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Tartarus

Tartarus
Greek mythology[edit] In Greek mythology, Tartarus is both a deity and a place in the underworld. In ancient Orphic sources and in the mystery schools, Tartarus is also the unbounded first-existing entity from which the Light and the cosmos are born. As for the place, Hesiod asserts that a bronze anvil falling from heaven would fall nine days before it reached the earth. The anvil would take nine more days to fall from earth to Tartarus.[3] In The Iliad (c. 700 BC), Zeus asserts that Tartarus is "as far beneath Hades as heaven is high above the earth." Originally, Tartarus was used only to confine dangers to the gods of Olympus. According to Plato (c. 427 BC), Rhadamanthus, Aeacus and Minos were the judges of the dead and chose who went to Tartarus. Plato also proposes the concept that sinners were cast under the ground to be punished in accordance with their sins in the Myth of Er. There were a number of entrances to Tartarus in Greek mythology. Roman mythology[edit] New Testament[edit]

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