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History - World Wars: Animated Map: The Western Front, 1914 - 1918

History - World Wars: Animated Map: The Western Front, 1914 - 1918
Britain and its Empire lost almost a million men during World War One; most of them died on the Western Front. Stretching 440 miles from the Swiss border to the North Sea, the line of trenches, dug-outs and barbed-wire fences moved very little between 1914-1918, despite attempts on both sides to break through. Pinpoint key locations along the Western Front, watch the general movements of both sides and view the battles of Ypres, Verdun and the Somme in more detail.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/launch_ani_western_front.shtml

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World War One - What is a Trench? Trench warfare characterised much of the fighting during World War One, particularly along the Western Front. Trench systems were complicated with many interlinking lines of trenches. Front Line Trench Cross Section Artillery Line Why our WWI casualty number are wrong Illustration: John Spooner Search for details of Australia’s dead and wounded in the First World War and the figures thrown up are remarkably similar: of the 331,000 men who embarked from Australia with the Australian Imperial Force (AIF), 60,000 were killed and there were 155,000 admissions for wounding. These statistics are presented, with minor variations, on the websites of the National Archives of Australia, the Australian War Memorial, the Australian War Graves Commission, the Australian Parliamentary Library, and in the records of the British War Office and Australia’s official history of the First World War by C.E.W Bean. Winning this war came at too high a cost for this young nation; for Australia, the First World War was indeed a pyrrhic victory. This means superficially around two out of three soldiers died or were wounded in the First World War. These figures have been quoted in every publication referring to Australia’s casualties since fighting stopped in 1918.

Untold stories Photos, letters and other memorabilia It was the war that tore Europe apart – a struggle between the central powers of Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey and Bulgaria, against the allied powers of Britain, France, Belgium, Russia, Italy and the USA. No European nation was left untouched – even neutral states felt the impact of the war.

Shellshock By 1914 British doctors working in military hospitals noticed patients suffering from "shell shock". Early symptoms included tiredness, irritability, giddiness, lack of concentration and headaches. Eventually the men suffered mental breakdowns making it impossible for them to remain in the front-line. Some came to the conclusion that the soldiers condition was caused by the enemy's heavy artillery. A Great War Soldier's Record 8493 / Private Donald Campbell Each member of the British army has service papers that record their army career. Upon joining the army, the first of these papers, called the Attestation Form, is filled in. The Causes and Effects That Led to World War I Sep 22, 2014 100 summers ago the countries of Europe collapsed quickly into war: it was sudden but also strangely inevitable. Countless books have been written since about the causes of The Great War, but in this video essay, delve.tv offers an alternative history. By tracing the story backwards in time, they stumble upon a very unexpected cause and discover that sometimes the most harmless of things can have terrible consequences. Story Design & Direction: Adam Westbrook Additional Photography: Brett Walsh Animation: Adam Westbrook

First World War Origins The First World War was caused by the destabilisation of the balance of power in Europe due to the rise of Germany. The war began in 1914 when Austria-Hungary invaded Serbia because of the assassination of an archduke. From trench to tomb: The unknown warrior's journey 11 November 2010Last updated at 02:12 By Mario Cacciottolo BBC News The tomb, in London's Westminster Abbey The unknown warrior was carried from a French battlefield 90 years ago, to be laid to rest among kings and statesmen in Westminster Abbey. But how did this symbol of the sacrifice of war come to be chosen?

Incredible bravery of WWI tank crew who survived 72 hours being bombarded by both Germans and their own side The crew of the Fray Bentos were trapped after their tank fell on its sideThey were attacked constantly by German machine guns and explosivesEven British guns tried to destroy the tank to keep it from enemy handsBut all but one of the men miraculously escaped the deadly situation By Kieran Corcoran Published: 21:31 GMT, 5 October 2013 | Updated: 21:31 GMT, 5 October 2013

U.S. enters World War I — History.com This Day in History — 4/6/1917 Apr 6, 1917: On April 6, 1917, two days after the U.S. Senate votes 82 to 6 to declare war against Germany, the U.S. House of Representatives endorses the decision by a vote of 373 to 50, and the United States formally enters the First World War. When World War I erupted in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson pledged neutrality for the United States, a position favored by the vast majority of Americans.

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