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Solve Puzzles for Science

Solve Puzzles for Science
Hey everyone! I will be leading a Science Café about Foldit at the Southpaw Social Club, in San Diego, on April 28. The purpose of the event is to engage with the community in a casual, comfortable setting to talk about the exciting science of protein folding and the Foldit computer game. There will be a short presentation on the science behind Foldit, but the event is mostly dedicated to Q & A and open discussion with the audience. We're very excited about this opportunity to share Foldit in such a personable format! This is also a great chance for any Foldit players in the San Diego area to come together and talk to a member of the Foldit team.

http://fold.it/portal/

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Pacific Sea Level Monitoring Project The Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM), operates under the Climate and Oceans Support Program in the Pacific (COSPPac). It is a continuation of the 20-year South Pacific Sea Level and Climate Monitoring Project (SPSLCMP) The 14 Pacific Island countries participating in the project are the Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. The primary goal of the project is to generate an accurate record of variance in long-term sea level for the Pacific region. The project also provides information about the processes, scale and implications of sea-level rise and variability of extreme events on South Pacific communities.

The Science Behind Foldit Foldit is a revolutionary new computer game enabling you to contribute to important scientific research. This page describes the science behind Foldit and how your playing can help. What is a protein? Mariette DiChristina: "Science Is an Engine of Human Prosperity" On Thursday, July 17, four science experts served as witnesses at the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing, “The Federal Research Portfolio: Capitalizing on Investments in R&D.” The hearing considered the federal government’s role in research and development (R&D), and the nation’s STEM education and outreach initiatives.

Foldit Foldit is an online puzzle video game about protein folding. The game is part of an experimental research project, and is developed by the University of Washington's Center for Game Science in collaboration with the UW Department of Biochemistry. The objective of the game is to fold the structure of selected proteins as well as possible, using various tools provided within the game. The highest scoring solutions are analysed by researchers, who determine whether or not there is a native structural configuration (or native state) that can be applied to the relevant proteins, in the "real world".

Crowdsourcing and Collective Intelligence Around crowdsourcing, a number of related terms exist but none of them can be uniquely identified with it. Such are Open Innovation, Collective Intelligence, Co-creation or User Innovation. These terms are used in different ways by different authors: some of them use these terms as opposite while others treat them as synonyms of crowdsourcing. Nanotubes and Buckyballs Home > Introduction > Nanotubes and Buckyballs Last Updated: Tuesday, 29-May-2012 06:53:42 PDT Go directly to Websites Nanotube: "Conceptually, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be considered to be formed by the rolling of a single layer of graphite (called a graphene layer) into a seamless cylinder. Gamers succeed where scientists fail Public release date: 18-Sep-2011 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Leila Grayleilag@u.washington.edu 206-685-0381University of Washington Gamers have solved the structure of a retrovirus enzyme whose configuration had stumped scientists for more than a decade. The gamers achieved their discovery by playing Foldit, an online game that allows players to collaborate and compete in predicting the structure of protein molecules.

Imagine If Every School Played *This* Video Before Class Wisdom comes with age, huh? Don't try telling that to Kid President. The kid's on fire in this insightful and funny pep talk that we can all most definitely take something from. Help Scientists Record One Day of Sound on Earth The Soundscape Recorder app in action. Image: Brandon Keim Bryan Pijanowski wants to capture the sounds of the world on a single day, and he needs your help. On Earth Day, April 22, Pijanowski hopes to enlist thousands of people in recording a few minutes of their everyday surroundings with his Soundscape Recorder smartphone app. All those sonic snippets could create an unprecedented soundtrack to life on Earth — and as they accumulate, year after year, scientists could use them to measure patterns and changes in our sonic environments.

Puzzle Installation & Collaborative Project - Tim Kelly, artist The Puzzle Art Installation & Collaborative Project is a growing and traveling group art exhibition. You don't have to be an artist to participate, you just have to have something to say. People of all ages have contributed their individual voice collectively with others to form this historic and massive art project. Milgram's Obedience Experiments By Kendra Cherry Updated December 16, 2015. If a person in a position of authority ordered you to deliver a 400-volt electrical shock to another person, would you follow orders? Most people would answer this question with an adamant no, but Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a series of obedience experiments during the 1960s that led to some surprising results. These experiments offer a compelling and disturbing look at the power of authority and obedience.

Gamers beat algorithms at finding protein structures Today's issue of Nature contains a paper with a rather unusual author list. Read past the standard collection of academics, and the final author credited is... an online gaming community. Scientists have turned to games for a variety of reasons, having studied virtual epidemics and tracked online communities and behavior, or simply used games to drum up excitement for the science. But this may be the first time that the gamers played an active role in producing the results, having solved problems in protein structure through the Foldit game. According to a news feature on Foldit, the project arose from an earlier distributed computing effort called Rosetta@home. That project used what has become the standard approach for home-based scientific work: a screensaver that provided a graphical frontend to a program that uses spare processor time to solve weighty scientific problems.

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