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Solve Puzzles for Science

Solve Puzzles for Science
Hey everyone! I will be leading a Science Café about Foldit at the Southpaw Social Club, in San Diego, on April 28. The purpose of the event is to engage with the community in a casual, comfortable setting to talk about the exciting science of protein folding and the Foldit computer game. There will be a short presentation on the science behind Foldit, but the event is mostly dedicated to Q & A and open discussion with the audience. We're very excited about this opportunity to share Foldit in such a personable format! This is also a great chance for any Foldit players in the San Diego area to come together and talk to a member of the Foldit team.

http://fold.it/portal/

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Serious Games At The British Museum Serious Games exploring the British Museum's collection Great Court Space - Courtesy the British Museum The British Museum's new website for kids called Young Explorers is all about world histories and cultures. It has games, including the amazing Time Explorer, and more. Time Explorer is the new adventure game from the British Museum. In Time Explorer, players have to travel back in time to explore ancient cultures and rescue precious objects from imminent disaster.

Rosetta@home Fluorescent proteins designed from scratch Congrats to all Rosetta@home volunteers who contributed to a recent report in Nature describing the design of a completely artificial fluorescent beta-barrel protein. As described by one of the main authors, Anastassia, in this forum post: The paper presents many “firsts” in computational protein design. It is the first de novo design of the beta-barrel fold (one of the most described folds in the past 35 years, yet mysterious until now). It is also the first de novo design of a protein tailored to bind a small-molecule, which requires very high accuracy in the placement of side chains on protein backbones assembled from scratch. Neuroscience: Hardwired for taste : Nature A mouthful of bittersweet chocolate cake with a molten centre can trigger potent memories of pleasure, lust and even love. But all it takes is one bad oyster to make you steer clear of this mollusc for life. Neuroscientists who study taste are just beginning to understand how and why the interaction of a few molecules on your tongue can trigger innate behaviours or intense memories.

Foldit Foldit is an online puzzle video game about protein folding. The game is part of an experimental research project, and is developed by the University of Washington's Center for Game Science in collaboration with the UW Department of Biochemistry. The objective of the game is to fold the structure of selected proteins as well as possible, using various tools provided within the game. The highest scoring solutions are analysed by researchers, who determine whether or not there is a native structural configuration (or native state) that can be applied to the relevant proteins, in the "real world". Scientists can then use such solutions to solve "real-world" problems, by targeting and eradicating diseases, and creating biological innovations. History[edit]

Game Mechanics « The book of inspiration Game Mechanics [...] “If I give you points every time you brush your teeth, you’ll stop brushing your teeth b/c it’s good for you and then only do it for the points. If the points stop flowing, your teeth will decay.” Jesse Schell Ada Chen from Mochimedia on Zynga’s Frontierville: BEAT THE CENSOR - an illustration of different censoring attempts SCORE: 0000 | Users connected: 000 Why do some countries censor the internet? Frankly we do not know and you would need to ask the respective governments why they are doing it. Where does the data comes from? We use a mashup of data coming from herdict.org and the OpenNet Initiative. The data was made available to us during the EU Hackathon 2011. Gaming the System: Video Gamers Help Researchers Untangle Protein Folding Problem What if the brainpower used playing video games could be channeled toward something more productive, such as helping scientists solve complex biological problems? A team of biochemists and computer scientists from the University of Washington (U.W.) in Seattle now reports that they have successfully tapped into this human problem-solving potential. Their competitive online game "Foldit," released in 2008, enlists the help of online puzzle-solvers to help crack one of science's most intractable mysteries—how proteins fold into their complex three-dimensional forms. The "puzzles" gamers solve are 3-D representations of partially folded proteins, which players manipulate and reshape to achieve the greatest number of points.

How Do Animals Become Zombies? Instant Egghead [Video] It may sound like something straight out of a horror movie, but many animals can come under the zombie-like control of parasites. So what about humans? Scientific American editor Katherine Harmon fills us in on the ghoulish side of Nature. Give a Gift & Get a Gift - Free! Citizen science Citizen science (also known as crowd science, crowd-sourced science, civic science, or networked science) is scientific research conducted, in whole or in part, by amateur or nonprofessional scientists, often by crowdsourcing and crowdfunding. Formally, citizen science has been defined as "the systematic collection and analysis of data; development of technology; testing of natural phenomena; and the dissemination of these activities by researchers on a primarily avocational basis".[1] Citizen science is sometimes called "public participation in scientific research."[2] Definition[edit] The "Green Paper on Citizen Science: Citizen Science for Europe" refers to "the general public engagement in scientific research activities when citizens actively contribute to science either with their intellectual effort or surrounding knowledge or with their tools and resources.

GameStop under fire for removing free coupons from Deus Ex: Human Revolution The battle over digital game distribution just took a turn for the ugly. Deus Ex: Human Revolution (Square Enix) Video game retail giant GameStop has been opening up brand new PC game boxes of the critically-acclaimed shooter Deus Ex: Human Revolution and removing packed-in coupons granting free copies of the game to users of the OnLive cloud gaming service. OnLive and Deus Ex publisher Square Enix announced the coupon deal yesterday, which would let buyers of a boxed PC copy download and play another copy of the game, for free, via OnLive's cloud based network, a $50 value. But apparently GameStop, which has its own digital distribution platform, wasn't on board with what it believes is helping to promote the competition. A letter sent out to GameStop employees instructing them to "immediately remove and discard the OnLive coupon from all the regular PC versions of Deus Ex: Human Revolution" has been widely circulated, and GameStop has since officially confirmed the practice.

Kodu Kodu is a new visual programming language made specifically for creating games. It is designed to be accessible for children and enjoyable for anyone. The programming environment runs on the Xbox, allowing rapid design iteration using only a game controller for input. Programming as a Creative Medium Gamers beat algorithms at finding protein structures Today's issue of Nature contains a paper with a rather unusual author list. Read past the standard collection of academics, and the final author credited is... an online gaming community. Scientists have turned to games for a variety of reasons, having studied virtual epidemics and tracked online communities and behavior, or simply used games to drum up excitement for the science. But this may be the first time that the gamers played an active role in producing the results, having solved problems in protein structure through the Foldit game.

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