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Music theory

Music theory
Music theory considers the practices and possibilities of music. It is generally derived from observation of how musicians and composers actually make music, but includes hypothetical speculation. Most commonly, the term describes the academic study and analysis of fundamental elements of music such as pitch, rhythm, harmony, and form, but also refers to descriptions, concepts, or beliefs related to music. Because of the ever-expanding conception of what constitutes music (see Definition of music), a more inclusive definition could be that music theory is the consideration of any sonic phenomena, including silence, as it relates to music. Music theory is a subfield of musicology, which is itself a subfield within the overarching field of the arts and humanities. Etymologically, music theory is an act of contemplation of music, from the Greek θεωρία, a looking at, viewing, contemplation, speculation, theory, also a sight, a spectacle. History of music theory[edit] Pitch[edit] Play . Play . Related:  music theory

Elements of Music Elements of Music Pitch – register (high or low); Organization of pitches with a pattern of intervals between them creates scales; Words we might use to describe scales: major/minor, chromatic, gapped, pentatonic. Rhythm – the time element of music. A specific rhythm is a specific pattern in time; we usually hear these in relation to a steady pulse, and mentally organize this pulse or tempo into meter (sometimes called a "time signature"). Meter organizes beats into groups, usually of two or three; beats can be divided into small units usually 2, 3 or 4 subdivisions Melody, or musical line, is a combination of pitch and rhythm (some say "duration"). Timbre – sound quality or tone color; timbre is the characteristic that allows us to distinguish between one instrument and another, and the difference between vowel sounds (for example, long "a" or "ee"). Dynamics – loud or soft. Texture – monophonic (one voice or line), METER and examples

Free Music Theory Worksheets! Material on this page is free.NEW! you can now consult an index of terms used in these worksheets.Also explore a page of worksheet extras: Worksheet Answers, Test Templates and Flash Presentations. Here are some testimonials from music teachers about these workbook chapters: I have been using your fantastic music theory sheets and PDF downloads to teach high school piano theory to 28 students per class, all of whom are at different levels of study and accomplishment. Your method is comprehensive and easily accessible to students of all ages. What a great philanthropist and talented musician you are and it is indeed a pleasure to have discovered that I can thank you (in person) on Facebook ... I am excited about the way my students have received this material. Joyce T. Hi, I am a High School teacher in California and I found your Theory Website. Material on this page is free.NEW! Here are some testimonials from music teachers about these workbook chapters: Joyce T.

Harmony Barbershop quartets, such as this US Navy group, sing 4-part pieces, made up of a melody line (normally the lead) and 3 harmony parts. Etymology and definitions[edit] The term harmony derives from the Greek ἁρμονία (harmonía), meaning "joint, agreement, concord",[4] from the verb ἁρμόζω (harmozo), "to fit together, to join".[5] The term was often used for the whole field of music, while "music" referred to the arts in general. In Ancient Greece, the term defined the combination of contrasted elements: a higher and lower note.[6] Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the simultaneous sounding of notes was part of ancient Greek musical practice; "harmonía" may have merely provided a system of classification of the relationships between different pitches. In the Middle Ages the term was used to describe two pitches sounding in combination, and in the Renaissance the concept was expanded to denote three pitches sounding together.[6] Historical rules[edit] Types[edit] Close position C major triad.

A different way to visualize rhythm - John Varney To learn more on circular perceptions of rhythm with specific reference to African music, read this paper and then watch this Five(ish) Minute Drum Lesson on African Drumming. How has drumming played an essential role in African culture? What do specific rhythms represent? Interested in the software applications of a circular rhythmic approach? What are the pros of representing rhythm with a circular representation as opposed to using a more traditional linear representation? What exactly is rhythm? How does the beat of a song differ from its rhythm? As seen from this TED Ed lesson, different cultures share similar rhythms. Rhythm and Math are related? Just love music and want to learn more? How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins Why we love repetition in music - Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis Music as a language -Victor Wooten

Pythagorean tuning The syntonic tuning continuum, showing Pythagorean tuning at 702 cents.[1] Diatonic scale on C Play 12-tone equal tempered and Play just intonation. Pythagorean (tonic) major chord on C Play (compare Play equal tempered and Play just). Comparison of equal-tempered (black) and Pythagorean (green) intervals showing the relationship between frequency ratio and the intervals' values, in cents. The system had been mainly attributed to Pythagoras (sixth century BC) by modern authors of music theory, while Ptolemy, and later Boethius, ascribed the division of the tetrachord by only two intervals, called "semitonium", "tonus", "tonus" in Latin (256:243 x 9:8 x 9:8), to Eratosthenes. Method[edit] Pythagorean tuning is based on a stack of intervals called perfect fifths, each tuned in the ratio 3:2, the next simplest ratio after 2:1. This succession of eleven 3:2 intervals spans across a wide range of frequency (on a piano keyboard, it encompasses 77 keys). Size of intervals[edit] (e.g. between E♭ and E)

Elements of Music - The Basic Elements of Music By Espie Estrella Updated December 16, 2014. Sound is created when an object vibrates. These vibrations are perceived by our ears and then sent to our brain. Our brain in turn analyzes these signals and let's us know what type of sound we are hearing (i.e. an alarm clock ringing, a car horn blaring, etc.). When you listen to a piece of music, you'll notice that it has several different characteristics; it may be soft or loud, slow or fast, combine different instruments and have a regular rhythmic pattern. All of these are known as the "elements of music." Beat and Meter - In order to define meter, let's first define beats. continue reading below our video Play Video Harmony - In general, harmony refers to the combination of notes (or chords) played together and the relationship between a series of chords.

Chordbook.com - Learn Guitar Chords, Scales, Guitar Tuner Musical composition Musical composition can refer to an original piece of music, the structure of a musical piece, or the process of creating a new piece of music. People who practice composition are called composers. Although today composition is considered to consist of the manipulation of each aspect of music (harmony, melody, form, rhythm, and timbre), according to Jean Benjamin de Laborde (1780): Composition consists in two things only. The first is the ordering and disposing of several sounds...in such a manner that their succession pleases the ear. Musical compositions[edit] A piece of music exists in the form of a composition in musical notation or as a single acoustic event (a live performance or recorded track). Composition as musical form[edit] Composing music[edit] Methods Another method involves free playing of your desired instrument. As technology progresses, new and inventive methods of music composition come about. Structure Composers may decide to divide their music into sections. In the U.S.

How maths helps us understand why music moves people Music is known to provoke the senses, give pleasure and sometimes move people to tears. Surely this has little to do with mathematical models which are so frequently associated with cold and rational logic. So what can maths tell us about this powerful phenomenon closely connected to the emotions? Can mathematics help us measure what’s sublime or ineffable about a piece of music? Music evokes strong emotions such as frisson (goose bumps), awe and laughter – and has been found to use the same reward pathways as food, drugs and sex to induce pleasure. A shiver down one’s spine or an uncontrollable guffaw when listening to music is most often a case of the music defying your expectations. On one end of the spectrum, a performance or a piece of music that does just what you’d expect runs the risk of becoming banal. Author provided Listen PDQ Bach: The Short-tempered Clavier: Minuet in C Download MP3 / 735 KB Playing with expectations Listen Happy Birthday (first part) Download MP3 / 284 KB

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