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Music theory

Music theory
Music theory considers the practices and possibilities of music. It is generally derived from observation of how musicians and composers actually make music, but includes hypothetical speculation. Most commonly, the term describes the academic study and analysis of fundamental elements of music such as pitch, rhythm, harmony, and form, but also refers to descriptions, concepts, or beliefs related to music. Because of the ever-expanding conception of what constitutes music (see Definition of music), a more inclusive definition could be that music theory is the consideration of any sonic phenomena, including silence, as it relates to music. Music theory is a subfield of musicology, which is itself a subfield within the overarching field of the arts and humanities. Etymologically, music theory is an act of contemplation of music, from the Greek θεωρία, a looking at, viewing, contemplation, speculation, theory, also a sight, a spectacle. History of music theory[edit] Pitch[edit] Play . Play .

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A different way to visualize rhythm - John Varney To learn more on circular perceptions of rhythm with specific reference to African music, read this paper and then watch this Five(ish) Minute Drum Lesson on African Drumming. How has drumming played an essential role in African culture? What do specific rhythms represent? Interested in the software applications of a circular rhythmic approach? What are the pros of representing rhythm with a circular representation as opposed to using a more traditional linear representation? This article will help you learn more. Pythagorean tuning The syntonic tuning continuum, showing Pythagorean tuning at 702 cents.[1] Diatonic scale on C Play 12-tone equal tempered and Play just intonation. Pythagorean (tonic) major chord on C

Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People by Toby W. Rush NEW (8 April 2016): Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People is now available in three new languages: Basque, Brazilian Portuguese, and Russian! Sparky the Music Theory Dog is on Twitter and Facebook! Chromatic scale Chromatic scale drawn as a circle: each note is equidistant from its neighbors, separated by a semitone of the same size. The most common conception of the chromatic scale before the 13th century was the Pythagorean chromatic scale. Due to a different tuning technique, the twelve semitones in this scale have two slightly different sizes.

Some Interesting Keyboards Some books about music refer to a persistent "myth" that it is possible, using only two keyboards, to construct an instrument on which it is possible to play music in any key using just intonation. Indeed, it is true that it is not possible, with only 24 keys to the octave, to construct an instrument that will play in perfect just intonation in every key. However, it is possible to exhibit an example of the type of keyboard that has given rise to this "myth", so that its capabilities, as well as its limitations, can be seen. Thus, what may be constructed with 24 keys to the octave is a keyboard which allows playing diatonic music in just intonation in any of the twelve conventionally designated keys, even if nothing can be ensured concerning the pitch of accidentals, and with the provision that one has to make a jump in pitch when one transposes around the far end of the circle of fifths.

Circle of fifths Circle of fifths showing major and minor keys Nikolay Diletsky's circle of fifths in Idea grammatiki musikiyskoy (Moscow, 1679) In music theory, the circle of fifths (or circle of fourths) is a visual representation of the relationships among the 12 tones of the chromatic scale, their corresponding key signatures, and the associated major and minor keys. More specifically, it is a geometrical representation of relationships among the 12 pitch classes of the chromatic scale in pitch class space. Definition[edit] Structure and use[edit]

The Essential Secrets of Songwriting Blog Harmonic series (music) Harmonic series of a string with terms written as reciprocals (2/1 written as 1/2). A harmonic series is the sequence of all multiples of a base frequency. Any complex tone "can be described as a combination of many simple periodic waves (i.e., sine waves) or partials, each with its own frequency of vibration, amplitude, and phase."[1] (Fourier analysis) A partial is any of the sine waves by which a complex tone is described.

Music, Fibonacci numbers and relationships to Phi Musical scales are based on Fibonacci numbers The Fibonacci series appears in the foundation of aspects of art, beauty and life. Even music has a foundation in the series, as: There are 13 notes in the span of any note through its octave.A scale is composed of 8 notes, of which the5th and 3rd notes create the basic foundation of all chords, andare based on a tone which are combination of 2 steps and 1 step from the root tone, that is the 1st note of the scale. Note too how the piano keyboard scale of C to C above of 13 keys has 8 white keys and 5 black keys, split into groups of 3 and 2.While some might “note” that there are only 12 “notes” in the scale, if you don’t have a root and octave, a start and an end, you have no means of calculating the gradations in between, so this 13th note as the octave is essential to computing the frequencies of the other notes.

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