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The story of Malala Yousafzai

The story of Malala Yousafzai

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIqOhxQ0-H8

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Profile: Malala Yousafzai Image copyright Reuters It has only been five years since Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai wrote an anonymous diary about life under Taliban rule in north-west Pakistan. Since then she has been shot in the head by the militants, and has become the youngest person ever to win the Nobel Peace Prize. Accepting the award in Oslo on 10 December, she said she was "humbled" and proud to be the first Pashtun and the first Pakistani to win the prize.

New study yields instructive results on how mindset affects learning Stanford Report, February 7, 2007 When psychology Professor Carol Dweck was a sixth-grader at P.S. 153 in Brooklyn, N.Y., she experienced something that made her want to understand why some people view intelligence as a fixed trait while others embrace it as a quality that can be developed and expanded. Dweck's teacher that year, Mrs. Wilson, seated her students around the room according to their IQ. The girls and boys who didn't have the highest IQ in the class were not allowed to carry the flag during assembly or even wash the blackboard, Dweck said. "She let it be known that IQ for her was the ultimate measure of your intelligence and your character," she said.

Standing with Malala: Meet the teenagers who survived the Taliban and kept going to school On a Tuesday in October 2012, a bus carrying the students of Khushal Girls High School and College in Pakistan’s Swat Valley came to a stop. The girls inside were on their way home from a day of exams. “I was looking outside daydreaming,” recalls Shazia Ramzan, who was 14 years old at the time. “I was talking with my best friend, Sana,” says Ramzan's friend, Kainat Riaz, who was 16. Heroes: What They Do & Why We Need Them By Scott T. Allison and George R. Goethals People often ask us why we need heroes. What is PBL? Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. In Gold Standard PBL, Essential Project Design Elements include: Key Knowledge, Understanding, and Success Skills - The project is focused on student learning goals, including standards-based content and skills such as critical thinking/problem solving, collaboration, and self-management. Challenging Problem or Question - The project is framed by a meaningful problem to solve or a question to answer, at the appropriate level of challenge.

Harriet Tubman Wins Poll for Woman on $20 Bill Petitions to replace Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman were delivered to the White House Harriet Tubman won an online poll asking which woman should be featured on the $20 bill, as part of a movement to push President Obama to support the idea. More than 600,000 people voted in the online poll, and Tubman won with over 33% of the vote, beating runner-up Eleanor Roosevelt by 7,000 votes. bell hooks Urges "Radical Openness" in Teaching, Learning (The Council Chronicle, Sept. 04) When bell hooks writes about "education as the practice of freedom," she's "talking about that quality of education that is enabling and empowering and that allows us to grow." She adds, "The heart of education as a practice of freedom is to promote growth. It's very much an act of love in that sense of love as something that promotes our spiritual and mental growth." She credits education in this sense with fueling her own journey: "When people frequently ask me, 'What changed your life; what enabled you to come from this working-class, segregated home where [your] parents were not college-educated people into being one of our nation's well-known intellectuals?'

The Syrian Refugee Crisis Explained Perfectly With a Simple Animation & Video In September 2015, the body of a three-year-old Syrian boy was found floating on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. Photographs of the boy were quick to get circulated world over, and the world responded with a massive outcry over the Syrian civil war and refugee crisis. This was the first time the Syrian crisis was globally recognised as a burning issue, and one that needs to be addressed with utmost urgency. This video, by In a Nutshell , speaks about how the Syrian crisis is an international issue, and how it all started with countrywide unrest and the civil war in Syria. Apart from the succinct explanation of the overarching issue, the video also explains the role of the neighbouring countries in aiding and giving asylum to refugees in their greatest hour of need.

MLK's Selma march captured by Stephen Somerstein's lens 18 January 2015Last updated at 19:18 ET Student newspaper editor Stephen Somerstein travelled to Alabama to see Martin Luther King, Jr Some of the most memorable news imagery of the post-war years came from the struggle for black equality, when photojournalism doubled as iconography.

Why students need more than 'grit' Recently, “grit” has received growing attention from educators and others as the critical ingredient to academic success. Given our nation’s admiration for the rugged individual, it is understandable why we choose to glorify guts and grit. However, it is less clear why the idea has become such a popular explanation for success in education. University of Pennsylvania psychologist and McArthur genius awardee Angela Lee Duckworth has convincingly argued that grit is a measurable trait that predicts student achievement. She has also suggested that all students can learn to acquire grit. But an overemphasis on grit directs attention away from other factors that also affect student success.

Slavery in America - Black History The South would reach the breaking point the following year, when Republican candidate Abraham Lincoln was elected as president. Within three months, seven southern states had seceded to form the Confederate States of America; four more would follow after the Civil War (1861-65) began. Though Lincoln’s antislavery views were well established, the central Union war aim at first was not to abolish slavery, but to preserve the United States as a nation. Abolition became a war aim only later, due to military necessity, growing anti-slavery sentiment in the North and the self-emancipation of many African Americans who fled enslavement as Union troops swept through the South.

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