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Wiki: Animals

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Halobates. Halobates or sea skaters are a genus with over 40 species of water striders.

Halobates

While many are coastal, about five of these are able to survive and stand on the surface of the open ocean, a habitat containing very few insect species. They are predators, coastal species feeding mainly on fallen terrestrial insects while the oceanic species feed on plankton. The coastal species lay their eggs on rocks near the shore, the oceanic species attach their egg masses on floating objects such as cuttlebone, feathers and plastic waste.[1] Species are found around the world, commonly near the equator.[2] Most are tiny, the body length being about half a centimeter but with long legs of up to 2 centimeters. They are wingless and the abdomen is short and compressed compared to the length of the thorax. Gravid females may appear to have an elongated abdomen. Halobates - Wikipedia. Pumapard. Pumapard, c.1900 Pumapard, Rothschild Museum, Tring A pumapard is a hybrid of a puma and a leopard.

Pumapard

Both male puma with female leopard and male leopard with female puma pairings have produced offspring. In general, these hybrids have exhibited a tendency to dwarfism. Reported puma/leopard hybrids[edit] In the late 1890s/early 1900s, two hybrids were born in Chicago, USA, followed 2 years later by three sets of twin cubs born at a zoo in Hamburg, Germany from a puma father and leopard mother.

United States presidential pets. This is a list of pets belonging to United States Presidents and their families, while serving their term(s) in office.[1] History of White House dogs[edit] Richard Nixon was accused of hiding a secret slush fund during his candidacy for vice president under Dwight D.

United States presidential pets

Eisenhower in 1952. Irukandji jellyfish. Irukandji jellyfish (/ˌɪrəˈkændʒi/ IRR-ə-KAN-jee) are small and extremely venomous box jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia and which are able to fire their stingers into their victim, causing symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome.

Irukandji jellyfish

Their size is roughly a cubic centimetre (1 cm3). There are four known species of Irukandji: Carukia barnesi, Malo kingi, Alatina alata and the recently discovered Malo maximus.[1][2] The symptoms of Irukandji syndrome were first documented by Hugo Flecker in 1952.[3] They were named after the Irukandji people whose country stretches along the coastal strip north of Cairns, Queensland.[4] The first of these jellyfish, Carukia barnesi, was identified in 1964 by Jack Barnes; in order to prove it was the cause of Irukandji syndrome, he captured the tiny jelly and allowed it to sting him while his son and a lifeguard observed the effects.[5][6] Range[edit] Biology[edit]

Baculum. Baculum of a dog's penis, arrow shows the urethral sulcus.

Baculum

The baculum (also penis bone, penile bone or os penis) is a bone found in the penis of many placental mammals. It is absent in the human penis, but present in the penises of other primates, such as the gorilla and chimpanzee. The bone aids sexual intercourse by maintaining sufficient stiffness during sexual penetration. The female equivalent is the os clitoridis – a bone in the clitoris.[1][2] Etymology[edit] The phallic meaning of the term is unique to English.

Ichthyosaur. Ichthyosaurs (Greek for "fish lizard" - ιχθυς or ichthys meaning "fish" and σαυρος or sauros meaning "lizard") were large marine reptiles.

Ichthyosaur

Ichthyosaurs belong to the order known as Ichthyosauria or Ichthyopterygia ('fish flippers' - a designation introduced by Sir Richard Owen in 1840, although the term is now used more for the parent clade of the Ichthyosauria). Science became aware of the existence of ichthyosaurs, during the early nineteenth century when the first complete skeletons were found in England. In 1834, the order Ichthyosauria was named. Later that century, many excellently preserved ichthyosaur fossils were discovered in Germany, including soft tissue remains. Since the late twentieth century there has been a revived interest in the group leading to an increased number of named ichthyosaurs from all continents, over fifty valid genera being now known. Man-eater. Man-eater is a colloquial term for an animal that preys upon humans.

Man-eater

This does not include scavenging. Humanzee. The portmanteau word humanzee for a human–chimpanzee hybrid appears to have entered usage in the 1980s.[1] Feasibility[edit]

Humanzee

List of Extinct Mammals. A large number of prehistoric mammals are extinct, such as Megafauna.

List of Extinct Mammals

See List of prehistoric mammals. This is an incomplete list of historically known extinct mammals, their dates of extinction, and former range. Mammals included are organisms which have been described by science, but which have subsequently become extinct. Arthropleura. Arthropleura (Greek for Jointed Ribs) is a genus of extinct, 0.3–2.6 metre (1–8.5 feet) long arthropods related to modern day centipedes and millipedes, native to the upper Carboniferous (340 to 280 million years ago) of what is now northeastern North America and Scotland.

Arthropleura

The larger species of the genera are the largest known land invertebrates of all time, and would have had few, if any predators. Description and behavior[edit] Reconstruction of A. armata. Contrary to earlier and popular beliefs, Arthropleura was not a predator but an herbivorous arthropod. Because none of the known fossils have the mouth preserved, scientists suppose that Arthropleura did not have strongly sclerotized and powerful mouth parts, because such would have been preserved at least in some of the fossils. Donnie (dog) Donnie is a Doberman Pinscher dog who came to the attention of science due to his penchant for arranging his plush toys in geometric forms.[1] His owner rescued him from an animal shelter, and at first he was slow to learn, and very reluctant to interact socially with her.[2] He has appeared on the National Geographic Channel’s Dog Genius show.[1][3] On the show, he is shown arranging some of his 80 plush toys into evenly-spaced triangles and lines, and chooses to use, for example, only stuffed frogs or monkeys for a particular design.[4] He is shown creating his arrangements in his large yard in Maryland on remote video cameras without humans being present.

He is even said to create social vignettes with the toys.[4][5] For example, the day after he first allowed his owner to put her arm around him, he placed a large bear with its arm around a smaller frog.[2][6] Dr. Glyptodon. Evolution[edit] Restoration Glyptodon carapace fragment (Pleistocene). Glyptodon is part of the superorder of placental mammals known as Xenarthra. This clade of mammals also includes anteaters, tree sloths, armadillos, and extinct ground sloths and pampatheres. Glyptodon originated in South America. Self-awareness. Self-awareness is the capacity for introspection and the ability to recognize oneself as an individual separate from the environment and other individuals.[1] It is not to be confused with consciousness.

While consciousness is being aware of one’s environment and body and lifestyle, self-awareness is the recognition of that consciousness.[2] Velociraptor - Predatory Behavior. Smaller than other dromaeosaurids like Deinonychus and Achillobator, Velociraptor nevertheless shared many of the same anatomical features. It was a bipedal, feathered carnivore with a long tail and an enlarged sickle-shaped claw on each hindfoot, which is thought to have been used to tackle prey.

Megalonyx jeffersonii (Giant Land Sloth)