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Alain Robert. Alain Robert (born as Robert Alain Philippe on 7 August 1962), is a French rock climber and urban climber, from Digoin, Saône-et-Loire, Bourgogne, France.

Alain Robert

Known as "the French Spider-Man" (after the comic character Spider-Man), or "the Human Spider", Robert is famous for scaling skyscrapers using no climbing equipment except for a small bag of chalk and a pair of climbing shoes. Robert is managed by English player's agent Bryan Yeubrey.[1] Strategy[edit] Because authorities will not normally give him permission for such dangerous exploits, Robert usually appears at dawn on the site of whichever giant skyscraper he has chosen to climb. [citation needed] His exploits attract crowds of onlookers who stop to watch him climb. His rock-climbing physical training and technique allow him to climb using the small protrusions of building walls and windows (such as window ledges and frames). Career[edit] Alain Robert climbing the New York Times Building on 5 June 2008.

George Bernard Shaw. George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950) was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics.

George Bernard Shaw

Zeno of Citium. Life[edit] Zeno is described as a haggard, tanned person,[5] living a spare, ascetic life.[6] This coincides with the influences of Cynic teaching, and was, at least in part, continued in his Stoic philosophy.

Zeno of Citium

From the day Zeno became Crates’s pupil, he showed a strong bent for philosophy, though with too much native modesty to assimilate Cynic shamelessness. Hence Crates, desirous of curing this defect in him, gave him a potful of lentil-soup to carry through the Ceramicus; and when he saw that Zeno was ashamed and tried to keep it out of sight, with a blow of his staff, Crates broke the pot. As Zeno began to run off in embarrassment with the lentil-soup flowing down his legs, Crates chided “Why run away, my little Phoenician?” Epicurus. Epicurus (/ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs/ or /ˌɛpɪˈkjɔːrəs/;[2] Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, Epíkouros, "ally, comrade"; 341–270 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher as well as the founder of the school of philosophy called Epicureanism.

Epicurus

Only a few fragments and letters of Epicurus's 300 written works remain. Much of what is known about Epicurean philosophy derives from later followers and commentators. For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by ataraxia—peace and freedom from fear—and aponia—the absence of pain—and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends.

He taught that pleasure and pain are the measures of what is good and evil; death is the end of both body and soul and should therefore not be feared; the gods neither reward nor punish humans; the universe is infinite and eternal; and events in the world are ultimately based on the motions and interactions of atoms moving in empty space. Saint Patrick. Saint Patrick (Latin: Patricius; Proto-Irish: *Qatrikias;[2] Modern Irish: Pádraig;[needs IPA][3] Welsh: Padrig[4]) was a 5th-century Romano-British Christian missionary and bishop in Ireland.

Saint Patrick

Known as the "Apostle of Ireland", he is the primary patron saint of the island along with Saints Brigit and Columba. Bear Grylls. Edward Michael "Bear" Grylls (born 7 June 1974) is a British adventurer, writer and television presenter.

Bear Grylls

He is best known for his television series Man vs. Wild, also known originally as Born Survivor: Bear Grylls in the United Kingdom, which ended in 2011. He is also involved in a number of television series in the United Kingdom and the United States on the theme of survival in the wild. Personal life Grylls married Shara Cannings Knight in 2000.[3][9] They have three sons: Jesse, Marmaduke,[18] and Huckleberry.[5] Military service Everest On 16 May 1998, Grylls achieved his childhood dream climbed to the summit of Mount Everest, 18 months after breaking three vertebrae in a parachuting accident.[24] At 23, he was at the time among the youngest people to have achieved this feat.

Immanuel Kant. Immanuel Kant (/kænt/;[1] German: [ɪˈmaːnu̯eːl kant]; 22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is widely considered to be a central figure of modern philosophy.

Immanuel Kant

He argued that fundamental concepts structure human experience, and that reason is the source of morality. His thought continues to have a major influence in contemporary thought, especially the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics.[2] Kant's major work, the Critique of Pure Reason (Kritik der reinen Vernunft, 1781),[3] aimed to explain the relationship between reason and human experience. With this project, he hoped to move beyond what he took to be failures of traditional philosophy and metaphysics. He attempted to put an end to what he considered an era of futile and speculative theories of human experience, while resisting the skepticism of thinkers such as David Hume. Kant argued that our experiences are structured by necessary features of our minds. Luigi Galvani. Luigi Aloisio Galvani (Latin: Aloysius Galvani) (September 9, 1737 – December 4, 1798) was an Italian physician, physicist and philosopher who had also studied medicine and had practiced as a doctor, who lived and died in Bologna.

Luigi Galvani

In 1780, he discovered that the muscles of dead frogs legs twitched when struck by a spark.[1]:67-71 This was one of the first forays into the study of bioelectricity, a field that still today studies the electrical patterns and signals of the nervous system. Early life[edit] Luigi Galvani was born to Domenicoo and Barbara Foschi in Bologna, Italy. His father was a goldsmith and his mother was Domenico's fourth wife. Marcel Proust. Allen Ginsberg. Pablo Picasso. Picasso, Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp are regarded as the three artists who most defined the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the 20th century, responsible for significant developments in painting, sculpture, printmaking and ceramics.[4][5][6][7] Picasso demonstrated extraordinary artistic talent in his early years, painting in a realistic manner through his childhood and adolescence.

Pablo Picasso

During the first decade of the 20th century, his style changed as he experimented with different theories, techniques, and ideas. His work is often categorised into periods. While the names of many of his later periods are debated, the most commonly accepted periods in his work are the Blue Period (1901–1904), the Rose Period (1904–1906), the African-influenced Period (1907–1909), Analytic Cubism (1909–1912), and Synthetic Cubism (1912–1919). Emo Philips. Emo Philips is an American entertainer and comedian born in the Chicago suburb of Downers Grove.[1] Much of his standup comedy stems from the use of paraprosdokians and garden path sentences spoken in a wandering falsetto tone of voice and a confused, childlike delivery of his material to produce the intended comic timing in a manner invoking the 'wisdom of children' or the idiot savant.

Emo Philips

Career[edit] Philips has recorded three comedy albums. His album E=mo², recorded live at Caroline's in New York City, won the 1985 New Music Award for best comedy album. It was later re-released along with his Live at the Hasty Pudding Theatre album on a single CD. He also released an album called Emo in 2001. Personal life[edit] Through his formative years before taking the pseudonym under which he performed, Philips' given name was Phil Soltanek.

Isaac Asimov.