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Scientists Now Know: We're From Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy!

Scientists Now Know: We're Not From Here! Summary & comments by Dan Eden for Viewzone "This first full-sky map of Sagittarius shows its extensive interaction with the Milky Way," Majewski said. "Both stars and star clusters now in the outer parts of the Milky Way have been 'stolen' from Sagittarius as the gravitational forces of the Milky Way nibbled away at its dwarf companion. This one vivid example shows that the Milky Way grows by eating its smaller neighbors." The study's map of M giants depicts 2 billion years of Sagittarius stripping by the Milky Way, and suggests that Sagittarius has reached a critical phase in what had been a slow dance of death. "After slow, continuous gnawing by the Milky Way, Sagittarius has been whittled down to the point that it cannot hold itself together much longer," said 2MASS Science Team member and study co-author Martin Weinberg of the University of Massachusetts. Does this mean we are at a unique moment in the life of our galaxy? From Dan Eden: Hi Dan, Related:  astronomy, outer space and our solar systemGalactic astronomy

The 6 Most Mind-Blowing Things Ever Discovered in Space It's actually really easy to think of space as boring. The planets in our own solar system all seem to be empty rocks or balls of gas, and you find a whole lot of nothing before you get to the next star. Meanwhile, Hollywood's most creative minds can't get past populating the place with planets that look a whole lot like Earth (and specifically, parts of California) featuring monsters, rapey aliens or Muppets. But real space is far, far stranger. You just have to know where to look to find things like ... #6. Science fiction writers have this annoying thing they do where they can only think of like five different types of planets. But scientists have studied almost 700 real planets outside the solar system, and some of them are downright gaudy. Via Inewp.comIt's a wedding gem worthy of Jesus or the Sultan of Dubai. How Is This Even Possible? Via Spaceflightnow.comWhat a dick! Carbon is just a shitload of heat and pressure away from becoming a diamond. Photos.com"Yeah, that's cute. #5. #4.

Extragalactic astronomy Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field Extragalactic astronomy is the branch of astronomy concerned with objects outside our own Milky Way galaxy. In other words, it is the study of all astronomical objects which are not covered by galactic astronomy, the next level of galactic astronomy. As instrumentation has improved, more distant objects can now be examined in detail. It is therefore useful to sub-divide this branch into Near-Extragalactic Astronomy and Far-Extragalactic Astronomy. The former deals with objects such as the galaxies of our Local Group, which are close enough to allow very detailed analyses of their contents (e.g. supernova remnants, stellar associations). Some topics include: References[edit] See also[edit]

Biology's 'dark matter' hints at fourth domain of life - life - 18 March 2011 Read more: Click here to read the updated version of this story Step far enough back from the tree of life and it begins to look quite simple. At its heart are just three stout branches, representing the three domains of life: bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. But that's too simple, according to a band of biologists who believe we may be on the verge of discovering the fourth domain of life. The bold statement is the result of an analysis of water samples collected from the world's seas. Most species on the planet look like tiny single cells, and to work out where they fit on the tree of life biologists need to be able to grow them in the lab. Life's dark matter To probe life's dark matter, Eisen, Craig Venter of the J. When Eisen and Venter used the technique on samples collected from the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition, they found that some sequences belonging to two superfamilies of genes – recA and rpoB – were unlike any seen before. "The question is, what are they from?"

Interactive 3D model of Solar System Planets and Night Sky Galactic astronomy Galactic astronomy is the study of our own Milky Way galaxy and all its contents. This is in contrast to extragalactic astronomy, which is the study of everything outside our galaxy, including all other galaxies. Galactic astronomy should not be confused with galaxy formation and evolution, which is the general study of galaxies, their formation, structure, components, dynamics, interactions, and the range of forms they take. Our own Milky Way galaxy, where our Solar System belongs, is in many ways the best studied galaxy, although important parts of it are obscured from view in visible wavelengths by regions of cosmic dust. Subcategories[edit] A standard set of subcategories is used by astronomical journals to split up the subject of Galactic Astronomy:[citation needed] Stellar populations[edit] Interstellar medium[edit] See also[edit] External links[edit]

Did exploding stars help life on Earth thrive? Research by a Danish physicist suggests that the explosion of massive stars -- supernovae -- near the Solar System has strongly influenced the development of life. Prof. Henrik Svensmark of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) sets out his novel work in a paper in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. When the most massive stars exhaust their available fuel and reach the end of their lives, they explode as supernovae, tremendously powerful explosions that are briefly brighter than an entire galaxy of normal stars. The remnants of these dramatic events also release vast numbers of high-energy charged particles known as galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Prof. Comparing this with the geological record, he found that the changing frequency of nearby supernovae seems to have strongly shaped the conditions for life on Earth. He also notices that most geological periods seem to begin and end with either an upturn or a downturn in the supernova rate.

maverick science.com Top 3 Questions People Ask an Astrophysicist (and Answers) Credit: Alain R. | Wikimedia Commons Whether he's teaching class, socializing at a cocktail party or talking to visitors at the planetarium where he works, Charles Liu knows that sooner or later he's going to get asked at least one of three questions: Is there a god? Are there aliens? What would happen if I fell into a black hole? "I've never been in a public environment where people know what I do where at least one of these questions was not asked," Liu said. Over the years, Liu has developed some pretty solid answers, based on scientific evidence and his own opinion, to those three burning questions.

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