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Vril

Vril
Vril, the Power of the Coming Race is an 1871 novel by Edward Bulwer-Lytton, originally printed as The Coming Race. Among its readers have been those who have believed that its account of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" is accurate, to the extent that some theosophists, notably Helena Blavatsky, William Scott-Elliot, and Rudolf Steiner, accepted the book as being (at least in part) based on occult truth.[1] A popular book, The Morning of the Magicians (1960) suggested that a secret Vril Society existed in pre-Nazi Berlin. However, there is no historical evidence for the existence of such a society. History[edit] Plot summary[edit] The novel centres on a young, independently wealthy traveller (the narrator), who accidentally finds his way into a subterranean world occupied by beings who seem to resemble angels and call themselves Vril-ya. Vril in the novel[edit] Literary significance and reception[edit] Stage adaptation[edit] Vril society[edit] [edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vril

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Secret Patches from The Black OPPs world The Dragon is in your Base Killing your Dudes You’re an imagery analyst, so naturally you see yourself as a Tolkein-esque flying serpent, dispensing destruction from the heavens. That’s the apparent animating impulse behind what Paglen can only call the Unknown Dragon Patch. Dragons typically stand in for signals-intelligence satellite launches; their wing patterns on patches “symbolize the massive gold-foil dish antennae” of SIGINT spacecraft. A Voyage to Arcturus A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay , first published in 1920 . It combines fantasy , philosophy , and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence . It has been described by critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century", [ 1 ] and was a central influence on C. S. Lewis 's Space Trilogy . [ 2 ] Also J.

Bovril Bovril in a 250 gram jar Bovril is the trademarked name of a thick, salty meat extract, developed in the 1870s by John Lawson Johnston and sold in a distinctive, bulbous jar. It is made in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire, owned and distributed by Unilever UK. Bovril can be made into a drink by diluting with hot water, or less commonly with milk.[1] It can also be used as a flavouring for soups, stews or porridge, or spread on bread, especially toast, rather like Marmite. Hopi Prophecy Blue Star Kachina is Comet Holmes? - 2012 Galactic Alignment Comet Holmes as Hopi Blue Star Prophecy Fulfilled The Hopi elders have long passed down their myths and prophecies such as the Hopi Blue Star, from generation to generation via oral tradition. Additional details are extrapolated from their many ancient rock pictographs and tablets. One such prophecy reveals: "When the Blue Star Kachina makes its appearance in the heavens, the Fifth World will emerge".

The Nine Unknown Novel[edit] In the novel the nine men are embodiment of good and face up against nine Kali worshippers, who sow confusion and masquerade as the true sages. The story surrounds a priest called Father Cyprian who is in possession of the books but who wants to destroy them out of Christian piety, and a number of other characters who are interested in learning their contents. The Ralph Nader Library Site Map Ralph Nader is the inspiration for, and not the creator of, this digital archive of public-benefit oriented media material. He was not consulted, asked for permission, or addressed as a source of guidance in the creation of this project, and for all we know, his publishing people don't like it. Though we would like it if they did, and sent us lots of archive material to share with the world. Because the story of Ralph's courageous and effective campaigns on behalf of public health, environmental safety, and consumer protection can stir the commitment of people at any stage in life.

Niels Klim's Underground Travels "Citizen of Martinia with a wig" Illustration from the 1741 first edition. Niels Klim's Underground Travels , originally published in Latin as Nicolai Klimii Iter Subterraneum (1741), is a satirical science-fiction/fantasy novel written by the Norwegian–Danish author Ludvig Holberg . His only novel, it describes a utopian society from an outsider's point of view, and often pokes fun at diverse cultural and social topics such as morality, science, sexual equality, religion, governments, and philosophy. [ edit ] Plot summary The novel starts with a foreword that assures that everything in the story is a real account of the title character's exploits in the Underworld. The story is set, according to the book, in the Norwegian harbor town of Bergen in 1664, after Klim returns from Copenhagen , where he has studied philosophy and theology at the University of Copenhagen and graduated magna cum laude .

