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Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan

Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan
In the 1930s, a new style of poster emerged that reflected the growing significance of the masses in Japanese society. These artistic posters borrowed elements from Western design and often incorporated bold slogans with political, economic and educational themes. Here are a few examples. Health Exercises for the People (Bureau of Postal Insurance, 1930) Tohoku Area Famine Relief (Federation of Tokyo Area Proletarian Organizations, 1931) The 2nd Proletarian Art Grand Exhibition (Japan Proletarian Artists Federation, 1929) Workers and Farmers Russian Art Exhibit (Japan Proletarian Art League, 1927) Listen! Safety Leads to Efficiency (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Proletarian Art Institute (1930) Poster for The Proletarian Graph Magazine (Proletarian News Company, 1929) Indulging in Alcohol Ruins Your Health (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Harufusa Ohashi (Election Poster for Labor-Farmer Party, 1928) Come, the Dawn of Mankind is Breaking (Farmers' Theater Performance, 1928) To Manchuria! Related:  World War IIHistory of Japan

Holocaust Timeline Jump to: 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1933 January 30, 1933 - Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany a nation with a Jewish population of 566,000. February 22, 1933 - 40,000 SA and SS men are sworn in as auxiliary police. February 27, 1933 - Nazis burn Reichstag building to create crisis atmosphere. February 28, 1933 - Emergency powers granted to Hitler as a result of the Reichstag fire. March 22, 1933 - Nazis open Dachau concentration camp near Munich, to be followed by Buchenwald near Weimar in central Germany, Sachsenhausen near Berlin in northern Germany, and Ravensbrück for women. March 24, 1933 - German Parliament passes Enabling Act giving Hitler dictatorial powers. Terms of use: Private home/school non-commercial, non-Internet re-usage only is allowed of any text, graphics, photos, audio clips, other electronic files or materials from The History Place.

Burakumin Terminology[edit] A widely used term for buraku settlements is dōwa chiku (同和地区 "assimilation districts"), an official term for districts designated for government and local authority assimilation projects. The social issue surrounding "discriminated communities" is usually referred to as dōwa mondai (同和問題 "assimilation issues") or less commonly, buraku mondai (部落問題"hamlet issues"). In the feudal era, the outcaste were called eta (穢多, literally, "an abundance of defilement" or "an abundance of filth"), a term now obviously considered derogatory. Eta towns were called etamura (穢多村). Some burakumin refer to their own communities as "mura" (村 "villages") and themselves as "mura-no-mono" (村の者 "village people"). Other outcaste groups from whom Buraku may have been descended included the hinin (非人—literally "non-human"). In the 19th century the umbrella term burakumin was coined to name the eta and hinin because both classes were forced to live in separate village neighborhoods.[1]

Bomb Sight - Mapping the World War 2 London Blitz Bomb Census Ainu people The Ainu (Japanese: アイヌ?), also called Aynu, Aino (アイノ?), and in historical texts Ezo (蝦夷?), are an indigenous people in Japan (Hokkaido) and Russia (Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands). Historically, they spoke Ainu and related varieties. History[edit] A group of Ainu people (between 1863 and early 1870s) Recent research suggests that Ainu culture originated in a merger of the Okhotsk and Satsumon cultures.[6] In 1264, Nivkh people reported to the Yuan Dynasty of China that Ainu invaded the land of Nivkh, resulting in battles between Ainu and the Yuan Dynasty.[7] Active contact between the Wajin (the ethnically Japanese) and the Ainu of Ezochi (now known as Hokkaido) began in the 13th century.[8] The Ainu formed a society of hunter-gatherers, living mainly by hunting and fishing, and the people followed a religion based on phenomena of nature.[9] In 1868 there were about 15,000 Ainu in Hokkaido, 2000 in Sakhalin, and around 100 in the Kurile islands.[11] Ainu bear sacrifice. Origins[edit]

Operation Mincemeat and spycraft in World War Two : The New York On April 30, 1943, a fisherman came across a badly decomposed corpse floating in the water off the coast of Huelva, in southwestern Spain. The body was of an adult male dressed in a trenchcoat, a uniform, and boots, with a black attaché case chained to his waist. His wallet identified him as Major William Martin, of the Royal Marines. It did not take long for word of the downed officer to make its way to German intelligence agents in the region. The Germans did not realize—until it was too late—that “William Martin” was a fiction. The story of Major William Martin is the subject of the British journalist Ben Macintyre’s brilliant and almost absurdly entertaining “Operation Mincemeat” (Harmony; $25.99). To fashion the container that would keep the corpse “fresh,” before it was dumped off the coast of Spain, Mincemeat’s planners turned to Charles Fraser-Smith, whom Ian Fleming is thought to have used as the model for Q in the James Bond novels. Cicero, it turned out, was the real thing.

