background preloader

Popular culture

Elvis Presley is a well-known popular culture icon. Popular Culture is often viewed as being trivial and "dumbed down" in order to find consensual acceptance throughout the mainstream. As a result, it comes under heavy criticism from various non-mainstream sources (most notably religious groups and countercultural groups) which deem it superficial, consumerist, sensationalist, and corrupted.[2][3][4][5][6] History and definitions[edit] The term "popular culture" was coined in the 19th century or earlier.[7] Traditionally, the term has denoted the education and general "culturedness" of the lower classes,[8] as opposed to the "official culture" and higher or the education emanated by the dominant classes.[9][10] The stress in the distinction from "official culture" became more pronounced towards the end of the 19th century,[11][need quotation to verify] a usage that became established by the interbellum period.[12][need quotation to verify] Folklore[edit] In popular culture[edit] Notes[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popular_culture

Related:  Thesis - Exploration of Value4) DS3: GEM, ME and PC

Political economy In the late 19th century, the term economics came to replace political economy, coinciding with the publication of an influential textbook by Alfred Marshall in 1890.[1] Earlier, William Stanley Jevons, a proponent of mathematical methods applied to the subject, advocated economics for brevity and with the hope of the term becoming "the recognised name of a science."[2][3] Goth subculture Photography with aesthetics close to Gothic (black and white), showing a woman dressed in that style Music[edit] Main article: Gothic rock Origins and development[edit] Gothic genre[edit] Sociotechnical system Sociotechnical systems (STS) in organizational development is an approach to complex organizational work design that recognizes the interaction between people and technology in workplaces. The term also refers to the interaction between society's complex infrastructures and human behaviour. In this sense, society itself, and most of its substructures, are complex sociotechnical systems. The term sociotechnical systems was coined by Eric Trist, Ken Bamforth and Fred Emery, World War II era, based on their work with workers in English coal mines at the Tavistock Institute in London.[1] Sociotechnical systems pertains to theory regarding the social aspects of people and society and technical aspects of organizational structure and processes. Here, technical does not necessarily imply material technology.

Popular culture studies Popular culture studies is the academic discipline studying popular culture from a critical theory perspective. It is generally considered as a combination of communication studies and cultural studies. The first department to offer Popular Culture bachelor and master degrees is the Bowling Green State University Department of Popular Culture which was founded by Ray B.

Knight Some orders of knighthood, such as the Knights Templar, have become the subject of legend; others have disappeared into obscurity. Today, a number of orders of knighthood continue to exist in several countries, such as the English Order of the Garter, the Swedish Royal Order of the Seraphim, and the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav. Each of these orders has its own criteria for eligibility, but knighthood is generally granted by a head of state to selected persons to recognise some meritorious achievement. Knighthood in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century.

Disruptive innovation Sustaining innovations are typically innovations in technology, whereas disruptive innovations cause changes to markets. For example, the automobile was a revolutionary technological innovation, but it was not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. The market for transportation essentially remained intact until the debut of the lower priced Ford Model T in 1908. The mass-produced automobile was a disruptive innovation, because it changed the transportation market. The automobile, by itself, was not. The current theoretical understanding of disruptive innovation is different from what might be expected by default, an idea that Clayton M.

Punk subculture Two UK punks in the 1980s The punk subculture, which centres on punk rock music, includes a diverse array of ideologies, fashions and forms of expression, including visual art, dance, literature and film. The subculture is largely characterized by anti-establishment views and the promotion of individual freedom. Propaganda Propaganda is a form of communication aimed towards influencing the attitude of a population toward some cause or position. While the term propaganda has acquired a strongly negative connotation by association with its most manipulative and jingoistic examples, propaganda in its original sense was neutral and could refer to uses that were generally positive, such as public health recommendations, signs encouraging citizens to participate in a census or election, or messages encouraging persons to report crimes to law enforcement. Etymology[edit] From the 1790s, the term began being used also for propaganda in secular activities.[2] The term began taking a pejorative connotation in the mid-19th century, when it was used in the political sphere.[2] Types[edit]

Nicholas Confessore Nicholas Confessore is a political correspondent on the National Desk of The New York Times.[1] Early life[edit] Confessore grew up in New York City and attended Hunter College High School. He was a politics major at Princeton University, class of 1998. While at Princeton, he wrote for the weekly student newspaper, the Nassau Weekly.[2] Career[edit] Cyberculture Cyberculture or computer culture is the culture that has emerged, or is emerging, from the use of computer networks for communication, entertainment, and business. It is also the study of various social phenomena associated with the Internet and other new forms of the network communication, such as online communities, online multi-player gaming, wearable computing, social gaming, social media, mobile apps, augmented reality, and texting,[1] and includes issues related to identity, privacy, and network formation. Overview[edit]

Meme A meme (/ˈmiːm/ meem)[1] is "an idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person within a culture."[2] A meme acts as a unit for carrying cultural ideas, symbols, or practices that can be transmitted from one mind to another through writing, speech, gestures, rituals, or other imitable phenomena with a mimicked theme. Supporters of the concept regard memes as cultural analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures.[3] From “cash only” to NFC-ready, how we buy determines what we buy I live one block away from a McDonald’s that, up until this year, I never patronized. My neighborhood technically counts as a part of Seattle, but it’s just far enough away from the denser, hipper parts of town that it has room for big parking lots and giant chain stores—prime real estate for your Home Depots, your malls, your Mickey D’s. I’m not as chain-averse as many in the Northwest, but I still rarely heed the call of the golden arches. Things started to change when I upgraded my personal smartphone to an LG Nexus 5 and started fiddling with the options menus.

Climate Change Facts: Answers to Common Questions This page answers some of the most commonly asked questions about climate change and its impacts. Explore more questions using our Frequently Asked Questions Database. + Show All Responses

Related: