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World's Strangest Natural Wonders Ever played the game of Twister on water? The green, yellow, and brown polka dots that form on British Columbia’s Spotted Lake each summer make it look like you could. It’s a far cry from the stereotypical landscapes of clear blue lakes, rolling green hills, and white-sand beaches that inspire most travelers—and that’s part of what makes strange natural wonders like Spotted Lake so thrilling. A recently discovered cave that grows crystals the size of four-story buildings, a lake the color of a strawberry milkshake, and a glacier that seems to bleed sound like they’re from another planet, but can be seen right here on earth, and they remind us that there’s plenty of mystery left to explore. For billions of years, our planet has been a work in progress. Science Fair Projects This is selection of ideas for 1st grade science fair projects with short project descriptions or examples as well as links to the actual science fair projects. Some of this ideas could also be used for 2nd and 3rd grades (and vice versa). Also some second grade science project ideas and third grade project ideas could be used in the first grade so check them out. At this age science projects resemble either simple games or magic tricks. Then unlike the magician you should try to explain what's going on.

How to Keep Kids Engaged in Class Have you ever plunked yourself down in a staff meeting where some of your colleagues were, for lack of a better phrase, not paying attention? Grading homework? Having private conversations? Texting? As we know all too well, kids aren't a whole lot different than adults: If they aren't absorbed by what's going on, they'll find something else that interests them. Getting all your students focused, eager, and on task at the beginning of class is challenging enough. Preschool Activities Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member?

Annie Easley helped make modern spaceflight possible To celebrate Black History Month, Engadget is running a series of profiles honoring African-American pioneers in the world of science and technology. Today we take a look at the life and work of Annie Easley. Few people are brilliant enough to be a computer programmer or a mathematician. Even fewer can add "rocket scientist for NASA" to their resume.

Squirrel Proof Bird Feeder Ever since purchasing my first tube bird feeder I've found myself constantly at war with squirrels. I've tried various strategies; baffles, elaborate ways of hanging feeders from trees, separate squirrel feeders, dousing the bird seed with a hot pepper wash, etc.. all of which proved to be ineffective. I love nature, however it got to a point where 14 squirrels were ravaging the bird seed a day, and I stopped feeding the birds. I thought my bird feeding days were over, however after some much needed additional research I was able to design / build a very affordable squirrel proof bird feeder that really works! I have been so pleased with the design that I now have 3 such feeders in my yard, and built a 4th for my brother in order to put together this instructable.

International Women's Day: Five female scientists you probably haven't heard of - People - News - The Independent Their only common characteristic? They are women, and their appearance on the walls marks International Women’s Day. Try to recall a woman scientist and Marie Curie may be the first and perhaps only name that springs to mind. This is a shameful state of affairs, when for more than a century scientists who happen to be women have reached great scientific heights, despite the many barriers they faced on account of their gender. So here are five women whose amazing discoveries and contribution to science should be as well-known and respected as those of Marie Curie: Lise Meitner – nuclear physics Weekend Diversion: The astronomer who brought us the Universe — Starts With A Bang! “Her will tells nearly all. She left an estate worth $314.91, mostly in Liberty Bonds, with a few items such as a desk valued at $5. She never married and had few living relatives. She also left behind a legacy of a great astronomical discovery.” -Jeremy Bernstein, on Henrietta Leavitt

Science Fairs Aren't So Fair — Atlantic Mobile These K-12 events are hardly more than a competition among over-involved parents. As a parent of two elementary school-aged kids, I know spring is approaching when my Facebook feed fills with desperate pleas for more time, calls for patience, and questions about the locations of retailers selling tri-fold posters. Yes, it’s science-fair time. Last year, one mother’s satirical science-fair poster titled "How Much Turmoil Does the Science Project Cause Families?" went viral as parents around the country vented their anger toward this most frustrating of school assignments. Huge Alien Planet Bathes in the Light of Four Suns Huge Alien Planet Bathes in the Light of Four Suns Astronomers have spotted a fourth star in a planetary system called 30 Ari, bringing the number of known planet-harboring quadruple-sun systems to two. "Star systems come in myriad forms. There can be single stars, binary stars, triple stars, even quintuple star systems," study lead author Lewis Roberts, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in a statement.

Sat-navs and mobile apps 'threaten map-reading skills' - BBC News Map-reading skills are under threat because of a growing reliance on smartphones and sat-navs, experts say. The Royal Institute of Navigation (RIN) said increasing dependence on technology means people are losing the ability to find their way by traditional methods. The RIN wants schools to encourage the teaching of basic map-reading because few pupils can read one. Its president, Roger McKinlay, said society is "sedated by software".

Some spiders can sail across oceans, scientists say But that's no reason for arachnophobes suddenly to start climbing flag poles. A select number of creepy-crawlies have been doing this for eons, researchers now say, because a good many of them can sail quite adeptly. They can harness wind, weigh anchor and toss a line to a raft. Also, poles wouldn't offer arachnophobes a complete escape, because many spiders can fly, too, by catching a breeze in lines of web they spew from their abdomens, a feat called ballooning. It can take them to the neighbor's yard or to a neighboring continent. Myths about spiders and water

This mesmerizing video shows how incredibly vast space really is Light travels at about 186,000 miles per second. That's an incomprehensibly fast speed — faster than any other object in the universe. But the video above shows how huge just our corner of the galaxy is, even for a photon of light traveling at that remarkable speed. The film, by artist Alphonse Swinehart, gives you the view you'd see if you were a particle of light traveling from the sun across the solar system — even though it's 45 minutes long, you still don't even reach Saturn.

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