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Buckminster Fuller

Buckminster Fuller
Richard Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (/ˈfʊlər/; July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor, and futurist. Buckminster Fuller was the second president of Mensa from 1974 to 1983.[2] Biography[edit] Years later, he decided that this sort of experience had provided him with not only an interest in design, but also a habit of being familiar with and knowledgeable about the materials that his later projects would require. Fuller earned a machinist's certification, and knew how to use the press brake, stretch press, and other tools and equipment used in the sheet metal trade.[3] Education[edit] Wartime experience[edit] Between his sessions at Harvard, Fuller worked in Canada as a mechanic in a textile mill, and later as a laborer in the meat-packing industry. Depression and epiphany[edit] Buckminster Fuller recalled 1927 as a pivotal year of his life. In 1927 Fuller, then aged 32, lost his job as president of Stockade. Recovery[edit] Related:  20 siècle80/20 CollectiveGeneral Science

******** Ludwig Mies van der Rohe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Waterfox Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies; March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German-American architect.[1] He is commonly referred to and was addressed as Mies, his surname. Along with Le Corbusier, Alvar Aalto, and Frank Lloyd Wright, he is widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modern architecture. Mies, like many of his post-World War I contemporaries, sought to establish a new architectural style that could represent modern times just as Classical and Gothic did for their own eras. He created an influential twentieth-century architectural style, stated with extreme clarity and simplicity. His mature buildings made use of modern materials such as industrial steel and plate glass to define interior spaces. Early career[edit] Mies was born in Aachen, Germany. His talent was quickly recognized and he soon began independent commissions, despite his lack of a formal college-level education. Personal[edit] Traditionalism to Modernism[edit] American work[edit]

Marcel Duchamp Henri-Robert-Marcel Duchamp (French: [maʁsɛl dyʃɑ̃]; 28 July 1887 – 2 October 1968) was a French, naturalized American painter, sculptor, chess player and writer whose work is associated with Cubism, conceptual art and Dada,[1][2][3] although he was careful about his use of the term Dada[4] and was not directly associated with Dada groups. Duchamp is commonly regarded, along with Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse, as one of the three artists who helped to define the revolutionary developments in the plastic arts in the opening decades of the twentieth century, responsible for significant developments in painting and sculpture.[5][6][7][8] Duchamp has had an immense impact on twentieth-century and twenty first-century art. By World War I, he had rejected the work of many of his fellow artists (like Henri Matisse) as "retinal" art, intended only to please the eye. Instead, Duchamp wanted to put art back in the service of the mind.[9] Early life and education[edit] Early work[edit] Dada[edit]

Self-reference Self-reference is studied and has applications in mathematics, philosophy, computer programming, and linguistics. Self-referential statements are sometimes paradoxical. Usage[edit] An example of a self-referential situation is the one of self-creation, as the logical organization produces itself the physical structure which creates itself. Self-reference also occurs in literature and film when an author refers to his work in the context of the work itself. The surrealist painter René Magritte is famous for his self-referential works. Examples[edit] In language[edit] A word that describes itself is called an autological word (or autonym). A sentence which inventories its own letters and punctuation marks is called an autogram. There is a special case of meta-sentence in which the content of the sentence in the metalanguage and the content of the sentence in the object language are the same. In mathematics[edit] In literature, film, and popular culture[edit] Literature See also[edit] Notes

CARBON7 « rememberwhoweare Amazing! Metatron’s Cube: NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted the signature of flat carbon flakes, called graphene, in space. If confirmed, this would be the first-ever cosmic detection of the material — which is arranged like chicken wire in flat sheets that are one atom thick. Graphene was first synthesized in a lab in 2004, and subsequent research on its unique properties garnered the Nobel Prize in 2010. Graphene in space isn’t going to result in any super-fast computers, but researchers are interested in learning more about how it is created. Spitzer identified signs of the graphene in two small galaxies outside of our own, called the Magellanic Clouds, specifically in the material shed by dying stars, called planetary nebulae. C70 and graphene belong to the fullerene family, which includes molecules called “buckyballs,” or C60. Spitzer definitively detected both buckyballs and C70 in space for the first time in July 2010 (see

Ephemeralization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Waterfox Ephemeralization, a term coined by R. Buckminster Fuller, is the ability of technological advancement to do "more and more with less and less until eventually you can do everything with nothing".[1] Fuller's vision was that ephemeralization will result in ever-increasing standards of living for an ever-growing population despite finite resources. The concept has been embraced by those who argue against Malthusian philosophy.[1] Fuller uses Henry Ford's assembly line as an example of how ephemeralization can continuously lead to better products at lower cost with no upper bound on productivity. Length measurement technologies in human development, for example, started with a compressive measure, such as a ruler. Consequences to society[edit] Francis Heylighen[2] and Alvin Toffler[3] have written that ephemeralization, though it may increase our power to solve physical problems, can make non-physical problems worse. See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

Banksy Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4] Banksy displays his art on publicly visible surfaces such as walls and self-built physical prop pieces. Personal life and disputed identity He does all this and he stays anonymous. Brad Pitt[14] In 1994, Banksy checked into a New York hotel using the name "Robin",[22] and in June 2017, DJ Goldie referred to Banksy as "Rob".[23] Career Early career (1990–2001) Banksy[45] Dismaland

Ibis The ibises (collective plural ibis;[1] classical plurals ibides[2][3] and ibes[3]) are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae. They all have long, down-curved bills, and usually feed as a group, probing mud for food items, usually crustaceans. Most species nest in trees, often with spoonbills or herons. The word ibis comes from Latin ibis[4] from Greek ἴβις ibis from Egyptian hb, hīb.[5] Species in taxonomic order[edit] There are 28 extant species and 2 extinct species of ibis. An extinct species, the Jamaican ibis or clubbed-wing ibis (Xenicibis xympithecus) was uniquely characterized by its club-like wings. In culture[edit] The African sacred ibis was an object of religious veneration in ancient Egypt, particularly associated with the deity Djehuty or otherwise commonly referred to in Greek as Thoth. The mascot of the University of Miami is an American white ibis. According to biblical tradition, Moses used the ibis to help him defeat the Ethiopians.[11]

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