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Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (pronounced [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( ); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[2])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[3]—is now used worldwide. Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. Gandhi is commonly, though not officially,[10] considered the Father of the Nation[11] in India. Early life and background Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in his earliest known photo, aged 7, c. 1876 The Indian classics, especially the stories of Shravana and king Harishchandra, had a great impact on Gandhi in his childhood. English barrister Related:  Social change advocates

The Story of My Experiments with Truth The Story of My Experiments with Truth is the autobiography of Mohandas K. Gandhi, covering his life from early childhood through to 1921. It was written in weekly instalments and published in his journal Navjivan from 1925 to 1929. Its English translation also appeared in instalments in his other journal Young India.[1] It was initiated at the insistence of Swami Anand and other close co-workers of Gandhi, for him to explain the background of his public campaigns. In 1999, the book was designated as one of the "100 Best Spiritual Books of the 20th Century" by a committee of global spiritual and religious authorities.[2] Contents[edit] Translator's preface[edit] This section is written by Mahadev Desai who translated the book from Gujarati to English in 1940. 1 (1.7¢ US) and had run five editions by the time of writing this preface. 50,000 copies had been sold in Gujarati but since the English edition was expensive it prevented Indians from buying. Introduction[edit] Part I[edit]

Ride Planet Earth Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King became a civil rights activist early in his career. He led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1957, serving as its first president. With the SCLC, King led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia (the Albany Movement), and helped organize the 1963 nonviolent protests in Birmingham, Alabama that attracted national attention following television news coverage of the brutal police response. King also helped to organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. There, he established his reputation as one of the greatest orators in American history. On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee. Doctoral studies

John Ruskin John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, also an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He wrote on subjects ranging from geology to architecture, myth to ornithology, literature to education, and botany to political economy. His writing styles and literary forms were equally varied. He was hugely influential in the latter half of the 19th century, and up to the First World War. Ruskin first came to widespread attention with the first volume of Modern Painters (1843), an extended essay in defence of the work of J. Early life (1819–1846)[edit] Genealogy[edit] Ruskin was the only child of first cousins.[1] His father, John James Ruskin (1785–1864), was a sherry and wine importer[1] founding partner and de facto business manager of Ruskin, Telford and Domecq (see Allied Domecq). Childhood and education[edit] Travel[edit] First publications[edit] Oxford[edit]

Black Sea The Black Sea is a sea in Southeastern Europe. It is bounded by Europe, Anatolia and the Caucasus and is ultimately connected to the Atlantic Ocean via the Mediterranean and the Aegean Seas and various straits. The Bosphorus Strait connects it to the Sea of Marmara, and the Strait of the Dardanelles connects that sea to the Aegean Sea region of the Mediterranean. These waters separate eastern Europe and western Asia. The Black Sea is also connected to the Sea of Azov by the Strait of Kerch. Important cities along the coast include Batumi, Burgas, Constanța, Giresun, Hopa, Istanbul, Kerch, Mangalia, Năvodari, Novorossiysk, Odessa, Ordu, Poti, Rize, Samsun, Sevastopol, Sochi, Sukhumi, Trabzon, Varna, Yalta and Zonguldak. In the past, the water level has varied significantly. Extent[edit] The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Black Sea as follows:[5] On the Southwest. In the Kertch Strait. Population[edit] Name[edit] Sunset on the Black Sea at Laspi

Paulo Freire Paulo Reglus Neves Freire, Ph.D (/ˈfrɛəri/, Portuguese: [ˈpawlu ˈfɾeiɾi]; September 19, 1921 – May 2, 1997) was a Brazilian educator and philosopher who was a leading advocate of critical pedagogy. He is best known for his influential work, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, which is considered one of the foundational texts of the critical pedagogy movement.[1][2][3] Biography[edit] Freire was born September 19, 1921 to a middle class family in Recife, Brazil. Freire became familiar with poverty and hunger during the Great Depression of the 1930s. In 1931, the family moved to the less expensive city of Jaboatão dos Guararapes, and in 1933 his father died. In 1946, Freire was appointed Director of the Department of Education and Culture of the Social Service in the state of Pernambuco. In 1964, a military coup put an end to that effort. On the strength of reception of his work, Freire was offered a visiting professorship at Harvard University in 1969. In 1986, his wife Elza died.

Unto This Last "Unto This Last" is an essay on economy by John Ruskin, first published in December 1860 in the monthly journal Cornhill Magazine in four articles. Ruskin says himself that these articles were "very violently criticized", forcing the publisher to stop the publication after four months. Subscribers sent protest letters. But Ruskin countered the attack and published the four articles in a book in May 1862. The title is a quotation from the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard. I will give unto this last, even as unto thee. The "last" are the eleventh hour labourers, who are paid as if they had worked the entire day. The eleventh hour labourers, etching by Jan Luyken based on the Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard The essay begins with the following verse:[2] “Friend, I do thee no wrong. Gandhi's paraphrase[edit] Gandhi translated "Unto This Last" into Gujarati in 1908 under the title of "Sarvodaya" ("well being of all"). References[edit] External links[edit]

Travel Blog Exchange José Mujica He has been described as "the world's 'poorest' president", due to his austere lifestyle and his donation of around 90 percent of his $12,000 (£7,500) monthly salary to charities that benefit poor people and small entrepreneurs.[1][2] Early life[edit] Guerrilla leader[edit] In the early 1960s, he joined the newly formed Tupamaros movement, an armed political group inspired by the Cuban revolution.[5] He participated in the 1969 brief takeover of Pando, a town close to Montevideo, and was later convicted by a military tribunal under the government of Jorge Pacheco Areco, who had suspended certain constitutional guarantees.[6][7] Mujica was captured by the authorities on four occasions, and he was among those political prisoners who escaped Punta Carretas Prison in 1971.[8] He was eventually re-apprehended in 1972, and was shot by the police six times. Minister of Agriculture[edit] Political positions[edit] Mujica's political ideology has evolved over the years from orthodox to pragmatist.

Sermon on the Mount The Sermon on the Mount (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Sermo in monte) is a collection of sayings and teachings of Jesus, which emphasizes his moral teaching found in the Gospel of Matthew (chapters 5, 6 and 7).[1] It is the first of the Five Discourses of Matthew and takes place relatively early in the Ministry of Jesus after he has been baptized by John the Baptist and preached in Galilee. The Sermon is the longest piece of teaching from Jesus in the New Testament, and has been one of the most widely quoted elements of the Canonical Gospels.[2] It includes some of the best known teachings of Jesus, such as the Beatitudes, and the widely recited Lord's Prayer. To most believers in Jesus, the Sermon on the Mount contains the central tenets of Christian discipleship.[2] Background and setting[edit] The Sermon on the Mount is the longest piece of teaching from Jesus in the New Testament, and occupies chapters 5, 6 and 7 of the Gospel of Matthew. Components[edit]

TRANS COOKASIAN TOUR

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