background preloader

Hunter S. Thompson

Hunter S. Thompson
Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, to a middle-class family, Thompson had a turbulent youth after the death of his father left the family in poverty. He was unable to formally finish high school as he was incarcerated for 60 days after abetting a robbery. He subsequently joined the United States Air Force before moving into journalism. He traveled frequently, including stints in California, Puerto Rico, and Brazil, before settling in Aspen, Colorado, in the early 1960s. Politically minded, Thompson ran unsuccessfully for sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado, in 1970, on the Freak Power ticket. While suffering a bout of health problems, Thompson committed suicide at the age of 67. Early life[edit] Education[edit] Interested in sports and athletically inclined from a young age, Thompson co-founded the Hawks Athletic Club while attending I. Military service[edit] Early journalism career[edit] "...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hunter_S._Thompson

Related:  Thesis - Exploration of Value

Political economy In the late 19th century, the term economics came to replace political economy, coinciding with the publication of an influential textbook by Alfred Marshall in 1890.[1] Earlier, William Stanley Jevons, a proponent of mathematical methods applied to the subject, advocated economics for brevity and with the hope of the term becoming "the recognised name of a science."[2][3] Etymology[edit] In the United States, political economy first was taught at the College of William and Mary, where in 1784, Smith's The Wealth of Nations was a required textbook.[5] Deepa Malik [Biography] Swimmer,Biker of the world ~ Matpal Deepa Malik is an Indian swimmer, biker and athlete. She is a paraplegic. She has won numerous accolades for her participation in various adventure sports. She was born on 30th Sept 1970.

Aldous Huxley Aldous Leonard Huxley /ˈhʌksli/ (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death.

Sociotechnical system Sociotechnical systems (STS) in organizational development is an approach to complex organizational work design that recognizes the interaction between people and technology in workplaces. The term also refers to the interaction between society's complex infrastructures and human behaviour. In this sense, society itself, and most of its substructures, are complex sociotechnical systems. The term sociotechnical systems was coined by Eric Trist, Ken Bamforth and Fred Emery, World War II era, based on their work with workers in English coal mines at the Tavistock Institute in London.[1]

The Last Question The last question was asked for the first time, half in jest, on May 21, 2061, at a time when humanity first stepped into the light. The question came about as a result of a five dollar bet over highballs, and it happened this way: Alexander Adell and Bertram Lupov were two of the faithful attendants of Multivac. As well as any human beings could, they knew what lay behind the cold, clicking, flashing face -- miles and miles of face -- of that giant computer. They had at least a vague notion of the general plan of relays and circuits that had long since grown past the point where any single human could possibly have a firm grasp of the whole.

India's Worst Journalists... (This post was made on August 31. Since then the media skeletons don't seem to stop tumbling out. Some of the faces here are prominently connected in various scams including the Nira Radia tapes. I thought an update to this post may not be a bad idea. Updates made on November 26 are in Red.) India's 10-Worst Journalists: In a very 'scientific' poll conducted by Mediacrooks the following were voted the worst contemporary journalists around. Anne McCaffrey Anne Inez McCaffrey (1 April 1926 – 21 November 2011)[1][2] was an American-born Irish writer, best known for the Dragonriders of Pern science fiction series. Early in McCaffrey's 46-year career as a writer, she became the first woman to win a Hugo Award for fiction and the first to win a Nebula Award. Her 1978 novel The White Dragon became one of the first science-fiction books to appear on the New York Times Best Seller list. In 2005 the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named McCaffrey its 22nd Grand Master, an annual award to living writers of fantasy and science fiction.[3][4] She was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame on 17 June 2006.[5][6][7] Life and career[edit]

Disruptive innovation Sustaining innovations are typically innovations in technology, whereas disruptive innovations cause changes to markets. For example, the automobile was a revolutionary technological innovation, but it was not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. The market for transportation essentially remained intact until the debut of the lower priced Ford Model T in 1908. The mass-produced automobile was a disruptive innovation, because it changed the transportation market.

"Nightfall" by Isaac Asimov Isaak Asimov. "Nightfall" Title: Nightfall Author: Isaak Asimov Original copyright year: 1941 Genre: science fiction Date of e-text: September 12, 1999 Prepared by: Ken If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore, and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God?' EMERSON Aton 77, director of Saro University, thrust out a belligerent lower lip and glared at the young newspaperman in a hot fury.

Where has the Ghazal gone? In 2000, Talat Aziz was singing at a ghazal concert in Mumbai when Mehdi Hassan arrived on a wheelchair. Aziz paused for his guru, the most famous ghazal singer of the time. Born to a family of musicians in the Jhunjhunu district of Rajasthan, Hassan had migrated to Pakistan after Partition. But his popularity was no less in the country of his birth. The crowd had turned away to look at Hassan. Everybody, including Aziz, requested Hassan to sing.

Charles Addams Charles Samuel "Chas" Addams[2] (January 7, 1912 – September 29, 1988) was an American cartoonist known for his darkly humorous and macabre characters. Some of the recurring characters, who became known as The Addams Family, have been the basis for spin-offs in several other media. Biography[edit] Life[edit] Charles Samuel Addams was born in Westfield, New Jersey, the son of Grace M. and Charles Huy Addams, a piano-company executive who had studied to be an architect.[3] He was known as "something of a rascal around the neighborhood" as childhood friends recalled.[4] Addams was distantly related to U.S. presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, despite the different spellings of their last names, and was a first cousin twice removed to noted social reformer Jane Addams.[4][5]

Nicholas Confessore Nicholas Confessore is a political correspondent on the National Desk of The New York Times.[1] Early life[edit] Confessore grew up in New York City and attended Hunter College High School. He was a politics major at Princeton University, class of 1998. Eyes Do More Than See Copyright © 1965 by Mercury Press, Inc. After hundreds of billions of years, he suddenly thought of himself as Ames. Not the wavelength combination which, though all the universe was now the equivalent of Ames -- but the sound itself. A faint memory came back of the sound waves he no longer heard and no longer could hear. Eadweard Muybridge In 1874 he shot and killed Major Harry Larkyns, his wife's lover, but was acquitted in a jury trial on the grounds of justifiable homicide.[3] He travelled for more than a year in Central America on a photographic expedition in 1875. In the 1880s, Muybridge entered a very productive period at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, producing over 100,000 images of animals and humans in motion, capturing what the human eye could not distinguish as separate movements. He spent much of his later years giving public lectures and demonstrations of his photography and early motion picture sequences, traveling back to England and Europe to publicise his work. He also edited and published compilations of his work, which greatly influenced visual artists and the developing fields of scientific and industrial photography. He returned to his native England permanently in 1894, and in 1904, the Kingston Museum, containing a collection of his equipment, was opened in his hometown.

Related: