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Lesson Plan: Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics

Lesson Plan: Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics
Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice This lesson is used for discussion of a novel read by the whole class. Working individually and in groups, using symbols, drawings, shapes, and colors, alongside words and quotations, students construct a graphic of their section of the novel using an online tool and on newsprint or butcher paper with crayons or markers. back to top Literary Graffiti Interactive: Using this online tool, students draw images about a text they are reading. Claggett (1992) states that "the use of graphics will help students make meaning as they read, write, and act, [which] is firmly rooted in current thinking about how the mind works." Teaching students to visualize what they are reading and create graphic symbols helps them develop as readers. Further Reading Claggett, Fran, and Joan Brown. 1992. Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. Dale, Helen. 1997. Related:  Reading Assessments

FREE -- Teaching Resources and Lesson Plans from the Federal Government FREE Features These features originally appeared on the FREE.ED.gov features blog. The features highlight resources and ideas related to holidays, awareness months, anniversaries and seasonal topics. January February March April May June July August Back to School: 7 Ways to Help Kids Transition Back to the Classroom September October November December About FREE Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE) offered a way to find digital teaching and learning resources created and maintained by the federal government and public and private organizations. FREE was conceived in 1997 by a federal working group in response to a memo from the President. Technology has made it increasingly easier to find information from government agencies or with custom search tools, like Kids.gov. FREE Disclaimer The U.S.

Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Unit Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction with "Little Red Riding Hood Text" Sets back to top

What is a LiveBinder Scholarcast More Ideas Than You’ll Ever Use for Book Reports Submitted by Teacher-2-Teacher contributor Kim Robb of Summerland, BC Create life-sized models of two of your favorite characters and dress them as they are dressed in the book. Crouch down behind your character and describe yourself as the character.

Thinkfinity Browse Resources Verizon Foundation proudly partners with some of the country’s top educational organizations to provide you with the latest topics, tools and trends in education. Created by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, ARTSEDGE provides resources and examples for teachers to teach in, through and about the arts. The site includes lesson plans, advocacy and professional development resources, and up-to-date information on arts programs from around the world. Visit ARTSEDGE Developed by the Council for Economic Education, EconEdLink provides teachers and students with lessons and classroom learning activities based on economics topics in the news and real-time economics data. Visit EconEdLink Presented by the National Endowment for the Humanities, EDSITEment features lesson plans and additional classroom resources about art and culture, literature and language arts, foreign language, history and social studies. Visit EDSITEment Visit Illuminations Visit ReadWriteThink

Cube Creator Summarizing information is an important postreading and prewriting activity that helps students synthesize what they have learned. The interactive Cube Creator offers four options: Bio Cube: This option allows students to develop an outline of a person whose biography or autobiography they have just read; it can also be used before students write their own autobiography. Specific prompts ask students to describe a person's significance, background, and personality. Mystery Cube: Use this option to help your students sort out the clues in their favorite mysteries or develop outlines for their own stories. Among its multiple applications, the Mystery Cube helps students identify mystery elements, practice using vocabulary from this popular genre, and sort and summarize information. Story Cube: In this cube option, students can summarize the key elements in a story, including character, setting, conflict, resolution, and theme. Create-Your-Own Cube: Working on a science unit? back to top

LiveBinders Tutorial 1: The Set Up

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