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Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan

Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan
In the 1930s, a new style of poster emerged that reflected the growing significance of the masses in Japanese society. These artistic posters borrowed elements from Western design and often incorporated bold slogans with political, economic and educational themes. Here are a few examples. Health Exercises for the People (Bureau of Postal Insurance, 1930) Tohoku Area Famine Relief (Federation of Tokyo Area Proletarian Organizations, 1931) The 2nd Proletarian Art Grand Exhibition (Japan Proletarian Artists Federation, 1929) Workers and Farmers Russian Art Exhibit (Japan Proletarian Art League, 1927) Listen! Safety Leads to Efficiency (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Proletarian Art Institute (1930) Poster for The Proletarian Graph Magazine (Proletarian News Company, 1929) Indulging in Alcohol Ruins Your Health (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Harufusa Ohashi (Election Poster for Labor-Farmer Party, 1928) Come, the Dawn of Mankind is Breaking (Farmers' Theater Performance, 1928) To Manchuria!

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