Animated stereoviews of old Japan 28 Oct 2009 In the late 19th and early 20th century, enigmatic photographer T. Enami (1859-1929) captured a number of 3D stereoviews depicting life in Meiji-period Japan. [Sumo wrestlers] A stereoview consists of a pair of nearly identical images that appear three-dimensional when viewed through a stereoscope, because each eye sees a slightly different image. [Meeting at gate] [Buddhist ornament dealer] [Geisha washing their hands in the garden] [Chujenji Road, Nikko] [Geisha playing music] [Firewood dealers] [Great Buddha of Kamakura] [Torii gates at Inari shrine, Kyoto] [Geisha girls with flowers and cat] [Traveler in the mountain fog near Chujenji] [Clam diggers having lunch] [Tokyo Industrial Exposition, Ueno Park, 1907] [Campfire on the peak of Mt. [Geisha in a tearoom] [Kitano temple, Kyoto] [Road along the Fuji river] [Geisha drinking beer in the park] [Buddhist priest in full dress] [Geisha looking at stereoviews]

Paris sous l’'Occupation Rue de Rivoli. Photographie André Zucca. Bibliothèque historique de la Ville de Paris. L’arrivée des Allemands Aux aurores du 14 juin 1940, deux camions chargés de soldats allemands et quelques motocyclettes entrent par la Porte de la Villette dans Paris, déclaré “ville ouverte”. À 5 h 35, des troupes vert-de-gris sont aperçues descendant l’avenue de Flandre en direction des gares du Nord et de l’Est. Dans la matinée, un drapeau géant à croix gammée flotte sous l’Arc-de-Triomphe (il sera retiré dans la soirée, après protestation des conseillers municipaux), le premier défilé des troupes occupantes a lieu sur les Champs-Élysées. Relève de la garde. Si certains applaudissent et rient, d’autres, pris d’un sentiment d’horreur, ne cachent pas leurs larmes. Un ouvrier métallurgiste raconte l’enthousiasme débordant d’une spectatrice : J’étais à Paris le 14 juin. Ébahi, le Parisien découvre ce 14 juin l’ampleur du mensonge. Le dimanche 23 juin, second dimanche d’occupation, est ensoleillé. 1.

Battleship Island - Japan's rotting metropolis These days the only things that land on Hashima Island are the shits of passing seagulls. An hour or so’s sail from the port of Nagasaki, the abandoned island silently crumbles. A former coal mining facility owned by Mitsubishi Motors, it was once the most densely populated place on earth, packing over 13,000 people into each square kilometre of its residential high-risers. It operated from 1887 until 1974, after which the coal industry fell into decline and the mines were shut for good. Today it is illegal to go anywhere near the place as it's beyond restoration and totally unsafe. The punishment for being caught visiting Hashima Island is 30 days in prison followed by immediate deportation. Bobbing into view, the grey seawall’s artificial angling of the island gives it the shape of a battleship – hence its Japanese name in popular mythology, "Gunkanjima" - Battleship Island. We explored the empty classrooms of the island’s huge school.

Sous l'oeil de l'occupant, Cécile Desprairies tous les livres à la Fnac Le Mot de l'éditeur : Sous l'oeil de l'occupant 100 photos inédites pour décrypter la propagande allemande. Une centaine de photographies prises par la propagande allemande permettent de découvrir dans ce beau livre le quotidien, l’indifférence, l’attitude de collaboration passive de certains Français. Ces images officielles, souvent belles, poignantes, constituent un témoignage incontournable et inédit. Elles ne disent cependant pas la violence des répressions, les privations, les souffrances. Seul, le patient travail de décodage auquel s’est livré l'auteur permet de mettre en perspective leur face cachée. Coups de cœur des Libraires Haut de page Propagande EMMANUEL de FNAC Nantes Cet ouvrage constitué de photographies prises en France par l'occupant allemand permet de mieux comprendre la propagande de l'Axe durant la seconde guerre mondiale. Avis des internautes : "Sous l'oeil de l'occupant" Imprimer Envoyer cette page à un ami

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