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Geologic time scale

Geologic time scale
The geologic time scale (GTS) is a system of chronological measurement that relates stratigraphy to time, and is used by geologists, paleontologists, and other earth scientists to describe the timing and relationships between events that have occurred throughout Earth's history. The table of geologic time spans presented here agrees with the nomenclature, dates and standard color codes set forth by the International Commission on Stratigraphy. Evidence from radiometric dating indicates that the Earth is about 4.54 billion years old. The geology or deep time of Earth's past has been organized into various units according to events which took place in each period. Different spans of time on the GTS are usually delimited by changes in the composition of strata which correspond to them, indicating major geological or paleontological events, such as mass extinctions. Terminology[edit] History and nomenclature of the time scale[edit] Graphical representation of Earth's history as a spiral

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geologic_time_scale

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Geological history of Earth Geologic time represented in a diagram called a geological clock, showing the relative lengths of the eons of Earth's history and noting major events The geological history of Earth follows the major events in Earth's past based on the geologic time scale, a system of chronological measurement based on the study of the planet's rock layers (stratigraphy). Earth formed about 4.54 billion years ago by accretion from the solar nebula, a disk-shaped mass of dust and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, which also created the rest of the Solar System. As the surface continually reshaped itself over hundreds of millions of years, continents formed and broke apart. They migrated across the surface, occasionally combining to form a supercontinent. Roughly 750 million years ago, the earliest-known supercontinent Rodinia, began to break apart.

AMNH, NY: Permanent Exhibitions The Biodiversity and Environmental Halls offer a vivid and inspiring vision of the spectacular beauty and abundance of life on Earth. The Museum’s Birds Halls portray the wide variety of avian life on the planet, and the Hall of Reptiles and Amphibians reviews the anatomy, behavior, and various adaptations of these vertebrates. The Earth and Planetary Sciences halls showcase remarkable specimens, including meteorites, minerals, and rare gems, that offer clues about the origins of our solar system and the dynamic processes of our planet. One of the premier attractions in New York City is the Museum's series of fossil halls, including its two famed dinosaur halls in the David H. Koch Dinosaur Wing, as well as the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives. The Hall of Human Origins explores the evolutionary story of the human family, while the Cultural Halls examine the cultures of Asia, Africa, North and South America, and the Pacific.

Geological history of Earth Geologic time represented in a diagram called a geological clock, showing the relative lengths of the eons of Earth's history and noting major events The geological history of Earth follows the major events in Earth's past based on the geologic time scale, a system of chronological measurement based on the study of the planet's rock layers (stratigraphy). Earth formed about 4.54 billion years ago by accretion from the solar nebula, a disk-shaped mass of dust and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, which also created the rest of the Solar System. As the surface continually reshaped itself over hundreds of millions of years, continents formed and broke apart.

Geology Geology gives insight into the history of the Earth by providing the primary evidence for plate tectonics, the evolutionary history of life, and past climates. In modern times, geology is commercially important for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration / exploitation as well as for evaluating water resources. It is publicly important for the prediction and understanding of natural hazards, the remediation of environmental problems, and for providing insights into past climate change. Geology also plays a role in geotechnical engineering and is a major academic discipline. Geologic time scale Online exhibits Geologic time scale Take a journey back through the history of the Earth — jump to a specific time period using the time scale below and examine ancient life, climates, and geography. You might wish to start in the Cenozoic Era (65.5 million years ago to the present) and work back through time, or start with Hadean time (4.6 to 4 billion years ago)* and journey forward to the present day — it's your choice. [Note: "mya" means "millions of years ago"]

History of the Earth The history of Earth concerns the development of the planet Earth from its formation to the present day.[1][2] Nearly all branches of natural science have contributed to the understanding of the main events of the Earth's past. The age of Earth is approximately one-third of the age of the universe. An immense amount of geological change has occurred in that timespan, accompanied by biological change. History of the Earth The history of the Earth concerns the development of the planet Earth from its formation to the present day.[1][2] Nearly all branches of natural science have contributed to the understanding of the main events of the Earth's past. The age of Earth is approximately one-third of the age of the universe. An immense amount of biological and geological change has occurred in that time span. The first life forms appeared between 3.8 and 3.5 billion years ago. The earliest evidences for life on Earth are graphite found to be biogenic in 3.7 billion-year-old metasedimentary rocks discovered in Western Greenland[3] and microbial mat fossils found in 3.48 billion-year-old sandstone discovered in Western Australia.[4][5] Photosynthetic life appeared around 2 billion years ago, enriching the atmosphere with oxygen.

Plastic particle water pollution A large portion of marine debris consists of plastic particles, including nurdles, pre-production microplastic resin pellets typically under 5 mm (0.20 in) in diameter found outside of the typical plastic manufacturing stream and an intermediate good used to produce plastic final products;[1] microbeads from cosmetics; and the breakdown products of plastic litter. Plastic particle water pollution is also referred to as mermaids' tears.[2] Approximately 60 billion pounds (27 million tonnes) of nurdles are manufactured annually in the United States.[3] One pound of pelletized HDPE contains approximately 25,000 nurdles (approximately 20 mg per nurdle).

Rock (geology) Rocks have been used by mankind throughout history. From the Stone Age rocks have been used for tools. The minerals and metals we find in rocks have been essential to human civilization.[1] Three major groups of rocks are defined: igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. The scientific study of rocks is called petrology, which is an essential component of geology. Geology Entrance You might wish to start in the Cenozoic Era (65 million years ago to the present) and work back through time, or start with Hadean time (4.5 to 3.8 billion years ago) and journey forward to the present day. No matter "when" you start, don't forget to stop along the way to learn about the stratigraphy, ancient life, fossil localities, and tectonics of the various time periods. Here are three links that can help to speed your journey: 1) Get helpful hints on navigating the Geology Wing. 2) Read about the history of the geologic time scale, and find out more about how it is organized.

Timeline of plant evolution This article attempts to place key plant innovations in a geological context. It concerns itself only with novel adaptations and events that had a major ecological significance, not those that are of solely anthropological interest. The timeline displays a graphical representation of the adaptations; the text attempts to explain the nature and robustness of the evidence. Plant evolution is an aspect of the study of biological evolution, involving predominantly evolution of plants suited to live on land, greening of various land masses by the filling of their niches with land plants, and diversification of groups of land plants. Earliest classifiable plants[edit]

History of the Earth - EvoWiki From EvoWiki Painting of a late Jurassic Scene on one of the large island in the Lower Saxony basin in northern Germany. It shows an adult and a juvenile specimen of the sauropod Europasaurus holgeri and Iguanodons passing by. There are two Compsognathus in the foreground and an Archaeopteryx at the right. According to mainstream science, the universe is approximately 13.7 billion years old. It is thought that our universe's existence can be traced back to an event in space-time known as the Big Bang.

Rock cycle Historical development[edit] The original concept of the rock cycle is usually attributed to James Hutton, from the eighteenth century Father of Geology. The rock cycle was a part of Hutton's uniformitarianism and his famous quote: no vestige of a beginning, and no prospect of an end, applied in particular to the rock cycle and the envisioned cyclical nature of geologic processes.

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