background preloader

Information Philosopher - Introduction

Information Philosopher - Introduction
Introduction The Information Philosopher has established that quantum mechanics and thermodynamics play a central role in the creation of all things. This finding has enormous implications for philosophy and metaphysics. Instead of a closed universe that is winding down deterministically from an initial state of high information, we find the universe is open and increasing information indeterministically from an initial state of relatively high entropy and low information. Information is being continuously created in the universe, not least by human beings who are just learning that they are part of the cosmic creative process. An open indeterministic universe with increasing information suggests three testable philosophical ideas: a model for free will and creativity that may satisfy determinists and libertarians a value system based on providential processes in the universe an epistemological explanation of knowledge formation and communication. Man is Free. For Teachers For Scholars Related:  PhilosophyKnowledge Websites

Candyland and the Nature of the Absurd Candyland and the Nature of the Absurd Sartre and Camus told everyone that their falling out was over politics, but really it was mostly over Sartre evoking "radical freedom" one too many times at game night Permanent Link to this Comic: Support the comic on Patreon <map name="admap76971" id="admap76971"><area href=" shape="rect" coords="0,0,728,90" title="" alt="" target="_blank" /></map><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width:728px;border-style:none;background-color:#ffffff;"><tr><td><img src="

Home - Floating University Why not Stoicism? by Massimo Pigliucci Stoicism has been in the back of my mind since I was very young, initially for the obviously parochial reason that it was the prevalent philosophy among the ancient Romans, i.e., part of my broadly construed cultural heritage. (Then again it is for the same reason that Buddhism is very popular in India, Confucianism in China, and Shinto in Japan.) Lately, however, Stoicism has slowly moved to the forefront of my cognitive field of view, for a number of reasons. To begin with, I’ve been interested in philosophical counseling [1], to the point of having taken the American Philosophical Practice Association course [2], and having set up what is turning out to be a surprisingly successful and enjoyable practice [3]. Meanwhile, I had also heard of “Stoic Week” an annual event (and associated sociological study) organized by the University of Exeter. Finally — and I don’t mean to sound morbid here — but, I need to start preparing for my own death. What about metaphysics?

Divided Core - Nature Philographics — Genis Carreras Philographics Philographics is a series of posters that explain big ideas in simple shapes. They are the result of combining the world of philosophy with graphic design. You can get the entire set of 95 designs as a book or a selection of them as posters. Cart - 0 items

OUPblog | Oxford University Press’s Academic Insights for the World The History of Philosophy in an Infographic | Motivated Mastery “Let not the youngest shun philosophy or the oldest grow weary of it,” said Epicurus to Meniceus in a letter. “To do so is the equivalent to saying either that the time for a happy life has not yet come or that it is already past.” And yet, it’s not a default choice to turn to philosophy as a guide to learning to live well. Depending on your experience in traditional education, philosophy may have been one of those subjects that was pushed to the side like vegetables, either because it was too abstract or because the kind of critical thinking that’s necessary to delve into the subject is seemingly too tiring (this also applies, sadly, to science, art, and math). The Greek stoic philosopher Epictetus said, “Philosophy’s main task is to respond to the soul’s cry; to make sense of and thereby free ourselves from the hold of our griefs and fears.” Like religion or sports, there isn’t one right school of philosophy to follow, the same way there isn’t one way to exercise or practice faith.

In the Spirit of Seatco, Sasquatch, Indians, Geography, and Science in the Nineteenth Century In the Spirit of Seatco Sasquatch, Indians, Geography, and Science in the Nineteenth Century By Henry J Franzoni III Over 4000 Indian place name coordinates compatible with Google Earth Over 60 maps providing detailed coverage of place names across North America Many Indian legends presented, interpreted, and explained Seatco is a nineteenth century term from the Chinook Jargon, the one-time trade language of the Pacific Northwest. Indians described the Seatco as a mysterious tribe of Indians that possessed puzzling powers... among which was their ability to kill game with hypnotic power and their ability to turn invisible. Sold out and out of print, only PDF copies on CD are available... purchase a copy, please use this Pay Pal button: Only PDF copies on CD are available... 10$ plus Shipping and Handling.

Graphing the history of philosophy | Coppelia A close up of ancient and medieval philosophy ending at Descartes and Leibniz If you are interested in this data set you might like my latest post where I use it to make book recommendations. This one came about because I was searching for a data set on horror films (don’t ask) and ended up with one describing the links between philosophers. To cut a long story very short I’ve extracted the information in the influenced by section for every philosopher on Wikipedia and used it to construct a network which I’ve then visualised using gephi It’s an easy process to repeat. First I’ll show why I think it’s worked as a visualisation. Each philosopher is a node in the network and the lines between them (or edges in the terminology of graph theory) represents lines of influence. It gets more interesting when we use Gephi to identify communities (or modules) within the network. It has been fairly successful. The Continental Tradition The graph is probably most insightful when you zoom in close.

The Quest For Gnosis — Gabriel D. Roberts Those who have read my other works know that I came from fundamentalist Christian background; a mindset that clearly set boundaries of what I should and should not believe. This book may touch on some of those ideas in conversation, but will not be the primary focus here, instead the focus is upon equipping you with a new sense of wonder and understanding of just how big this omniverse is and just how amazing a part of it you can be. Though you will find the definition to vary within the pages of this book, the term Gnosis in its most basic form simply means knowledge. Going more deeply Gnosis means intrinsic knowledge of a mystical nature; something that is personal and experiential. When I think about the legacy that many of the great spiritual leaders, martyrs, shamans, philosophers and mystics have left us, I feel a sense of awe and inspiration. Poetic speech is nice, but it does little to stem the tide of real evil at work in this world.

Related: