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Infographic - The Emergence of Collective Intelligence

Collective Intelligence (CI) is complex by nature. It is not merely the sum of what a group knows, but the intelligence that emerges from it. This “emergent” behavior is of a different nature and we can see it at play in perfectly balanced ecosystems where swarm-like behavior produces astounding results that exceed the intelligence of any one creature acting alone.

http://www.ledcrowd.com/blog/2011/06/the-emergence-of-collective-intelligence/

Related:  The SingularityCollective Intelligence

Emerging Memetic Singularity in the Global Knowledge Society 30 April 2009 | Draft IntroductionChecklist of constraintsVarieties of singularity -- Technological singularity | Cognitive singularity | Metasystem transition -- Communication singularity | Globality as singularity | Symmetry group singularity -- Subjective singularity | Spiritual singularity | Singularity of planetary consciousness -- Metaphorical singularityEnd times scenarios -- End of history | 2012 | Timewave theory | Eschatological scenarios | End of science -- End of culture | End of religion | End of civilization | End of security | End of privacy -- End of intelligence | End of ignorance | End of knowing | End of abundance | End of confidence -- End of hope | End of truth | End of faith | End of logic | End of rationality | End of modernism -- End of wisdom | End of tolerance | End of natureBlack holes and Event horizonsConclusion Introduction Historically these were a preoccupation of the Union of Intelligible Associations and are now a focus of Global Sensemaking.

Collective Action Toolkit Is it possible to inspire design thinking outside of the design world? The practice has helped countless organizations innovate new products and services, but has infrequently been made available to a broad audience. frog set out to prove the practice is universal by creating the Collective Action Toolkit, a set of resources and activities to help people accomplish tangible outcomes through a set of guided, non-linear collaboration activities. The goal: to help communities generate solutions, connect to resources, and pool knowledge to solve a wide range of challenges and create real change. CAT got its start with the Nike Foundation, in which frog was asked to help empower girls to solve local community problems. The frog team explored the value of connections for adolescent girls living in extreme poverty in the developing world, and collectively devised solutions to the problems they faced.

Technological Singularity The technological singularity is the hypothesis that accelerating progress in technologies will cause a runaway effect wherein artificial intelligence will exceed human intellectual capacity and control, thus radically changing civilization in an event called the singularity.[1] Because the capabilities of such an intelligence may be impossible for a human to comprehend, the technological singularity is an occurrence beyond which events may become unpredictable, unfavorable, or even unfathomable.[2] The first use of the term "singularity" in this context was by mathematician John von Neumann. Proponents of the singularity typically postulate an "intelligence explosion",[5][6] where superintelligences design successive generations of increasingly powerful minds, that might occur very quickly and might not stop until the agent's cognitive abilities greatly surpass that of any human. Basic concepts

The Emergence of Collective Intelligence ~Aristotle When we observe large schools of fish swimming, we might wonder who is choreographing that complex and sophisticated dance, in which thousands of individuals move in harmony as if they knew exactly what to do to produce the collective spectacle. So, what is “Emergence”? School of fishes dancing is an example of “emergence”, a process where new properties, behaviors, or complex patterns results of relatively simple rules and interactions.

MIT Unravels the Secrets Behind Collective Intelligence – Hint: IQ Not So Important What makes a group able to succeed at large number of different tasks? Women, sharing, and sensitivity. When it comes to a successful group, the easiest way to ensure victory may be placing women on the team. MIT’s Center for Collective Intelligence seeks to understand how humans get better (or worse) at solving problems as they work together. Moore's law Moore's law is the observation that, over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles approximately every two years. The law is named after Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore, who described the trend in his 1965 paper.[1][2][3] His prediction has proven to be accurate, in part because the law is now used in the semiconductor industry to guide long-term planning and to set targets for research and development.[4] The capabilities of many digital electronic devices are strongly linked to Moore's law: processing speed, memory capacity, sensors and even the number and size of pixels in digital cameras.[5] All of these are improving at roughly exponential rates as well. This exponential improvement has dramatically enhanced the impact of digital electronics in nearly every segment of the world economy.[6] Moore's law describes a driving force of technological and social change in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.[7][8] History[edit]

Chaos theory A double rod pendulum animation showing chaotic behavior. Starting the pendulum from a slightly different initial condition would result in a completely different trajectory. The double rod pendulum is one of the simplest dynamical systems that has chaotic solutions. Chaos: When the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future.

How to Make Better Decisions Together Learning how to make decisions together is a crucial element of getting along and getting things done with others. It’s wise for your group to learn how to steer your boat together with collective decision-making before you have a sinking ship on your hands. I’ve learned these skills through workshops, readings and from living and working in cooperatives and they have been incredibly valuable to the success of these projects. Collective decision-making has innumerable rewards.

Covering technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings in fundamental ways. Michelle Ewens March 24, 2011 The concept of utility fog – flying, intercommunicating nanomachines that dynamically shape themselves into assorted configurations to serve various roles and execute multifarious tasks – was introduced by nanotech pioneer J. Storrs Hall in 1993. Recently in H+ Magazine, Hall pointed out that swarm robots are the closest thing we have to utility fog.

Chinese Thinking and Complexity By Greg Fisher Last week I attended an excellent conference in Singapore, which had the intriguing title of “A Crude Look at the Whole”. The title was attributable to Murray Gell-Man who was one of the founding fathers of the Santa Fe Institute and also the winner of the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physics. Gell-Man is famous for a few things, including being the first to postulate the existence of quarks.

Artificial Intelligence - Volume 1: Chatbot NetLogo Model Produced for the book series "Artificial Intelligence"; Author: W. J. Teahan; Publisher: Ventus Publishing Aps, Denmark. powered by NetLogo view/download model file: Chatbot.nlogo Keen On… David Weinberger: Too Big To Know (TCTV) David Weinberger, the co-author of the iconic Cluetrain Manifesto, has just released another stunningly profound book. In Too Big To Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room, Weinberger – who is a Senior Researcher at Harvard’s illustrious Berkman Center for the Internet and Society – argues that we are now experiencing a fundamental shift in the nature of knowledge that we haven’t seen for 2500 years. Acclaimed by everyone from John Seely Brown to Clay Shirky to Mark Benioff, Too Big To Know may turn out to be the Cluetrain Manifesto of 2012 – a book that, once and for all, changes the way we think about the digital revolution.

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