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Cognitive behavioral therapy

Cognitive behavioral therapy
CBT has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including mood, anxiety, personality, eating, substance abuse, tic, and psychotic disorders. Many CBT treatment programs for specific disorders have been evaluated for efficacy; the health-care trend of evidence-based treatment, where specific treatments for symptom-based diagnoses are recommended, has favored CBT over other approaches such as psychodynamic treatments.[3] However, other researchers have questioned the validity of such claims to superiority over other treatments.[4][5] History[edit] Philosophical roots[edit] Precursors of certain fundamental aspects of CBT have been identified in various ancient philosophical traditions, particularly Stoicism.[6] For example, Aaron T. Behavior therapy roots[edit] At the same time this of Eysenck's work, B.F. The emphasis on behavioral factors constituted the "first wave" of CBT.[15] Cognitive therapy roots[edit] Behavior and Cognitive Therapies Merge[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_behavioral_therapy

Related:  mental disorders in the 20th centuryReading ListDevelopment of Cognitive Behavioral theorySecular BibleClinical Psychology

Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders The Chinese Classification of Mental Disorders (CCMD) (中国精神疾病分类方案与诊断标准), published by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry (CSP), is a clinical guide used in China for the diagnosis of mental disorders. It is currently on a third version, the CCMD-3, written in Chinese and English. It is intentionally similar in structure and categorisation to the ICD and DSM, the two most well-known diagnostic manuals, though includes some variations on their main diagnoses and around 40 culturally related diagnoses. History[edit] Hans Eysenck Hans Jürgen Eysenck (4 March 1916 – 4 September 1997) was a psychologist born in Germany, who spent his professional career in Great Britain. He is best remembered for his work on intelligence and personality, though he worked in a wide range of areas. At the time of his death, Eysenck was the living psychologist most frequently cited in science journals.[1] Life[edit]

Dialectical behavior therapy Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a therapy designed to help people change patterns of behavior that are not effective, such as self-harm, suicidal thinking and substance abuse. This approach works towards helping people increase their emotional and cognitive regulation by learning about the triggers that lead to reactive states and helping to assess which coping skills to apply in the sequence of events, thoughts, feelings and behaviors that lead to the undesired behavior. DBT assumes that people are doing the best that they can, but either are lacking the skills or are influenced by positive or negative reinforcement that interfere with one’s functioning. DBT is a modified form of cognitive-behavioral therapy that was originally [timeframe?] developed by Marsha M.

Family therapy Family therapy , also referred to as couple and family therapy , marriage and family therapy , family systems therapy , and family counseling , is a branch of psychotherapy that works with families and couples in intimate relationships to nurture change and development. It tends to view change in terms of the systems of interaction between family members. It emphasizes family relationships as an important factor in psychological health.

Psychosis Psychosis (from the Greek ψυχή psyche, "mind/soul", and -ωσις -osis, "abnormal condition or derangement") refers to an abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a "loss of contact with reality". People suffering from psychosis are described as psychotic. Psychosis (as a sign of a psychiatric disorder) is a diagnosis of exclusion. Signs and symptoms[edit]

Antidepressant Antidepressants are drugs used for the treatment of major depressive disorder and other conditions, including dysthymia, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, eating disorders, chronic pain, neuropathic pain and, in some cases, dysmenorrhoea, snoring, migraines, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), substance abuse and sleep disorders. They can be used alone or in combination with other medications. The most important classes of antidepressants are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Other drugs used or proposed for the treatment of depression include buprenorphine,[1] tryptophan,[2] low-dose antipsychotics,[3] and St John's wort.[4]

Behaviour therapy Behavior therapy is a broad term referring to either psycho-, behavior analytical, or a combination of the two therapies. In its broadest sense, the methods focus on either just behaviors or in combination with thoughts and feelings that might be causing them. Those who practice behavior therapy tend to look more at specific, learned behaviors and how the environment has an impact on those behaviors. Those who practice behavior therapy are called behaviorists.[1] They tend to look for treatment outcomes that are objectively measurable.[2] Behavior therapy does not involve one specific method but it has a wide range of techniques that can be used to treat a person’s psychological problems.[3] Behavior therapy breaks down into three disciplines: applied behavior analysis (ABA), cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), and social learning theory. History[edit]

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