Thule Society The Thule Society (/ˈθjuːliː/; German: Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum ("Study Group for Germanic Antiquity"), was a German occultist and völkisch group in Munich, named after a mythical northern country from Greek legend. The Society is notable chiefly as the organization that sponsored the Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (DAP), which was later reorganized by Adolf Hitler into the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP or Nazi Party). Origins[edit]

Comet Holmes Discovery[edit] The comet's discovery was confirmed by Edward Walter Maunder (Royal Observatory, Greenwich, England), William Henry Maw (England), and Kidd (Bramley[disambiguation needed], England) and independent discoveries were made by Thomas David Anderson (Edinburgh, Scotland) on November 8 and by Mike Brown (Wilkes, USA) and by John Ewen Davidson (Mackay, Queensland, Australia) on November 9.[5] The first calculations of the elliptical orbits of 17P/Holmes were done independently by Heinrich Kreutz and George Mary Searle. Additional orbits eventually established the perihelion date as June 13 and the orbital period as 6.9 years.

Vril Vril, the Power of the Coming Race is an 1871 novel by Edward Bulwer-Lytton, originally printed as The Coming Race. Among its readers have been those who have believed that its account of a superior subterranean master race and the energy-form called "Vril" is accurate, to the extent that some theosophists, notably Helena Blavatsky, William Scott-Elliot, and Rudolf Steiner, accepted the book as being (at least in part) based on occult truth.[1] A popular book, The Morning of the Magicians (1960) suggested that a secret Vril Society existed in pre-Nazi Berlin. However, there is no historical evidence for the existence of such a society. History[edit] Plot summary[edit] The novel centres on a young, independently wealthy traveller (the narrator), who accidentally finds his way into a subterranean world occupied by beings who seem to resemble angels and call themselves Vril-ya.

LUCIFERIAN SYMBOLISM LUCIFERIAN (SATANIC) SYMBOLISM Satanism Reptilians The Reign of Evil Lucifer 'Signs and symbols rule the world, not words nor laws.' ~ Confucius [These are the symbols used by the Reptilian proxy group, the Reptoids (Illuminati, & Freemasons), collectively are known as Satanists or Luciferians. The Quest For The Metal Library The Quest For The Metal Library A system of tunnels and caves beneath Ecuador and Peru is reputed to hold an ancient treasure-house of artefacts including two libraries, one containing inscribed metal books and the other storing tablets of crystal. Philip Coppens It's not what you know, but who you know. In 1973, Erich von Däniken, at the height of his fame following the success of Chariots of the Gods?, claimed that he had entered into a gigantic subterranean tunnel system in Ecuador, which he was told spanned the length of the continent—surely evidence that our ancestors were highly advanced, if not extraterrestrial?

Nazism and occultism The origins of Nazism and its relation to the occult has been a part of popular culture since at least 1959. There are documentaries and books on the topic, including The Morning of the Magicians (1960) and The Spear of Destiny (1972). Historian Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke analyzed the topic in The Occult Roots of Nazism in which he argued cautiously for some real links between some ideals of Ariosophy and Nazi ideology. He also analyzed the problems of the numerous popular "occult historiography" books written on the topic. He sought to separate empiricism and sociology from the "Modern Mythology of Nazi Occultism" that exist in many books which "have represented the Nazi phenomenon as the product of arcane and demonic influence".

Spaceship Moon Theory The Spaceship Moon Theory, also known as the Vasin-Shcherbakov Theory, is a hypothesis that claims the Earth's moon may actually be an alien spacecraft. The hypothesis was put forth by two members of the then Soviet Academy of Sciences, Michael Vasin and Alexander Shcherbakov, in a July 1970 article entitled "Is the Moon the Creation of Alien Intelligence?".[1] Vasin and Shcherbakov's thesis was that the Moon is a hollowed-out planetoid created by unknown beings with technology far superior to any on Earth. Huge machines would have been used to melt rock and form large cavities within the Moon, with the resulting molten lava spewing out onto the Moon's surface.

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