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Largest star ever discovered, compared to our Sun

Largest star ever discovered, compared to our Sun

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4iD-9GSW-0

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If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth The Quest For Life How did life on Earth begin? Is there life beyond our planet? Is there a future for humankind on other planets? StarChild: A Learning Center for Young Astronomers The StarChild site is a service of the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), Dr. Alan Smale (Director), within the Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at NASA/GSFC. StarChild Authors: The StarChild Team StarChild Graphics & Music: Acknowledgments StarChild Project Leader: Dr. Laura A. Whitlock Curator: Responsible NASA Official: If you have comments or questions about the StarChild site, please send them to us.

Earth - Your life on earth Explore BBC Earth's unique interactive, personalised just to you. Find out how, since the date of your birth, your life has progressed; including how many times your heart has beaten, and how far you have travelled through space. Investigate how the world around you has changed since you've been alive; from the amount the sea has risen, and the tectonic plates have moved, to the number of earthquakes and volcanoes that have erupted. Grasp the impact we've had on the planet in your lifetime; from how much fuel and food we've used to the species we've discovered and endangered. And see how the BBC was there with you, capturing some of the most amazing wonders of the natural world.

2012 - 10 - Meet ESA, the space agency for Europe Meet ESA, the space agency for Europe 4.88 /5 ( 57 votes cast) Rate this Video Currently 5 out of 5 Stars. Monster of The Milky Way Astronomers are closing in on the proof they’ve sought for years that one of the most destructive objects in the universe - a super massive black hole - lurks at the center of our own galaxy. Could it flare up and consume our entire galactic neighborhood? NOVA takes us on a mind-bending investigation into one of the most bizarre corners of cosmological science: black hole research. From event horizon to singularity, the elusive secrets of supermassive black holes are revealed through stunning computer-generated imagery, including an extraordinary simulation of what it might look like to fall into the belly of such an all-devouring beast. Space, itself, is falling inside the black hole.

Hundreds of billions of stars are strewn like fairy lights in the dark cosmic ocean of the universe. Until 25 years ago, our observations of the beauty and destruction of the cosmos was obscured by Earth’s atmosphere—the Hubble Space Telescope has liberated astronomers from earth-bound worries like atmospheric turbulence. As unassuming as the Hubble may look compared to the vastness of space, the telescope is actually the length of a large school bus, weighs as much as two elephants, and travels around Earth at 5 miles per second. It has also beamed back thousands of cosmic images over the last two decades, including: the birth and death of stars, beautiful galactic pinwheels, interstellar clouds of dust, planets with sixty-seven moons, and ancient stars. Today, we celebrate the contribution the Hubble Space Telescope has made as well as look to the future.

Cosmic Voyage Nominated for an Academy Award, this 36-minute IMAX production offers a state of the art, computer generated journey through the universe, and tries to pinpoint the role of human beings cohabitating within its vastness. Among the topics included are a variety of the greatest scientific theories known to exist - some of which had never before been visualized on film - as well as a guided tour through the cosmos and solar system, and a look at the nature of black holes and exploding supernovas. This IMAX offering presents us with not only one but two journeys - one in space (going from the entire universe to quarks) and one in time (going from the first cells to human beings).

Current Night Sky This month, there will be opportunities to see four planets nearly simultaneously. In order from west to east they are: Mercury, Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn. In the same line as these planets, you will be able to see four bright, first-magnitude stars: Pollux, Regulus, Spica, and Antares.

Cosmos: A Personal Voyage With Cosmos, Carl Sagan and his wife and co-writer, Ann Druyan, brilliantly illustrated the underlying science of his same-titled book, placing the human species within a space-and-time context that brought the infinite into stunningly clear view. The series, which originally aired in 1980 on PBS, has been seen by more than 700 million people worldwide and remains a high-water mark in miniseries history. Sagan lucidly explains such topics as Einstein's theory of relativity, Darwin's theory of evolution, and the greenhouse effect, bringing the mysteries of the universe down to a layman’s level of understanding. The footage in these remastered, seven-DVD or seven-VHS sets is as fresh and riveting as it was two decades ago and is certain to fire the imaginations of a whole new generation of viewers. This is THE GREATEST television series ever. This documentary inspired me to a love of science, learning, and freedom of inquiry that have shaped both my interests and intellectual curiosity.

Mercury shines brightly after sunset For those who like to hunt for treasure, May offers nice views of the solar system’s most elusive naked-eye planet. Mercury appears as a pale-yellow dot low in the west-northwest during evening twilight starting at the end of May’s first week and continuing through the end of the month. Although Mercury shines brightly, it can be hard to pick out against the twilight glow. Fortunately, the planet Jupiter serves as a guide. Jupiter shines brighter than any other point of light in the evening sky. Head outside about 30 minutes after sunset, and the brilliant planet will dazzle your eye from its perch high in the west. The Elegant Universe Adapted from a provocative book by Brian Greene, this deeply engrossing documentary -- which originally aired on PBS's NOVA in three parts -- attempts to explain the controversial string theory, a complicated scientific proposal that, in short, posits a single explanation for many of the universe's mysteries. As affable an egghead as you're likely to find, Greene engages an array of physicists in his examination of string theory, which in part blends Einstein's theory of relativity with the complex laws governing quantum mechanics. Although mind-numbing technical terms are kept to a minimum, those of us not conversant with advanced physics might feel a bit lost at times.

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