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Citizen Science

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Die Herbonauten. The Serendipitous Discovery of Susan Fereday: A Story about the Impact of Citizen Science. By Siobhan Leachman BHL Citizen Scientist (Learn more) Twitter: @SiobhanLeachman I love volunteering for the Biodiversity Heritage Library.

The Serendipitous Discovery of Susan Fereday: A Story about the Impact of Citizen Science

I taxo tag images in the BHL Flickr account. This assists the use of these images by BHL as well as other institutions that use BHL content. It is also my favorite way of exploring BHL. I get a real thrill out of the serendipitous discoveries I make while tagging. The Serendipitous Discovery of Susan Fereday: A Story about the Impact of Citizen Science. CrowdCurio: an online crowdsourcing platform to facilitate climate change studies using herbarium specimens - Willis - 2017 - New Phytologist. Big seaweed search guide. CrowdCurio: an online crowdsourcing platform to facilitate climate change studies using herbarium specimens - Willis - 2017 - New Phytologist. Smithsonian Digital Volunteers. CrowdCurio: an online crowdsourcing platform to facilitate climate change studies using herbarium specimens - Willis - 2017 - New Phytologist.

USA NPN Botany Primer. Home. Crowdsourced transcription. Article Citation: Lesley Parilla and Meghan Ferriter (2016) Social Media and Crowdsourced Transcription of Historical Materials at the Smithsonian Institution: Methods for Strengthening Community Engagement and Its Tie to Transcription Output.

Crowdsourced transcription

The American Archivist: Fall/Winter 2016, Vol. 79, No. 2, pp. 438-460. Lesley Parilla and Meghan Ferriter. Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 212:4, December 2016. Go down to the woods today, and it won’t just be trees that you see, but a woody world inhabited by a diverse range of organisms, including insect herbivores, pollinators, epiphytes, mycorrhizal fungi and fungal pathogens.

Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 212:4, December 2016

These organisms make themselves known in different ways. One that gardeners and orchardists will be grudgingly familiar with is apple canker, the fungal infection that causes areas of dead, sunken bark. While the symptoms of the disease are familiar, the fungus responsible has a hidden beauty that is unknown to most people. The cover of New Phytologist 212:4 (December 2016) features a photograph of the bright red, spherical fruiting bodies of the fungus Neonectria ditissima (Hypocreales), the causal agent of apple canker. Home. BIOSPEX—A Crowdsourcing Management System. The BIOSPEX Management System—Provision, Advertise, and Lead Crowdsourcing Projects Over the past few centuries, professional and citizen scientists have amassed an estimated 3 billion biological specimens for research.

BIOSPEX—A Crowdsourcing Management System

Labels and notebooks associated with these specimens offer a rich source of information on past and present patterns of biodiversity—for example, what was where at particular times in the past and the life stage the organism had reached by particular points in the year. These specimens offer a nascent source of "big data" that has yet to reach its potential because the data is largely stuck in the cabinets.

Projects

Portals. Results. Phenology and Citizen Science. People power: how citizen science could change historical research. Citizen science is a digital method, which has been applied to a range of big-data scientific problems.

People power: how citizen science could change historical research

The Zooniverse is a key player in this; having first sought the help of the crowd in classifying galaxies almost a decade ago, it now boasts 47 different projects with well over a million users. The projects hosted on their site have been bringing to the forefront concerns over who exactly is allowed to participate in science. Even though the hierarchical structure of professional science still remains within most citizen science platforms (with the exception of the extreme citizen science movement), they have had the result of giving everyone access to the raw data of research, and an opportunity to demonstrate and develop expertise. The methods of citizen science are now starting to be used for humanities projects. Citizen Science Takes Root » American Scientist. Building on a long tradition, amateur naturalists are gathering data for understanding both seasonal events and the effects of climate change.

Citizen Science Takes Root » American Scientist

Kayri Havens, Sandra Henderson In the mid-1800s, Henry David Thoreau sojourned outside Concord, Massachusetts, immersing himself in the world around him. He planted beans, entertained visitors, repaired to his mother’s house in Concord for hearty meals, and wrote Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Less widely read are the copious observations and measurements he made around the same time, between 1851 and 1858, of plants and animals at Walden Pond. New Study Finds Citizen Scientists Can Be Very Accurate. 24 4ShareNew Between 2010 and 2013, the website Snapshot Serengeti presented citizen scientists with the opportunity to help organize more than 1.2 million images (including some hilarious animal selfies) captured by a camera trap in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

New Study Finds Citizen Scientists Can Be Very Accurate

These volunteers helped identify which images in the dataset contained animals and classified the species pictured, the number of animals, and any behaviors on display. The Impact of Coordinated Social Media Campaigns on Online Citizen Science Engagement. People power: how citizen science could change historical research. About - Plants Map. Pl@ntNet - Mobile. Your place to share nature. The Facebook of plant science. By building PhotosynQ – a handheld device with sensors and an online data-sharing and analysis platform – a team of Michigan State University researchers is creating the plant-science equivalent of Facebook.

