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Teaching_strategies

Teaching_strategies
Natural Hazards• ELI Natural Hazards category Plate tectonicsPlate tectonics - whole concept:-• Partial melting - simple process, huge global impact (ELI+)• Partial melting model and real rock (ELI+)• Plate riding (ELI+)• Plate tectonics through the window (ELI+) Evidence and explanation for the theory:-• Continental jigsaw puzzle (ELI+)• Earth time jigsaw puzzle• Geobattleships (ELI+)• Wegener’s ‘Continental drift’ meets Wilson’s ‘Plate tectonics’ (ELI+)• Did the continents move for you? (ELI+) Mechanism:-• Bouncing, bending, breaking• Mantle plume in a beaker (ELI+)• What drives the plates? Constructive or divergent plate margins:-• Mantle plume in a beaker (ELI+)• Magnetic stripes (ELI+)• Model a spreading ocean offset by transform faults (ELI+)• Continental split - the opening of the Atlantic Ocean Resources• Make your own oil and gas reservoir• Trapped! Rocks• Rock detective - rocky clues to the past• Modelling for rocks - what’s hidden inside and why?

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It Takes Teamwork: How Endosymbiosis Changed Life on Earth It Takes Teamwork: How Endosymbiosis Changed Life on Earthby the Understanding Evolution team In 1966, microbiologist Kwang Jeon was studying single-celled organisms called amoebae, when his amoebae communities were struck by an unexpected plague: a bacterial infection. Literally thousands of the tiny invaders — named x-bacteria by Jeon — squeezed inside each amoeba cell, causing the cell to become dangerously sick. Only a few amoebae survived the epidemic. However, several months later, the few surviving amoebae and their descendents seemed to be unexpectedly healthy. Had the amoebae finally managed to fight off the x-bacterial infection?

ENSI/SENSI: Evolution/Nat.of Sci.Home Page 14 January 2016 Announcing the 2016 Evolution Film Festival and Video Contest! Scientists and science educators of all stripes — students, postdocs, faculty, and full- or part-time science communicators — are invited to enter the Sixth Annual Evolution Video Competition, sponsored by the Duke Initiative for Science & Society, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Society for the Study of Evolution (SSE) and the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action. First- and second-place winners will receive up to $1,000 and $500, respectively. The deadline to submit your video(s) is TUESDAY, MAY 31st, 2016 (11:00 PM, EST). For more information (and to see entries from previous years) please visit evolutionfilmfestival.org or contact Jory Weintraub (jory@duke.edu)

Delta Education FOSS Middle School Complete Courses - FOSS Middle School Second Edition Earth History Grades 6 - 8 The revised FOSS Earth History course draws from the original course's rich, active-learning investigations to develop an understanding of Earth processes, then delves in far greater depth into the rock cycle, human interactions with natural resources, and technology that supports the geosciences. The course consists of nine investigations that engage students in reading evidence from rocks, landforms, and fossils to tell the geological story of a place. Instructionally, the course has been enhanced by the addition of embedded notebooking techniques, recommended homework assignments, and greater support for in-class readings and multimedia activities.

Virtual Labs The links on this page are all VIRTUAL LABS offered by the Glencoe textbook company. These labs give the students the adventure of laboratory experimentation without costly supplies, worrisome environmental and safety issues, or time-consuming clean up. They are from all different areas of science: Biology, Physics, Genetics, Earth Science, Physical Science, and Chemistry. Please feel free to try these at home! Students will be directed to specific labs in class but there are over 100 labs offered here! Explicit cookie consent RAED KHADER, a Jordanian driver, has an alarming habit of thumbing his mobile phone while at the wheel—albeit on a straight road cutting across the desert. But after scrolling back through almost two years of photos, he finds a picture that tickles him: of camels against a sandy backdrop. Today that same spot outside Ma’an, a poverty-stricken city in south Jordan, is crawling with workers in the final stages of installing five square kilometres (almost two square miles) of solar panels.

AIDS: Evolution of an Epidemic Bruce Walker, MD and Bisola Ojikutu, MD, MPH are passionate about fighting the global AIDS epidemic. Walker focuses on vaccine development in the lab, while Ojikutu works in the clinic and focuses on epidemiology. Complementing their U.S.-based research, each spends several months a year in Durban in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province—a region at the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in South Africa and the place with the highest incidence of HIV infection in the world. For Walker and Ojikutu, HIV research and community work go hand in hand. They are involved in myriad programs that deliver health care to infected individuals while also doing research to improve and develop treatments for AIDS.

The Adaptation Assessment Probe I'm taking a MOOC on evolution that's designed for educators [Evolution: A Course for Educators]. One of the things that was covered in the first lecture was a test on "adpatation" taken from a book called "Uncovering Student Ideas in Science, Volume 4: 25 New Formative Assessment Probes. The book is published by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). Let's take the test ... Adaptation Rare Dinosaur-Era Bird Wings Found Trapped in Amber Two tiny wings entombed in amber reveal that plumage (the layering, patterning, coloring, and arrangement of feathers) seen in birds today already existed in at least some of their predecessors nearly a hundred million years ago. A study of the mummified wings, published in the June 28 issue of Nature Communications and funded in part by the National Geographic Society's Expeditions Council, indicated they most likely belonged to enantiornithes , a group of avian dinosaurs that became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period. (Read more about the evolution from dinosaurs to modern birds.) 'Mind-Blowingly Cool' While the fact that many, if not nearly all, dinosaurs were feathered has been generally accepted since the 1990s, our knowledge of prehistoric plumage until now has come from feather imprints in carbonized compression fossils and individual feathers fossilized in amber. (See dinosaurs in their feathered glory.)

Inquiry and Integration Across the Curriculum Every time we open the local newspaper, listen to the evening news, or visit our favorite national online news source, we’re confronted with stories that directly or indirectly tell us something about the state of the planet. Whether it’s a debate about zoning ordinances for construction in wetland areas, the line item for fossil fuels costs in the annual school budget, local industrial soil contamination, or the price of gasoline at the pump, issues of environmental sustainability permeate our lives. Exploring the impact of human activity on the environment provides high school students with an opportunity to understand these issues from the inside out.

Debating the link between emissions and population There are those who perceive any effort to limit population growth as "population control." This is a term that chillingly evokes coercive state intervention to control individual reproductive behavior. Population control programs have rarely been implemented without exacting unacceptable ethical costs.

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