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"Cargo Cult Science" - by Richard Feynman

"Cargo Cult Science" - by Richard Feynman
Richard Feynman From a Caltech commencement address given in 1974 Also in Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas--which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn't work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. But even today I meet lots of people who sooner or later get me into a conversation about UFO's, or astrology, or some form of mysticism, expanded consciousness, new types of awareness, ESP, and so forth. Most people believe so many wonderful things that I decided to investigate why they did. At Esalen there are some large baths fed by hot springs situated on a ledge about thirty feet above the ocean. One time I sat down in a bath where there was a beautiful girl sitting with a guy who didn't seem to know her. Yet these things are said to be scientific.

http://neurotheory.columbia.edu/~ken/cargo_cult.html

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