental health, he said. "This study applies only to Native Americans in this church," said Harrison G.

The Best Lucid Dreaming Techniques Movies like Inception and Avatar have made lucid dreaming a household word. The buzz around the idea that we can wake up in our dreams ripples outwards, rocking our collective boat as more us realize that the world as we know it is malleable and magical. But lucid dreaming can be difficult to learn. What I suggest is simple, but not necessarily easy. While dreams can open us up to new possibilities, most of the time our interests, preoccupations and cognitive abilities in dreams mirror the same constructs that we nurture in waking life. Towards Lucid Living Practice gratitude. Breathe. Feel your dreambody. See if you can give a name to this feeling: heart-achiness, burning belly, or fluttery chest. Lucidity is in the Mind and the Body Words confine, awareness defines This simple exercise, drawn from the work of psychologists Arnold Mindell and Eugene Genlin, puts us in direct contact with the dreambody. But in our dreams, the dreambody is front and center. The Path Up is Down

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