The Facebook of plant science

Following the trail blazed by successful social media networks, the team is giving away patentable devices at a nominal fee, building an active global community of plant science enthusiasts and sharing all data collected from around the world. The goal is to allow even citizen scientists to make research-quality measurements, said David Kramer, MSU Hannah Distinguished Professor in Photosynthesis and Bioenergetics. “We’ve built a platform that everyone can access through their cell phones,” he said. “We want to create a community that sees a 12-year-old student in China ask a question about a drought-resistant plant.

One component of PhotosynQ is a handheld device that costs about $100, scans plants and collects a handful of key data points. “Anyone Know What Species This Is?” – Twitter Conversations as Embryonic Citizen Science Communities. Abstract Social media like blogs, micro-blogs or social networks are increasingly being investigated and employed to detect and predict trends for not only social and physical phenomena, but also to capture environmental information.

“Anyone Know What Species This Is?” – Twitter Conversations as Embryonic Citizen Science Communities

Here we argue that opportunistic biodiversity observations published through Twitter represent one promising and until now unexplored example of such data mining. As we elaborate, it can contribute to real-time information to traditional ecological monitoring programmes including those sourced via citizen science activities. Using Twitter data collected for a generic assessment of social media data in ecological monitoring we investigated a sample of what we denote biodiversity observations with species determination requests (N = 191). These entail images posted as messages on the micro-blog service Twitter.

Citation: Daume S, Galaz V (2016) “Anyone Know What Species This Is?” Guest post 'Tips for digital participation, engagement and crowdsourcing in museums' for London Museums Group - mia ridge. I was asked to share some of the lessons I’ve learnt from building digital participation projects in museums and from my research on crowdsourcing in cultural heritage for the London Museums Group blog following my talk at their “Museums and Social Media” event on 24 May at Tate Britain.

Guest post 'Tips for digital participation, engagement and crowdsourcing in museums' for London Museums Group - mia ridge

They were published at ‘Tips for digital participation, engagement and crowdsourcing in museums by Mia Ridge‘, but as the site doesn’t seem to be loading I’ve re-posted it below. I think most of what I wrote then holds up, but today I’d add a third bonus tip – plan to ingest the results of your crowdsourcing tasks into whatever internal systems are necessary to appropriately integrate and re-share the enhanced or new data. Introduction Digital technologies have created exciting new possibilities for museum audiences to engage more widely and more deeply with cultural heritage content and collections. ASPB Partner, Wiki Edu, offers new handbook for writing species articles. The species guide is a great resource for current and future courses recruited through our American Society of Plant Biology partnership. These guides were drafted with help from various WikiProjects, experienced editors, and instructors, as well as our Wikipedia Content Expert in the Sciences, Ian Ramjohn.

The species brochure was a wonderful collaborative effort with various WikiProjects and experienced Wikipedians SchreiberBike, Shyamal, Plantdrew, MontanaBW, ClemRutter, and Parkywiki. Special thanks to Dr. British Museum uses Google Street View technology to put thousands of objects online and curate Museum of the World. The world will be able to tour the British Museum online thanks to a new alliance between curators and Google© British Museum Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum, says a new Street View tour allowing access to the museum’s permanent gallery and more than 4,500 objects represents a modern version of the age of Enlightenment during which the museum was founded in 1753. The Admonitions Scroll dates from the 6th century© British Museum One of the most important Chinese scrolls in the British Museum’s collection – the 6th century Admonitions Scroll, which is usually only visible for a few months each year due to their fragility – has been vividly rendered for a global audience as part of the partnership with the Google Cultural Institute.

What Makes a Citizen Science Project Successful? BHL supports a variety of crowdsourcing, or citizen science, initiatives that allow our community to help enhance our data, making it easier for scientists, researchers, educators, students, and others around the world to discover BHL content and use it to support scientific, conservation, and historical research. These initiatives include Flickr image tagging, transcription, image description via Science Gossip, and games that help improve our OCR. But what motivates a citizen scientist to volunteer their time on a crowdsourcing project? Open Science and Innovation: Of the People, By the People, For the People. Only a small fraction of Americans are formally trained as “scientists.” But that doesn’t mean that only a small fraction of Americans can participate in scientific discovery and innovation.

Citizen science and crowdsourcing are approaches that educate, engage, and empower the public to apply their curiosity and talents to a wide range of real-world problems. To raise awareness of these tools and encourage more Americans to take advantage of them, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Domestic Policy Council will host “Open Science and Innovation: Of the People, By the People, For the People,” a live-webcast forum, on Wednesday, September 30th. Herding the fuzzy bits: What do you do after crowdsourcing? Biodiversity Heritage Library - Purposeful Gaming.

Smorball and Beanstalk: Games that aren’t just fun to play but help science too. Citizen Science Uses Art to Unlock Scientific Knowledge. Citizen Science Goes Meta. Citizen scientists discover new plant species in the Cape Floral Kingdom. Citizen science blog. Vital Signs. Citizen Science/class - iDigBio.