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Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics

Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature Using Graphics
Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice This lesson is used for discussion of a novel read by the whole class. Working individually and in groups, using symbols, drawings, shapes, and colors, alongside words and quotations, students construct a graphic of their section of the novel using an online tool and on newsprint or butcher paper with crayons or markers. When all groups have completed their graphics, they will present them to the class, explaining why they chose the elements they used. back to top Literary Graffiti Interactive: Using this online tool, students draw images about a text they are reading. Claggett (1992) states that "the use of graphics will help students make meaning as they read, write, and act, [which] is firmly rooted in current thinking about how the mind works." Teaching students to visualize what they are reading and create graphic symbols helps them develop as readers. Further Reading Claggett, Fran, and Joan Brown. 1992. Armstrong, Thomas. 2003.

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More Ideas Than You’ll Ever Use for Book Reports Submitted by Teacher-2-Teacher contributor Kim Robb of Summerland, BC Create life-sized models of two of your favorite characters and dress them as they are dressed in the book. Crouch down behind your character and describe yourself as the character. Tell what your role is in the book and how you relate to the other character you have made. English Learner Education Guidelines The Minnesota Department of Education’s English Learner (EL) program ensures equity and access to a high-quality education to ensure English learners are able to reach their highest potential. MDE supports local education agencies (LEAs) to develop, implement and evaluate research-based language instruction education programs for English learners to attain English proficiency and achieve state academic content standards. MDE facilitates academic excellence for English learners by promoting professional development, providing technical assistance, administering state and federal language education programs, and by establishing measures of accountability.

Teaching Resources and Lesson Plans from the Federal Government FREE Features These features originally appeared on the FREE.ED.gov features blog. The features highlight resources and ideas related to holidays, awareness months, anniversaries and seasonal topics. Creative Literature Projects Students Love Sometimes it’s difficult to get students interested in literature, especially the classics. Spicing up lesson plans with some creative projects allows students who are not traditionally academically successful to show what they’ve learned in a slightly different way. The results can be refreshing and rewarding! Here are ways you can spice up your lessons as well have examples of what I have done in my classroom.

My Best of series I’ve separated my “The Best…” lists here by topics. A number of the lists, though, can fit into multiple categories, so it still might be useful to scan all of them. The Websites Of The Year page on this blog, on the other hand, has these lists in the chronological order in which they’ve been written. Please note that I continually update and revise all of the lists. Thinkfinity Browse Resources Verizon Foundation proudly partners with some of the country’s top educational organizations to provide you with the latest topics, tools and trends in education. Created by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, ARTSEDGE provides resources and examples for teachers to teach in, through and about the arts. The site includes lesson plans, advocacy and professional development resources, and up-to-date information on arts programs from around the world. Visit ARTSEDGE

Beyond the Book Report: Ways to Respond to Literature Using New York Times Models Victor J. Blue for The New York TimesWord, a bookstore in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, provides guidance to browsers with irreverent “shelf talkers,” like this one for “The Book of Night Women,” by Marlon James.Go to related article » | Go to related slide show » Below, we present some alternatives to that classic classroom assignment, the book report. All of our ideas are inspired by The New York Times in some way, either because we’ve adapted an interesting format, or because we were inspired by an article, review, essay, interview or multimedia feature. Do you assign book reports, in any format, to your students? What do they look like?

The Flipped Classroom or Curriculum - School of TEFL Fromthe Economist, they offer some cursory advice about the Flipped Curriculum. Do you agree - I'm not convinced by most of their arguement. THE 12-year-olds filing into Courtney Cadwell’s classroom at Egan Junior High in Los Altos, a leafy suburb of Silicon Valley, each take a white MacBook from a trolley, log on to a website called KhanAcademy.org and begin doing maths exercises. They will not get a lecture from Ms Cadwell, because they have already viewed, at home, various lectures as video clips on KhanAcademy (given by Salman Khan, its founder). And Ms Cadwell, logged in as a “coach”, can see exactly who has watched which. This means that class time is now free for something else: one-on-one instruction by Ms Cadwell, or what used to be known as tutoring.

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