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Forces

Forces
Related:  Interactives; Virtual Tours; Virtual Labs

The Physics Classroom Virtual Tour: Panoramic Images: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History This comprehensive virtual tour allows visitors using a desktop computer (Windows, Mac, Linux) or a mobile device (iPhone, iPad, Android) to take a virtual, self-guided, room-by-room walking tour of the whole museum. You can even browse a list of past exhibits, which is included on the ground floor map (see upper right map buttons). The visitor can navigate from room to room by clicking map locations or by following blue arrow links on the floor that connect the rooms. The desktop version includes camera icons to indicate hotspots where the visitor can get a close-up view of a particular object or exhibit panel. Please note: This tour is provided in Flash and HTML5 / Javascript versions. Please note: The National Fossil Hall is currently closed for renovation. Site Credit: Imagery and coding by Loren Ybarrondo.

Physics Flash Animations We have been increasingly using Flash animations for illustrating Physics content. This page provides access to those animations which may be of general interest. The animations will appear in a separate window. The animations are sorted by category, and the file size of each animation is included in the listing. Also included is the minimum version of the Flash player that is required; the player is available free from The categories are: In addition, I have prepared a small tutorial in using Flash to do Physics animations. LInks to versions of these animations in other languages, other links, and license information appear towards the bottom of this page. The Animations There are 99 animations listed below. Other Languages and Links These animations have been translated into Catalan, Spanish and Basque: En aquest enllaç podeu trobar la versió al català de les animacions Flash de Física.

The Transistor Lists of Nobel Prizes and Laureates The Transistor Play the Transistor Recycler Game About the game A transistor is made of a solid piece of a semiconductor material and either used as switches, to turn electronic signals on or off – or, as amplifiers. Read More » The Nobel Prize The 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for the invention of the transistor. Readings Learn about how a transistor functions and try build a replica The Transistor in a Century of Electronics Share this: Share on facebook Share on google_plusone_share Share on twitter More Sharing Services7 Share on email To cite this pageMLA style: "The Transistor". Recommended: The Legacy of Alfred Nobel On 27 November 1895 Alfred Nobel signed his last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about human blood types! Unlocking the Secrets of Our Cells Discover the 2012 awarded research on stem cells and cell signalling. Contact E-mail us Press Sitemap A-Z Index Frequently Asked Questions Terms Follow Facebook

KS2 Bitesize Science - Friction : Play Friction is a force between two surfaces that are sliding, or trying to slide, across each other. For example, when you try to push a book along the floor, friction makes this difficult. Friction always works in the direction opposite to the direction in which the object is moving, or trying to move. Friction always slows a moving object down. The amount of friction depends on the materials from which the two surfaces are made. Friction can be a useful force because it prevents our shoes slipping on the pavement when we walk and stops car tyres skidding on the road. Sometimes we want to reduce friction. Eyes on the Earth NASA Explore Earth's Vital Signs View recent data for air temperature, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, sea level, ozone, ice and water. Fly along with NASA Satellites Follow NASA satellites and learn how they collect critical data about Earth's atmosphere, land and oceans. View the latest Image of the Day

Edheads - Activate Your Mind! physicscentral PHYSICS 102 - ΦΥΣΙΚΗ II - Virtual Lab |Διαλέξεις | Φροντιστήρια | Υλη | Email List | Βιβλιογραφία || Ιστοσελιδα 2000 | Ιστοσελιδα 2001 | Εικονικο Εργαστηριο Φυσικης ΙΙ Στη σελιδα αυτη θα βρητε συνδεσμους σε applets που προσομοιωνουν πειραματα σχετικα με την υλη του μαθηματος. Μπορειτε να βρητε και αλλα applets στη φυσικη στη σελιδα του physics web Institute of Physics Η σελίδα είναι υπο κατασκευή και θα ανανεώνεται συνεχώς. Αν βρητε σπασμενους συνδεσμους η εχετε να συνεισφερετε ιδεες η προγραμματα επικοινωνηστε με τον διδασκοντα. Συστολη Μηκους

Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky Simple animation to explain complex principles - Electronics 1, aircraft radial engine 2, oval Regulation 3, sewing machines 4, Malta Cross movement - second hand movement used to control the clock 5, auto change file mechanism 6, auto constant velocity universal joint 6.gif 7, gun ammunition loading system 8 rotary engine - an internal combustion engine, the heat rather than the piston movement into rotary movement # Via World Of Technology. 1, inline engine - it's cylinders lined up side by side 2, V-type engine - cylinder arranged at an angle of two plane 3, boxer engine - cylinder engine arranged in two planes relative

APlusPhysics - High School Physics and AP Physics Online OSP Simulations Overview » home » Simulations » Overview Overview Search for OSP Simulations or browse by topic Applications There are three ways to distribute and run Java programs. Java Applications Java Web Start Java Applets Each distribution method is slightly different and has its advantages and disadvantages. Other websites or curriculum developers may adopt a different distribution mechanism and additional pages in this section show how Open Source Physics programs can be distributed as applets and using Web Start. A classical-physics model of helium consisting of two electrons in a 1/r potential well and interacting through a 1/r potential. Example: Download the classical helium simulation and run the mech_helium.jar file. Jar Files Ready to run OSP models are packaged in a Java archive (jar) file such as osp_demo.jar of osp_guide.jar. Users may also execute a jar file from within a console (terminal) although it is unlikely that students will want to deal with the complexities of command-line syntax.

Nuclear reactor and power plant simulation Introduction This is not a lesson like the others in Radioactivity and Atomic Physics Explained but it fits in well with the lesson on nuclear power. It is a very sophisticated simulation of a pressurised water reactor (PWR), which is the most common type of nuclear power reactor in the US but not in Europe, though the principles are very similar. Using the tour There is a comprehensive tour which goes through the workings of the reactor, starting from a consumer of electrical energy and working backwards to the reactor core itself. You can restart the tour at any time using the button at the top left of the screen. Hint numbers Each part of the simulation has a hint number that you can click to see a description of its function. The skill test Once you're familiar with how to use the reactor you can see whether you can control the reactor so that the power output matches the demand from the city. Back to Summary of Radioactivity and Atomic Physics Explained

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