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One-Minute Physics archive

One-Minute Physics archive
Sandrine Ceurstemont, editor, New Scientist TV What's part of the universe? You may think of it as incorporating everything that exists - both on Earth and in space - but could it also include the unknown? In this One-Minute Physics episode, film-maker Henry Reich delves into the notion of the universe as described by physics, distinguishing between the whole universe and what's observable. He looks at the three components of the universe that we are sure of and whether mathematics could be included or not. Then there is the concept of parallel universes that could extend our understanding of space. If you enjoyed this post, check out our previous animations, to find out, for example, if space is infinite or why mass has a split personality. Ever been mesmerised by patterns of light at the bottom of a swimming pool? Time travel in the real world isn't yet possible. MacGregor Campbell, contributor We interact with the concept of mass every day. MacGregor Campbell, consultant

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Related:  Quantum Reality

Heads Up, Hoverboarders: Here Comes Quantum Levitation Few motifs of science fiction cinema have been more appealing to us than the subtle defiance of gravity offered by futuristic hovercraft. So every once in a while we check in to see how humanity is progressing on that front, and whether the promise of hoverboards will be delivered by 2015 as evidenced in Back to the Future Part 2. We’re not quite there yet, but we’re definitely getting off the ground, so to speak. Get ready to hover your brain around the art of quantum levitation. Top 10 Schools of Philosophy Miscellaneous Through history, various forms of philosophy have developed. Many have fallen by the wayside but a number have stuck. Time Time is a measured or measurable period, a continuum that lacks spatial dimensions. Time is of philosophical interest and is also the subject of mathematical and scientific investigation. It is a component of the measuring system used to sequence events, to compare the durations of events and the intervals between them, and to quantify the motions of objects. Time has been a major subject of religion, philosophy, and science, but defining it in a non-controversial manner applicable to all fields of study has consistently eluded the greatest scholars. In physics as well as in other sciences, time is considered one of the few fundamental quantities. Time is used to define other quantities – such as velocity – so defining time in terms of such quantities would result in circularity of definition.

Nuclear Weapons - basic technology concepts [UNC] A few words about nuclear weapons technology.. Fission weapons Nuclear weapons exploit two principle physical, or more specifically nuclear, properties of certain substances: fission and fusion. Fission is possible in a number of heavy elements, but in weapons it is principally confined to what is termed slow neutron fission in just two particular isotopes: 235U and 239Pu. MIT Creates New Energy Source This is some pretty exciting news. It seems that researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), one of the most prestigious science and engineering schools in the United States, has created a new energy source -- and it's clean and renewable. The odd thing is that the only way you can see this energy source is with a very powerful microscope, because it is created by using nanotechnology.

Alcubierre Warp Drive Time Travel An Alcubierre Warp Drive stretches spacetime in a wave causing the fabric of space ahead of a spacecraft to contract and the space behind it to expand. The ship can ride the wave to accelerate to high speeds and time travel. The Alcubierre drive, also known as the Alcubierre metric or Warp Drive, is a mathematical model of a spacetime exhibiting features reminiscent of the fictional "warp drive" from Star Trek, which can travel "faster than light" (although not in a local sense - see below). The key characteristics of the application of Alcubierre warp drives for time control and time travel are presented in the picture below.

Science, Pseudoscience, and Irrationalism Steven Dutch, Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay First-time Visitors: Please visit Site Map and Disclaimer. Use "Back" to return here. What's Here and Not Here, And Why Antimatter belt around Earth discovered by Pamela craft 7 August 2011Last updated at 10:54 The antiprotons lie sandwiched between the inner and outer Van Allen belts (in red) around the Earth A thin band of antimatter particles called antiprotons enveloping the Earth has been spotted for the first time. The find, described in Astrophysical Journal Letters, confirms theoretical work that predicted the Earth's magnetic field could trap antimatter. The team says a small number of antiprotons lie between the Van Allen belts of trapped "normal" matter. The researchers say there may be enough to implement a scheme using antimatter to fuel future spacecraft.

Scientists probe the idea of chronesthesia Yes... much of remembering the past means reconstructing it, not just re-experiencing it, and contemplating the future requires similar "construction." It's why people can easily confabulate details in their memory—"remembering" things differently to how they actually happened, particularly when they're asked leading questions. It's a potent tool, this ability to remember the past and the future; but prone to error. Not to mention, thinking of the past and the future often distracts us from the present in potentially destructive ways. When your mind is someplace else, you're missing what's really going on right now.

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