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Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature

Graffiti Wall: Discussing and Responding to Literature
Overview Featured Resources From Theory to Practice This lesson is used for discussion of a novel read by the whole class. Working individually and in groups, using symbols, drawings, shapes, and colors, alongside words and quotations, students construct a graphic of their section of the novel using an online tool and on newsprint or butcher paper with crayons or markers. back to top Literary Graffiti Interactive: Using this online tool, students draw images about a text they are reading. Claggett (1992) states that "the use of graphics will help students make meaning as they read, write, and act, [which] is firmly rooted in current thinking about how the mind works." Teaching students to visualize what they are reading and create graphic symbols helps them develop as readers. Further Reading Claggett, Fran, and Joan Brown. 1992. Armstrong, Thomas. 2003. Dale, Helen. 1997. Related:  Reading AssessmentsTHEORY

What is a LiveBinder Story Map The Story Map interactive includes a set of graphic organizers designed to assist teachers and students in prewriting and postreading activities. The organizers are intended to focus on the key elements of character, setting, conflict, and resolution development. Students can develop multiple characters, for example, in preparation for writing their own fiction, or they may reflect on and further develop characters from stories they have read. After completing individual sections or the entire organizer, students have the ability to print out their final versions for feedback and assessment. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Standard Lesson Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting Students hone their teamwork skills and play off each other's writing strengths as they participate in prewriting activities for a story to be written collaboratively by the whole class. Grades K – 2 | Lesson Plan | Unit Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction with "Little Red Riding Hood Text" Sets back to top

More Ideas Than You’ll Ever Use for Book Reports Submitted by Teacher-2-Teacher contributor Kim Robb of Summerland, BC Create life-sized models of two of your favorite characters and dress them as they are dressed in the book. Crouch down behind your character and describe yourself as the character. English Learner Education Guidelines The Minnesota Department of Education’s English Learner (EL) program ensures equity and access to a high-quality education to ensure English learners are able to reach their highest potential. MDE supports local education agencies (LEAs) to develop, implement and evaluate research-based language instruction education programs for English learners to attain English proficiency and achieve state academic content standards. MDE facilitates academic excellence for English learners by promoting professional development, providing technical assistance, administering state and federal language education programs, and by establishing measures of accountability. The English Learner education guidelines available on this page include information on state and federal funding, program requirements, frequently asked questions and references to state and federal law.

LiveBinders Tutorial 1: The Set Up Cube Creator Summarizing information is an important postreading and prewriting activity that helps students synthesize what they have learned. The interactive Cube Creator offers four options: Bio Cube: This option allows students to develop an outline of a person whose biography or autobiography they have just read; it can also be used before students write their own autobiography. Specific prompts ask students to describe a person's significance, background, and personality. Mystery Cube: Use this option to help your students sort out the clues in their favorite mysteries or develop outlines for their own stories. Among its multiple applications, the Mystery Cube helps students identify mystery elements, practice using vocabulary from this popular genre, and sort and summarize information. Story Cube: In this cube option, students can summarize the key elements in a story, including character, setting, conflict, resolution, and theme. Create-Your-Own Cube: Working on a science unit? back to top

Creative Literature Projects Students Love Sometimes it’s difficult to get students interested in literature, especially the classics. Spicing up lesson plans with some creative projects allows students who are not traditionally academically successful to show what they’ve learned in a slightly different way. The results can be refreshing and rewarding! Here are ways you can spice up your lessons as well have examples of what I have done in my classroom. Creating Themed Environments in Your Classroom Creating a classroom party around a themed book topic can be fun and educational. My Great Gatsby Party Mastery-based learning is a classroom management solution for students who don'... A few outdoor teaching strategies that can help to maximize your students’... How to stress and teach kindness. A few teaching strategies to help your students think like optimists. Five classroom management reasons to let your students select their own stories. This is the first year I’ve tried this project, but it was fun and really successful. Poem Parody

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