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UCMP Web Time Machine

UCMP Web Time Machine
Online exhibits Geologic time scale Take a journey back through the history of the Earth — jump to a specific time period using the time scale below and examine ancient life, climates, and geography. You might wish to start in the Cenozoic Era (65.5 million years ago to the present) and work back through time, or start with Hadean time (4.6 to 4 billion years ago)* and journey forward to the present day — it's your choice. [Note: "mya" means "millions of years ago"] Ways to begin your exploration: Use the links in the "time machine" below and explore a specific period that interests you.Read more about the geologic time scale, its origins and its time divisions.Find out more about plate tectonics, an important geological concept in any time period!

http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/help/timeform.php

Related:  Echelles des temps géologiquesLe temps en géologie, Frise chronologiqueTimeline tools and resources.Geologic Time and Bedrock Geology

Civil Rights Movement Timeline (14th Amendment, 1964 Act, Human Rights Law) Jan. 23 The 24th Amendment abolishes the poll tax, which originally had been instituted in 11 southern states after Reconstruction to make it difficult for poor blacks to vote. Summer The Council of Federated Organizations (COFO), a network of civil rights groups that includes CORE and SNCC, launches a massive effort to register black voters during what becomes known as the Freedom Summer. It also sends delegates to the Democratic National Convention to protest—and attempt to unseat—the official all-white Mississippi contingent.

GEOLOGIC EONS, ERAS and PERIODS - Paleontology and Geology Glossary Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member? Click here.) Hadean: Overview The name Hadean Eon comes from Hades, the underworld of Greek mythology. It refers to the “hellish” conditions of the Earth during the earliest part of its history, when much of the Earth’s surface remained molten. The Hadean Eon of geologic time began with the birth of the solar system, including our planet, Earth, and ended with the formation of the oldest rocks that are still preserved on the surface of Earth. The Hadean is the first period in Earth history, but one for which we have little record. The Earth began to form about 4.6 billion years ago through the condensation of material around the sun. As this material collected, further cosmic material was drawn to it by gravity from all directions, increasing the size of the Earth.

List of timelines From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of timelines currently on Wikipedia. §Types[edit] Geologic Time Scale I Title: Geologic Time Scale IAuthor: Tamara McDaniel, Lake Geneva Middle School 600 Bloomfield Rd. Lake Geneva, WI 53147Tamara.mcdaniel@badger.k12.wi.us Grades: 7-8 (Spiraled) (See Geologic Time Scale II for the 8th grade activity)

Brief Timeline of American Literature and Events, 1620-1920 Brief Timeline of American Literature and Events: Pre-1620 to 1920 This timeline provides a short chronology of events in American history and literature. It is linked to course pages and bibliographies as well as to a set of more general linked resources: pages on American authors, literary movements, and American literature sites. Each author page contains a picture (if available), a bibliography (if available), links to major sites about the author, and links to works online.

Geologic Time Projects/Labs: lewiston Radiometric Dating Atom Decay and Half-Life Simulation. Click Link: Geologic Time Scale - Geological Time Line - Geology.com Dividing Earth History into Time Intervals Geologists have divided Earth's history into a series of time intervals. These time intervals are not equal in length like the hours in a day. Instead the time intervals are variable in length. This is because geologic time is divided using significant events in the history of the Earth. Examples of Boundary "Events"

Halflife The applet lists a "halflife" for each radioactive isotope. What does that mean? The halflife is the amount of time it takes for half of the atoms in a sample to decay. The halflife for a given isotope is always the same ; it doesn't depend on how many atoms you have or on how long they've been sitting around. For example, the applet will tell you that the halflife of beryllium 11 is 13.81 seconds.

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