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The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

LiveMinutes Creating ToonDoo Cartoons | A Teacher's Guide to ToonDoo Creating Your First ToonDoo Here is a simple ToonDoo. With the information on this page, you will be able to create this cartoon, or a similar cartoon of your own. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Congratulations! Design Menu The Design Menu on the ToonDoo creation screen is pictured below. Main Menu From the Main Menu you can create, save, or open a new ToonDoo. Characters The Characters menu offers your the choice of hundreds of different ToonDoo characters. Backgrounds There are dozens of cartoon panel backgrounds to choose from here. Props The Props menu is just what you need for adding important details to your ToonDoo. Text The Text menu lets you create dialog balloons to make your ToonDoo characters come alive. Brushmen This menu catalogs all of the graphic elements in Toondoo–characters, props, backgrounds–by the artist who created the graphic. My Galleries Tools Menu The Tools menu gives you a variety of options for manipulating your graphics to suit your desires. Props Menu

Fastest Way to Create Comic Strips and Cartoons - Toondoo Great Resources for Teaching Using Comics March , 2014 A few days ago I shared with you here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning a list featuring some of the best web tools that you can use with your students to create comics. As a teacher you can leverage the power of comics in several ways: you can use them for teaching writing, reading and speaking. Comics are also a good way for students to build and create their stories and share them with others. To help you better tap into the educational power of comics , I am sharing with you these two wonderful presentations where you will get to experiment with some new ideas of how to use comics in your instruction. 1- Tap into the world of comics 2- Online Comic Creators

40+ Resources for Teaching Using Animation and Comics January 27, 2014 Some of the animation links catalogued here will give educators very basic tools and histories of animation while others have the animation already created and set in motion, it’s just a matter of sharing it with students. Educators need to decide which tool is best for them. If you want to create your own animation from scratch, then you want to go to sites such as Animwork. If you want to select from animation that’s already set up for you then perhaps Explainia makes more sense. 1. Animation for Education In this support system for educators, iCreate to Educate helps teachers and schools from primary through higher education become better learners by making animation more accessible throughout Europe. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. The following links will help educators find animation that’s already set in motion. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 40. 41. 43. 45. 46. 47. 48. 50.

The Four Elements of Physical Energy and How To Master Them I have a FitBit (glorified pedometer if I ever saw one), and since getting it, my exercise goal each day is to hit 5,000 steps. On work days, I generally hit 2,000-3,000 each day consistently, meaning I only need to take a walk around the block twice when I get home to meet my goal. Recently, due to winter, I mostly was just pacing back and forth in my apartment while watching Netflix. I find that having a goal for step count rather than exercise is easier, because some days I just don't *feel* like exercising (like Saturdays, when I am running around doing errands), and typically on those days, I get a bunch of steps in anyways. I combine this method with Jerry Scienfeld's method of "Don't Break the Chain," which REALLY helps come Sunday when I'm not doing anything or going anywhere, and therefore really do need to concentrate to get my 5k steps in.

6 Things The Most Productive People Do Every Day Ever feel like you’re just not getting enough done? Know how many days per week you’re actually productive? About 3: People work an average of 45 hours a week; they consider about 17 of those hours to be unproductive (U.S.: 45 hours a week; 16 hours are considered unproductive). We could all be accomplishing a lot more — but then again, none of us wants to be a workaholic either. It’d be great to get tons done and have work/life balance. And who better to ask than Tim Ferriss, author of the international bestseller, The 4-Hour Workweek? (Tim’s blog is here and his podcast is here.) Below are six tips Tim offered, the science behind why they work, and insight from the most productive people around. 1) Manage Your Mood Most productivity systems act like we’re robots — they forget the enormous power of feelings. If you start the day calm it’s easy to get the right things done and focus. Here’s Tim: I try to have the first 80 to 90 minutes of my day vary as little as possible. Research shows email:

10 Laws of Productivity You might think that creatives as diverse as Internet entrepreneur Jack Dorsey, industrial design firm Studio 7.5, and bestselling Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami would have little in common. In fact, the tenets that guide how they – and exceptionally productive creatives across the board – make ideas happen are incredibly similar. Here are 10 laws of productivity we’ve consistently observed among serial idea executors: 1. A bias toward action is the most common trait we’ve found across the hundreds of creative professionals and entrepreneurs we’ve interviewed. 2. When our ideas are still in our head, we tend to think big, blue sky concepts. 3. Trial and error is an essential part of any creative’s life. To avoid ‘blue sky paralysis,’ pare your idea down to a small, immediately executable concept. 4. When working on in-depth projects, we generate lots of new ideas along the way. 5. 6. Part of being able to work on your project a little bit each day is carving out the time to do so. 7.

The Magic of Doing One Thing at a Time - Tony Schwartz by Tony Schwartz | 8:53 AM March 14, 2012 Why is it that between 25% and 50% of people report feeling overwhelmed or burned out at work? It’s not just the number of hours we’re working, but also the fact that we spend too many continuous hours juggling too many things at the same time. What we’ve lost, above all, are stopping points, finish lines and boundaries. Tell the truth: Do you answer email during conference calls (and sometimes even during calls with one other person)? The biggest cost — assuming you don’t crash — is to your productivity. But most insidiously, it’s because if you’re always doing something, you’re relentlessly burning down your available reservoir of energy over the course of every day, so you have less available with every passing hour. I know this from my own experience. If you’re a manager, here are three policies worth promoting: 1. 2. 3. It’s also up to individuals to set their own boundaries. 1. 2. 3.

Time Management Tips: How to Find the Right Mindset to Succeed With Time Management | The Best Time Management Tips For the past several years I have worked with time management techniques such as lists, prioritization, planning and so on. But it wasn’t until I adopted a Quadrant 2 mindset that I really started seeing results. . 1. How to tackle the different tasks Each task needs to be tackled in a specific way, at a specific time and handled right. them the repercussions could be bad. tasks as you do when working in Quadrant 1 but without all the stress and pressure of the first quadrant. working on time management I want you to remember this mindset, use all the exercises we discuss to further increase the time you spend in Quadrant 2 and decrease the time you spend in the other Quadrants. on how to become efficient you should join The Time Management Expert Course. system that can save you over 2000 hours/year, time that can be put to better things, like living life! I have something you are going to be interested in checking out. Click Here Now To Find Out The Details! Comments comments

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